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I've got a nested loop construct like this:

for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
             // Do something and break...
             break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
         }
    }
}

Now how can I break out of both loops. I've looked at similar questions, but none concerns Java specifically. I couldn't apply these solutions because most used gotos.

I don't want to put the inner loop in a different method.

Update: I don't want to rerun the loops, when breaking I'm finished with the execution of the loop block.

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1  
I hope so too @mtyson. Now I just need to find out what the hell he was talking about. :) –  Alexandre Martins Sep 13 '14 at 23:37
    
@Alexandre Martins: Aarrgg... you aren't going to tell us, are you? :) –  mtyson Sep 14 '14 at 19:03
7  
@mtyson Still nothing in the news. It's been 864 days since the Event, but no one seems to realize we don't live in the same world anymore... Hell, even I don't know what changed. And that scares me. I've quit my job and been living in the basement eating dirt and spiders, I'll stay there until I know it's safe outside. –  2Dee Oct 1 '14 at 15:19
10  
@2Dee - Every since The Day, May 20th, 2012, nothing is the same. The worst part is, I know Alexandre knows what the hell happened, and I don't. I've been living alone by a mountain creek, redesigning Java using a Turing machine made out of river stones. My hygiene isn't what it used to be. –  mtyson Oct 2 '14 at 19:38

21 Answers 21

up vote 1062 down vote accepted

(EDIT: Like other answerers, I'd definitely prefer to put the inner loop in a different method. This answer just shows how the requirements in the question can be met.)

You can use break with a label for the outer loop. For example:

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    outerloop:
    for (int i=0; i < 5; i++) {
      for (int j=0; j < 5; j++) {
        if (i * j > 6) {
          System.out.println("Breaking");
          break outerloop;
        }
        System.out.println(i + " " + j);
      }
    }
    System.out.println("Done");
  }
}

This prints:

0 0
0 1
0 2
0 3
0 4
1 0
1 1
1 2
1 3
1 4
2 0
2 1
2 2
2 3
Breaking
Done
share|improve this answer
129  
This does jump to directly after the loop. Try it! Yes, the label comes before the loop, but that's because it's labeling the loop, rather than the place you want to exit to. (You can continue with a label too.) –  Jon Skeet May 20 '09 at 9:15
3  
I also believe it is bad practice to ever use this. It means that you have to read all the inner-loop code to know if they will ever modify the parent loops flow. That seems dangerous. In the following code while(1) { expr1; while(1){ } expr2; }, expr2 should be safely assumed to execute. If it doesn't your introducing something unwieldy to maintain that is likely to surprise. –  Evan Carroll Dec 6 '11 at 22:56
6  
@Evan - that claim is clearly true - in languages that promise that it's true. But Java doesn't make that promise. If a language is in conflict with your assumptions, it's possible that it's your assumptions that are at fault. In this case, I think you're still partly right - principle of least surprise WRT the many who never heard of (or forgot about) that form of break. Even then, exceptions are another better-known exception (sorry). But I'd still be unhappy about this if it wasn't obvious (small loops, warning comment if the label/break still aren't visible enough). –  Steve314 Dec 7 '11 at 0:40
6  
it looks like a goto method I did not like this one. –  dursun Feb 19 '12 at 22:40
2  
@JWiley. Same here; easier to read: when you "hit" return, you can stop reading - easier to maintain: when fixing something before the return, you do not have to worry for side effects outside of the loop. IMHO, returning fast usually leads to more compact, simpler code. –  BGR Mar 20 '13 at 10:05

Technically the correct answer is to label the outer loop. In practice if you want to exit at any point inside an inner loop then you would be better off externalizing the code into a method (a static method if needs be) and then call it.

That would pay off for readability.

The code would become something like that:

private static String search(...) 
{
    for (Type type : types) {
        for (Type t : types2) {
            if (some condition) {
                // Do something and break...
                return search;
            }
        }
    }
    return null; 
}

Matching the example for the accepted answer:

 public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        loop();
        System.out.println("Done");
    }

    public static void loop() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
                if (i * j > 6) {
                    System.out.println("Breaking");
                    return;
                }
                System.out.println(i + " " + j);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Sometimes you use several local variables that's outside of the inner loop, passing them all in can feel clunky. –  Haoest Dec 7 '11 at 1:15
1  
So how is this solution supposed to print "Done" as in the accepted answer? –  JohnDoe Dec 7 '11 at 10:02
1  
@JohnDoe you call it and then you print System.out.println("done"); try { } finally { } within the search method is also an option. –  Zo72 May 16 '12 at 14:32
2  
This is better practice I guess, but what happens if you want to continue instead of breaking? Labels support either equally well (or badly!) but I'm not sure how to convert this logic for a continue. –  Robert Grant Oct 25 '13 at 10:01

