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I have 2 matrices and I need to multiply them and then print the results of each cell. As soon as one cell is ready I need to print it, but for example I need to print the [0][0] cell before cell [2][0] even if the result of [2][0] is ready first. So I need to print it by order. So my idea is to make the printer thread wait until the multiplyThread notifies it that the correct cell is ready to be printed and then the printerThread will print the cell and go back to waiting and so on..

So I have this thread that does the multiplication:

public void run() 
{
    int countNumOfActions = 0; // How many multiplications have we done
    int maxActions = randomize(); // Maximum number of actions allowed

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {       
        result[rowNum][colNum] = result[rowNum][colNum] + row[i] * col[i];
        countNumOfActions++;
        // Reached the number of allowed actions
        if (countNumOfActions >= maxActions)
        {
            countNumOfActions = 0;
            maxActions = randomize();
            yield();
        }   
    }
    isFinished[rowNum][colNum] = true;
    notify();
}

Thread that prints the result of each cell:

public void run()
{
    int j = 0; // Columns counter
    int i = 0; // Rows counter
    System.out.println("The result matrix of the multiplication is:");

    while (i < creator.getmThreads().length)
    {
        synchronized (this)
        {
            try 
            {
                this.wait();
            } 
            catch (InterruptedException e1) 
            {
            }
        }
        if (creator.getmThreads()[i][j].getIsFinished()[i][j] == true)
        {
            if (j < creator.getmThreads()[i].length)
            {
                System.out.print(creator.getResult()[i][j] + " ");
                j++;
            }
            else
            {
                System.out.println();
                j = 0;
                i++;
                System.out.print(creator.getResult()[i][j] + " ");
            }
        }
    }

Now it throws me these exceptions:

Exception in thread "Thread-9" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-6" Exception in thread "Thread-4" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-5" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-8" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-7" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-11" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-10" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)
Exception in thread "Thread-12" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
    at java.lang.Object.notify(Native Method)
    at multiplyThread.run(multiplyThread.java:49)

line 49 in multiplyThread is the "notify()"..I think I need to use the synchronized differently but I am not sure how.

If anyone can help this code to work I will really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance,

Greg

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8 Answers 8

up vote 133 down vote accepted

To be able to call notify() you need to synchronize on the same object.

synchronized (someObject) {
    someObject.wait();
}

/* different thread / object */
synchronized (someObject) {
    someObject.notify();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is faster than custom locks such as while(otherThread.notReady){} ? Or slower? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jun 1 '13 at 18:04
14  
The while(!JobCompleted); option is generally a bad idea because it ties up your CPU at 100% checking the same variable constantly (see here) –  Matt Lyons Jun 1 '13 at 21:39
5  
while(!JobCompleted) Thread.sleep(5); does not have that problem –  BeniBela Dec 25 '13 at 18:32
5  
It still has the problem of being something completely different. Polling (repeatedly checking if some condition is met, i.e. what you are doing) is generally less preferred over being notified if said condition is changed (i.e. what I outlined in the answer). –  Bombe Dec 27 '13 at 7:10

While using the wait and notify or notifyAll methods in Java the following things must be remembered:

  1. Use notifyAll instead of notify if you expect that more than one thread will be waiting for a lock.
  2. The wait and notify methods must be called in a synchronized context. See the link for a more detailed explanation.
  3. Always call the wait() method in a loop because if multiple threads are waiting for a lock and one of them got the lock and reset the condition, then the other threads need to check the condition after they wake up to see whether they need to wait again or can start processing.
  4. Use the same object for calling wait() and notify() method; every object has its own lock so calling wait() on object A and notify() on object B will not make any sense.
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Do you need to thread this at all ? I'm wondering how big your matrices are, and whether there's any benefit in having one thread print whilst the other does the multiplication.

Perhaps it would be worth measuring this time before doing the relatively complex threading work ?

If you do need to thread it, I would create 'n' threads to perform the multiplication of the cells (perhaps 'n' is the number of cores available to you), and then use the ExecutorService and Future mechanism to dispatch multiple multiplications simultaneously.

That way you can optimise the work based on the number of cores, and you're using the higher level Java threading tools (which should make life easier). Write the results back into a receiving matrix, and then simply print this once all your Future tasks have completed.

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+1 @Greg I think you should take a look at java.util.concurrent package, as pointed out by Brian. –  ATorras May 20 '09 at 8:42
1  
+1 and also check out this book which will also teach you the correct way to use wait() and notify() jcip.net –  Chii May 20 '09 at 12:44
    
Downvoted why ? –  Brian Agnew Jun 23 at 8:30

You can only call notify on objects where you own their monitor. So you need something like

synchronized(threadObject)
{
   threadObject.notify();
}
share|improve this answer

Let's say you have 'black box' application with some class named BlackBoxClass that has method doSomething();.

Further, you have observer or listener named onResponse(String resp) that will be called by BlackBoxClass after unknown time.

The flow is simple:

private String mResponse = null; 
 ...
BlackBoxClass bbc = new BlackBoxClass();
   bbc.doSomething();
...
@override
public void onResponse(String resp){        
      mResponse = resp;       
}

Lets say we don't know what is going on with BlackBoxClass and when we should get answer but you don't want to continue your code till you get answer or in other word get onResponse call. Here enters 'Synchronize helper':

public class SyncronizeObj {
public void doWait(long l){
    synchronized(this){
        try {
            this.wait(l);
        } catch(InterruptedException e) {
        }
    }
}

public void doNotify() {
    synchronized(this) {
        this.notify();
    }
}

public void doWait() {
    synchronized(this){
        try {
            this.wait();
        } catch(InterruptedException e) {
        }
    }
}
}

Now we can implement what we want:

public class Demo {

private String mResponse = null; 
 ...
SyncronizeObj sync = new SyncronizeObj();

public void impl(){

BlackBoxClass bbc = new BlackBoxClass();
   bbc.doSomething();

   if(mResponse == null){
      sync.doWait();
    }

/** at this momoent you sure that you got response from  BlackBoxClass because
  onResponse method released your 'wait'. In other cases if you don't want wait too      
  long (for example wait data from socket) you can use doWait(time) 
*/ 
...

}


@override
public void onResponse(String resp){        
      mResponse = resp;
      sync.doNotify();       
   }

}
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notify() needs to be synchronized as well

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For this particular problem, why not store up your various results in variables and then when the last of your thread is processed you can print in whatever format you want. This is especially useful if you are gonna be using your work history in other projects.

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This looks like a situation for producer-consumer pattern. If you’re using java 5 or up, you may consider using blocking queue(java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue) and leave the thread coordination work to the underlying framework/api implementation. See the example from java 5: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/BlockingQueue.html or java 7 (same example): http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/BlockingQueue.html

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