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Suppose I have a file insert.c in which two functions are defined: 1.insert_after 2.insert_before

The definitions of these func are something like this:

insert_after(arg1)
{ 
  if(condition 1)
    { ......... } 
  else
    insert_before(arg1); 
}

insert_before(arg)
{ 
  if(condition 1)
    { ......... } 
  else
    insert_after(arg); 
}

Now if this file insert.c is included in main.c and insert_after function is called

# include "insert.c"
int main()
{
  insert_after(arg);
  return 0;
}

On compiling main.c using gcc,the following error is encountered:

conflicting types for ‘insert_before’

note: previous implicit declaration of ‘insert_before’ was here

What is wrong here and how to avoid it?

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1  
Please post your actual code. You've got conflicting declarations which could mean no prototype, incorrect prototype, or typos. Impossible to tell with "pseudocode" –  Mat Jan 15 '12 at 12:35
1  
Those aren't function definitions. You're missing the parameter types. Is this the actual code that you're trying to compile? –  Cody Gray Jan 15 '12 at 12:36
    
Can you compile insert.c standalone without errors? –  ta.speot.is Jan 15 '12 at 12:36
2  
If you are expecting help to eliminate a syntax error, you really should post the actual code and the actual error message and line number. What you have posted is not very helpful. –  talonmies Jan 15 '12 at 12:37
2  
Apart from the answers you'll get, there are a few things to note: 1) Never use implicit types. Be explicit: int insert_after(int arg). 2) Never #include a .c file. Create a .h file with the prototypes and include that. –  DarkDust Jan 15 '12 at 12:38
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is because you don't declare prototypes for your functions. A function which has no prototype, by default, has an unknown set of arguments and returns an int. But this is not the case for insert_before.

Create a file insert.h in which you declare them:

#ifndef INSERT_H
#define INSERT_H

void insert_before(type_of_arg);
void insert_after(type_of_arg);

#endif /* INSERT_H */

and include this file at the top of insert.c.

You should then compile with:

gcc -Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -Wmissing-prototypes -o progname insert.c main.c
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create a .h file and give those functions prototypes (the Wikipedia entry describing prototypes is linked for you).

the .h file would contain just the functions:

insert_before(arg);
insert_after(arg);

Also, you should probably have a return type and a parameter type (e.g. void insert_before(char * arg); Compilers are really good with type checking and it will save you headaches later.

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The problem is that you call insert_before before the compiler knows about it. Give them appropriate prototypes (in a header file) and include the header file in both insert.c and main.c

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The main problem is that you have not declared the functions fully. Each function signature should start with a return variable type, and all arguments should be specified with a type, i.e:

void insert_before(int arg)
{
...
}

To have two functions call each other, you will need to forward declare one at least, but usually you do it for all your functions and put it in a common .h file which gets included in your source files which use that function. These 'forward declarations' are commonly known as function prototypes, and look like this:

void insert_before(int arg);
void insert_after(int arg);

Indentation is a real problem... that could be a symptom of posting in SO, but posting code on here is also more readable if it is indented.

Also, if condition 1 is the same in both functions, then you will probably have infinite recursive calls which will lead to a stack overflow.

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