You can use a named block around the loops:

search: {
    for (Type type : types) {
        for (Type t : types2) {
            if (some condition) {
                // Do something and break...
                break search;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
22  
You don't need to create a new block to use a label. –  Jon Skeet May 20 '09 at 9:13
46  
No, but it makes the intent a lot clearer. See the first comment on the accepted answer. –  Bombe May 20 '09 at 9:24
    
Jon: Ok, didn't know that as I didn't ever use them :) I just knew they existed and looked up in the spec. –  Joey May 20 '09 at 9:31
11  
+1 because named blocks is new to me. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 21 '09 at 1:09
    
this was a new concept for me too and solved my problem –  Master Zangetsu Mar 19 at 12:07

I never use labels. It seems like a bad practice to get into. Here's what I would do:

boolean finished = false;
for (int i = 0; i < 5 && !finished; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        if (i * j > 6) {
            finished = true;
            break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Shouldn't this be && !finished instead of || !finished? And why then use break at all and not use && !finished for the inner loop too? –  Gandalf Jul 12 '13 at 11:29
2  
I use break to be able to arbitrarily exit the loop. If there's code after that if block, you can break before it executes. But you're right about &&. Fixed it. –  Dan Mundy Jul 29 '13 at 16:44
1  
nice solution! that's exactly how I'd do it in practice if putting it in an extra function is not preferable for some reason. –  benroth Dec 10 '13 at 19:50
    
@Fortega: Then you also don't use switch{case} propably! Using break is not a bad practice, as long as it is used with common sense! –  Bigjim Mar 4 '14 at 11:45

you can use labels;



label1 : for(int i =0;;)
{
     for(int g =0;;)
     {
         break label1;
     }
}

share|improve this answer

maybe with a function?

public void doSomething(List<Type> types, List<Type> types2){
  for(Type t1 : types){
    for (Type t : types2) {
      if (some condition) {
         //do something and return...
         return;
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use a temporary variable:

boolean outerBreak = false;
for (Type type : types) {
   if(outerBreak) break;
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
             // Do something and break...
             outerBreak = true;
             break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
         }
    }
}

Depending on your function, you can also exit/return from the inner loop:

for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
         if (some condition) {
             // Do something and break...
             return;
         }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I find this way kind of cluttered. –  boutta May 20 '09 at 9:19
3  
Clumsy and error-prone IMHO. –  orbfish Oct 19 '11 at 18:42
5  
An extra condition check every time through the loop? No thanks. –  ryandenki Dec 7 '11 at 4:29

I needed to do a similar thing, but I chose not to use the enhanced for loop to do it.

int s = type.size();
for (int i = 0; i < s; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < t.size(); j++) {
        if (condition) {
            // do stuff after which you want 
            // to completely break out of both loops
            s = 0; // enables the main loop to terminate
            break;
        }
    }
}
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If you don't like breaks and gotos, you can use a "traditional" for loop instead the for-in, with an extra abort condition:

int a, b;
bool abort = false;
for (a = 0; a < 10 && !abort; a++) {
    for (b = 0; b < 10 && !abort; b++) {
        if (condition) {
            doSomeThing();
            abort = true;
        }
    }
}
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I prefer to add an explicit "exit" to the loop tests. It makes it clear to any casual reader that the loop may terminate early.

boolean earlyExit = false;
for(int i=0;i<10&&!earlyExit; i++) {
 for(int j=0;i<10&&!earlyExit; j++) { earlyExit=true; }
}
share|improve this answer
boolean broken = false; // declared outside of the loop for efficiency
for (Type type : types) {
    for (Type t : types2) {
        if (some condition) {
            broken = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (broken) {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Like @1800 INFORMATION suggestion, use the condition that breaks the inner loop as a condition on the outer loop:

boolean hasAccess = false;
for (int i = 0; i < x && hasAccess == false; i++){
  for (int j = 0; j < y; j++){
    if (condition == true){
      hasAccess = true;
      break;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You just use label for breaking inner loops

public class Test {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    outerloop:
for (int i=0; i < 5; i++) {
  for (int j=0; j < 5; j++) {
    if (i * j > 6) {
      System.out.println("Breaking");
      break outerloop;
    }
    System.out.println(i + " " + j);
  }
}
System.out.println("Done");
}
}
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1  
What is the difference from the accepted answer? –  vefthym May 21 '14 at 14:49

Use Labels.

