Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For two strings A and B, we define the similarity of the strings to be the length of the longest prefix common to both strings. For example, the similarity of strings "abc" and "abd" is 2, while the similarity of strings "aaa" and "aaab" is 3. Calculate the sum of similarities of a string S with each of its suffixes

Here is my solution...

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int getSim(char str[],int subindex)
{
    int l2=subindex
    int i=0;
    int count=0;
    for(i=0;i<l2;i++)
        if(str[i]==str[subindex])
        {
            count++;
            subindex++;
        }
        else
            break;
    return count;   
}
int main()
{
    int testcase=0;
    int len=0;
    int sum=0;
    int i=0;
    char s[100000];
    scanf("%d",&testcase);
    while(testcase--)
    {
        sum=0;
        scanf("%s",s);
        for(i=0;i<strlen(s);i++)
            if(s[i]==s[0])
            {
                sum=sum+getSim(s,i);
            }
        printf("%d\n",sum);
    }
}

How can we go about solving this problem using suffix array??

share|improve this question
1  
Is it homework? –  ZelluX Jan 15 '12 at 7:31
    
yup..:) updated –  agasthyan Jan 15 '12 at 7:34
1  
What is the output of your program that you feel is incorrect? If you're looking for a code review, try codereview.stackexchange... StackOverflow is for where you have a specific question you need answered. –  corsiKa Jan 15 '12 at 7:35
    
why do you speak of a suffix array? Shouldn't that be a prefix ? –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 15 '12 at 7:35
    
@glowcoder nothing is wrong with the output of my program....but it a bit slow when the input size increases..say 100000 length string....so some one suggested using a suffix array..... –  agasthyan Jan 15 '12 at 7:43

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure if it is the best algorithm, but here is the solution.

First of all, build suffix array. The naive algorithm(putting all suffixes into array and then sorting it) is quite slow - O(n^2 * log(n)) operations, there are several algorithms to do this in O(nlogn) time.

I'm assuming that strings are 0-indexed.

  1. Now, take the first letter l in the string s, and use one binary search to find the index i of the first string in the suffix array which starts with l, and another binary search to find the index j of the first string in range [i..n], which doesn't start with l. Then you'll have that all strings in the range [i..j-1] starts with the same letter l. So the answer to the problem is at least j-i.

  2. Then apply similar procedure to the strings in range [i..j). Take the second letter l2, find indexes i2 and j2 corresponding to the first string s[i2] such that s[i2][1] == l2 and the first string s[j2] such that s[j2][1] != l2. Add j2-i2 to the answer.

  3. Repeat this procedure n times, until you run out of letters in the original string. The answer to the problem is j1-i1 + j2-i2 + ... + jn-in

share|improve this answer

You mention in the comments that it is correct, but it's very slow.

In Java, you can get the length of a String with s.length() - this value is cached in the object and it is O(1) to get.

But when you go to C, you get the length of a string with strlen(s) which recalculates (in O(n)) each time. So while you should be doing O(n), because you have an O(n) operation in there, the entire function becomes O(n^2).

To get around this, cache the value once when you run it. This will bring you back into linear time.

Bad:

scanf("%s",s);
for(i=0;i<strlen(s);i++)
    if(s[i]==s[0])
    {
        sum=sum+getSim(s,i);
    }

Good:

scanf("%s",s);
strlen = strlen(s); /* assume you declared "int strlen" earlier */
for(i=0;i<strlen;i++) /* this is now constant time to run */
    if(s[i]==s[0])
    {
        sum=sum+getSim(s,i);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't give linear time for input with high similarity, the getSim() can also be O(n). Consider the case of memset(str, 'a', n). –  Daniel Fischer Jan 15 '12 at 10:39
    
@Daniel fair enough. I don't actually know his algorithm's current time. I was under the assumption that it was O(n) because this just seems like (call it programmer intuition) something that's done in O(n) time. Whatever his current time is, he can decrease it by a factor of n with the trick described above. –  corsiKa Jan 15 '12 at 21:02
    
Only if the work done inside the loop is O(1). It's of course always a good thing to calculate strlen() only once. That gets you from O(n*(n + body)) to O(n*body), but if body is O(n) too, it's a constant factor reduction, if body is O(n^2), it's peanuts, if body is O(sqrt(n)) it's a reduction by a factor of sqrt(n). –  Daniel Fischer Jan 15 '12 at 21:13
    
@Daniel ummm not exactly peanuts. If body is O(n^2) then without caching strlen your total is O(n^3). Going from cubic to quadratic is a HUGE increase in speed. In fact, the less efficient the body is, the better increase the cache gives. No matter what, it's always a factor of n. –  corsiKa Jan 15 '12 at 21:58
    
No. Say body is sum += strlen(s);. Without caching you have two strlen() calls per iteration, with caching you have one. You're not multiplying the cost of body with the cost of strlen(), you're adding them. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 15 '12 at 22:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.