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Microsoft technet suggests [Math]::Floor([int]$a / [int]$b) for integer division. I believe that [int][Math]::Floor($a / $b) is both more readable as well as more performant due to one less cast operation. I have proven both methods equivalent. However, I cannot get consistent results. My methodology involves repeating both methodologies 10,000 times and measuring the results with the Measure-Command cmdlet. However cannot constuct a test where one test performs better than another test repeatedly. My code is below:

Write-Host
$loopLength = 10000

$runtime = Measure-Command {
    1..$loopLength | ForEach-Object {
        Foreach ($divisor in 2,3,5,7) {
            [Math]::Floor([int]$_ / [int]$divisor) > $null
        }
    }
}

"Double Cast: $($runtime.TotalMilliSeconds)"

$runtime = Measure-Command {
    1..$loopLength | ForEach-Object {
        Foreach ($divisor in 2,3,5,7) {
            [int][Math]::Floor($_ / $divisor) > $null           
        }
    }
}
"Single Cast: $($runtime.TotalMilliSeconds)"

How do I modify my code so I get consistent results that prove one method is better than another.

share|improve this question
    
I think you are missing [int][Math]::Floor($_ / $divisor) > $null from the second loop. –  Andy Arismendi Jan 15 '12 at 4:14
    
These appear to be so close in performance that the background processes of your system make the difference negligable. you could minimize background noise by stopping services, closing windows, etc. you could even boot in windows safe mode. (see msconfig.exe). I must say I don't see why casting the result of the operation would make the operation itself any faster. –  Elroy Flynn Jan 15 '12 at 4:34
    
@AndyArismendiquite right and corrected. You could have edited it yourself and left an edit comment. –  Justin Dearing Jan 15 '12 at 14:47
    
@ElroyFlynn I expect casting the result to be quiker than the two operands because its one case as opposed to two. –  Justin Dearing Jan 15 '12 at 14:48
    
Be careful of @AndyArismendi assertion, for me, on the mathematic point of view the result of an integer division on n bits fit in n bits. The thing that is wrong in his demonstation is that ([int]::MaxValue + 1) is a double in PowerShell that's exacly the oposit of what he want to demonstrate. –  JPBlanc Jan 16 '12 at 8:26

2 Answers 2

As for me, this performance optimization is not really important. PowerShell itself is far more slower than compiled langugages, so if you really need performance, use compiled languages or compile your code with Add-Type.

Besides that - if you test performance, you need minimal other code that could change the results. Foreach-Object itself adds its own complexity. That's why I would advice to use foreach statement instead.

Surprisingly, the results on my machine are sometimes opposite..

[76]: $loopLength = 100000
[77]:
[77]: $runtime = Measure-Command {
>>     foreach($i in 1..$loopLength) {
>>         Foreach ($divisor in 2,3,5,7) {
>>             [Math]::Floor([int]$i / [int]$divisor) > $null
>>         }
>>     }
>> }
>>
[78]: "Double Cast: $($runtime.TotalMilliSeconds)"
Double Cast: 16294.3328
[79]:
[79]: $runtime = Measure-Command {
>>     foreach($i in 1..$loopLength) {
>>         Foreach ($divisor in 2,3,5,7) {
>>             [int][Math]::Floor($i / $divisor) > $null
>>         }
>>     }
>> }
>> "Single Cast: $($runtime.TotalMilliSeconds)"
>>
Single Cast: 15924.3836
share|improve this answer

The example on TechNet is kinda silly because the numbers are already of type System.Int32. Take a look at this example:

PS C:\Users\andy> [math]::floor( 100 / 26 ).GetType().Fullname
System.Double
PS C:\Users\andy> (100).GetType().FullName
System.Int32
PS C:\Users\andy> [int].FullName
System.Int32

So it's completely unnecessary to put [int] in front of the Floor method parameters because they are already of type System.Int32.

Also, you wouldn't want to cast the returned System.Double to an Int32 anyway because the return value could be larger than an Int32 can hold. For example:

PS C:\Users\andy> [int][math]::floor( ([int]::MaxValue + 1) / 1 )
Cannot convert value "2147483648" to type "System.Int32". Error: "Value was either too large or too small for an Int32."

As for performance, the difference in speed is negligible. The PowerShell engine performs a lot of type adaptation and coercion behind the scenes whether you want it to or not... It was designed this way so system admins didn't have to worry too much about int's, double's, decimals etc... A number is a number right? ;-) For example:

[Math]::Floor("123")
# This outputs 123 as System.Double.

This wouldn't even compile in C#. The PowerShell runtime performs the necessary casting to meet the Floor method signature.

Another example:

"2" / "1"
# This outputs 2 as System.Int32.

Division isn't possible with strings but the PowerShell engine does transformation in the background for you to make this work.

Here are the performance results from my machine:

function Get-SingleCastTime {
    $runtime = Measure-Command {
        1..10000 | ForEach-Object {
            Foreach ($divisor in 2,3,5,7) {
                [int][Math]::Floor($_ / $divisor) > $null          
            }
        }
    }
    "Single Cast: $($runtime.TotalMilliSeconds)"
}

function Get-DoubleCastTime {
    $runtime = Measure-Command {
        1..10000 | ForEach-Object {
            Foreach ($divisor in 2,3,5,7) {
                [Math]::Floor([int]$_ / [int]$divisor) > $null
            }
        }
    }

    "Double Cast: $($runtime.TotalMilliSeconds)"
}

Get-SingleCastTime
#Single Cast: 614.6537

Get-DoubleCastTime
#Double Cast: 545.2668

Get-DoubleCastTime
#Double Cast: 514.2103

Get-SingleCastTime
#Single Cast: 526.9188
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful @Andy Arismendi when you wrote ([int]::MaxValue + 1) it's no longer an integer it's a double try on your command line ([int]::MaxValue + 1).gettype() that why the technet sample is written with cast. And for me on the mathematic point of view the result of an integer division on n bits fit in n bits. –  JPBlanc Jan 16 '12 at 8:22
    
@JPBlanc That example was to output a value that didn't fit in an Int32 to show why it isn't a good idea to do this [int][math]::Floor($aNumberBiggerThanInt32MaxValue) because of the exception. It's better to let the PowerShell runtime take care of it. –  Andy Arismendi Jan 16 '12 at 8:28

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