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I don't understand why I have to implement the OnClickListener to use the OnClick-method. Assuming this code:

public class KlickitestActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {
/** Called when the activity is first created. */
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);
}

@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
    // code what happens when a click is made
}

From the class OnClickListener I only use the method onClick(View v) - and this one is overwritten. Why can't I just define the onClick-method without implementing the OnClickListener?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can. You can do that by using an Anonymous Inner Class :

Button1.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View view) {
           //Do stuff
        }});
Button2.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View view) {
           //Do stuff
        }});

However implementing an OnClickListener makes it easier to handle events, and improves code readability. i.e You can use one Listener method, and passing a View to handle multiple buttons/listeners with a switch statement, something similar to :

public void onClick(View view){
    switch(view.getId()){

    case R.id.Button1:
        //Stuff for button 1
        break;

    case R.id.Button2:
        //Stuff for button 2
        break;
        break;

   case R.id.Button3:
        //Stuff for button 3
        break;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Mob, that's a very understandable answer for me! But I still don't understand what happens when I implement the OnClickListener. I mean it doesn't instantiate a new object of OnClickListener just by being implemented? (hope my language is understandable :-) – BNetz Jan 15 '12 at 0:15
1  
Implementing the OnCLickListener effectively makes your Activity class both an Activity and an OnCLickListener, meaning you can pass the instance of your Activity to the object that takes an OnClickListener as a parameter. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/concepts/interface.html – Scott Faria Jan 15 '12 at 0:37
    
Thanks, Scott, for the explanation! – BNetz Jan 15 '12 at 13:49

Just to expand on Mob's answer and also Scott's comment and link...

An Activity is primarily a framework for a UI and as such has no pre-defined way of interacting with a user. As designers / developers we choose which UI components we want the Activity to contain based on the purpose of the Activity.

The UI components such as Buttons, CheckBoxes, ListViews and so on, serve very different purposes and it is not the place of an Activity in it's basic form to know what events those UI elements react to (click, long-click, swipe etc) simply because there is no pre-defined set of UI elements that an Activity will always host. As such it is our responsibility to implement the event handlers (listeners) that we need to use based on how we design the UI.

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