INNER:for(int j = 0; j<numbers.length; j++){
            System.out.println("Even number: " + i + ", break  from INNER label");
            break INNER;
        }

Refer this article http://javarevisited.blogspot.com/2012/05/break-continue-and-lablel-in-loop-java.html

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Another one solution, mentioned without example (it actually works in prod code).

try {
    for (Type type : types) {
        for (Type t : types2) {
            if (some condition #1) {
                // Do something and break the loop.
                throw new BreakLoopException();
            }
        }
    }
}
catch (BreakLoopException e) {
    // Do something on look breaking.
}

Of course break exception should be internal, private and accelerated with no-stack-trace:

private static class BreakLoopException extends Exception {
    @Override
    public StackTraceElement[] getStackTrace() {
        return new StackTraceElement[0];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It has been mentioned actually, in an answer getting -23 votes... stackoverflow.com/a/886980/2516301 . It will do the work, but it is a very bad programming practice... –  vefthym Oct 10 '14 at 14:09
    
indeed. however I saw such legacy code - 4-levels nested loops with several breaking conditions. and it was more readable with exceptions rather than with inlined code. -23 votes is mostly emotional rating, but yes - this approach should be used carefully. –  ursa Oct 10 '14 at 14:22
even creating a flag for outer loop and checking that after each execution of inner loop can be the answer.
like this :
for (Type type : types) {
            boolean flag=false;
            for (Type t : types2) {
                if (some condition) {
                    // Do something and break...
                    flag=true;
                    break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
                }
            }
            if(flag)
                break;
        }
share|improve this answer

Check if the inner loop is exited with an if statement, by checking the inner loop's variable. You could also create another variable such as a boolean to check if the inner loop is exited.

In this example it uses the inner loop's variable to check if it has been exited:

int i, j;
for(i = 0; i < 7; i++){

for(j = 0; j < 5; j++) {

     if (some condition) {
         // Do something and break...
         break; // Breaks out of the inner loop
     }
}
     if(j < 5){    // Checks if inner loop wasn't finished
     break;    // Breaks out of the outer loop   
     } 
}
share|improve this answer
boolean condition = false;
for (Type type : types) {
  for (int i = 0; i < otherTypes.size && !condition; i ++) {
    condition = true; // if your condition is satisfied
  }
}

Use condition as a flag for when you are done processing. Then the inner loop only continues on while the condition has not been met. Either way the outer loop will keep on chuggin'.

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Rather unusual approach but in terms of code length (not performance) this is the easiest thing you could do:

for(int i=0; i++; i<j){
    if(wanna exit){
        i=i+j; //if more nested, also add the 
               //maximum value for the other loops
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can break from all loops without using any label: and flags.

It's just tricky solution.

Here condition1 is the condition which is used to break from loop K and J. And condition2 is the condition which is used to break from loop K , J and I.

For example:

public class BreakTesting {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
                for (int k = 0; k < 9; k++) {
                    if (condition1) {
                        System.out.println("Breaking from Loop K and J");
                        k = 9;
                        j = 9;
                    }
                    if (condition2) {
                        System.out.println("Breaking from Loop K, J and I");
                        k = 9;
                        j = 9;
                        i = 9;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println("End of I , J , K");
    }
}
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You can throw an exception, or repeat the inner loop condition in the outer loop.

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40  
"throwing an Exception" would work, but mis-using exceptions for flow control is A Bad Thing (tm). –  Joachim Sauer May 20 '09 at 9:21
4  
You too can make a suggestion without prejudice as to the worth of the idea –  1800 INFORMATION May 20 '09 at 9:23
15  
Throwing an exception will only get you on thedailywtf.com. :) –  Bombe May 20 '09 at 9:24
8  
Exceptions are supposed to be used in "exceptional" circumstances, i.e. when something doesn't work right. This is part of the logical flow of an algorithm, and therefore shouldn't rely on throwing an exception. –  ahugenerd Dec 6 '11 at 16:36
3  
exceptions are for exceptional cases not for coming out from a loop –  Zo72 Dec 22 '11 at 14:07

protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 29 '13 at 17:04

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