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I have a class called Location and I needed to add a CArray to its member variables. This change caused the need to overload the assignment operator.

Is there a way to copy all of the variables in this class type that were being copied before I made the change and just add the additional code to copy the CArray without copying every single member variable individually?

Location& Location::operator=(const Location &rhs) 
{
    // Only do assignment if RHS is a different object from this.
    if (this != &rhs) 
    {
        //Copy CArray
        m_LocationsToSkip.Copy(rhs.m_LocationsToSkip);

        //Copy rest of member variables
        //I'd prefer not to do the following
        var1 = rhs.var1;
        var2 = rhs.var2;
        //etc
    }

    return *this;
}
share|improve this question
    
So you want to, in effect, call the compiler-generated assignment operator? Does CArray have an assignment operator? – Seth Carnegie Jan 14 '12 at 23:46
    
It has a copy constructor but no assignment operator. I'm not sure that I can call the compiler generated assignment operator since I've added a CArray member variable. – Cole W Jan 14 '12 at 23:49
2  
No, you can't call the compiler generated one because it's not generated any more when you provide one (not because you added a CArray member; the only thing that changes is that the compiler generated one for your class can't call the one for CArray because it doesn't exist). I'm afraid there's no way to do this. – Seth Carnegie Jan 14 '12 at 23:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, sort of. Use a type that overloads operator= itself, so you don't have to do it in the containing class instead. Even when writing MFC code, I still mostly use std::vector, std::string, etc., instead of the MFC collection and string classes. Sometimes you're pretty much stuck using CString, but I can't recall the last time I used CArray instead of std::vector.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the closest to what I need. Unfortunately the rest of the application uses mfc containers and I hate to change this to use an stl container. This is a good solution otherwise though. Thanks. – Cole W Jan 15 '12 at 0:18

Yes. What I usually do is to put everything in a Members struct in the class except what is not copyable. Like this:

class Location
{
   struct Members
   {
      int var1, var2;
   };

   Members m;
   CArray m_LocationsToSkip;

public:
   Location& operator=(Location const& rhs);
};

Location& Location::operator=(const Location &rhs) 
{
    // Only do assignment if RHS is a different object from this.
    if (this != &rhs) 
    {
        //Copy CArray
        m_LocationsToSkip.Copy(rhs.m_LocationsToSkip);

        //Copy rest of member variables
        m = rhs.m; //will use Members automatically generated operator=
                   //which should do the correct thing because you only put
                   //normally copyable members in m
    }

    return *this;
}

I first posted about this here: What is your most useful C/C++ utility?

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a decent solution but it would take quite a bit of refactoring across the rest of the application to support this. – Cole W Jan 15 '12 at 15:20
    
@Cole W: how so? your members are public and used everywhere in the application? In that case, another alternative would be to create a resource-managing class to englobe the CArray (somewhat the other way around than the example) so you would possibly have only one member that might need refactoring (possibly not depending on how it is used). I used that example with the struct because that's what I needed in my code (it was for pointer, not an array, and a smart pointer was not what I needed) but in your case, creating a resource-managing class for the CArray could be a better choice. – n1ckp Jan 15 '12 at 16:38

No you cant. Best way to do this is use script to generate real code.

share|improve this answer

This is usually done with what's called "copy and swap idiom". You implement a copy constructor and a swap() method that exchanges member values and, most importantly, pointers to external data. With that your assignment operator looks like:

C& C::operator=( const C& c ) {
    C tmp( c );
    this->swap( tmp );
    return *this;
}

You don't even need a self-assignment guard with this.

share|improve this answer
    
But now you have to enumerate all members in your swap implementation. This just moves the problem, it doesn't solve it. – Ben Voigt Jan 15 '12 at 3:16
    
Well, I don't see a problem here. Too many value members? Package them in a struct and just do an assignment if you are going for less typing. – Nikolai N Fetissov Jan 15 '12 at 6:14

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