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DesignerProperties exposes two similar design states with GetIsInDesignMode(element) and IsInDesignTool.

  • What's the difference between them?
  • Why should I use one over the other?
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2 Answers 2

A quick google search shows that it appears that IsInDesignTool works for Silverlight and ExpressionBlend. So perhaps IsInDesignMode is what is used for VS, but IsInDesignTool is needed for the others.

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They are exactly the same thing

IsInDesignTool
"true if the element is running in the context of a designer; otherwise, false. " MDSDN of IsInDesignTool

GetIsInDesignMode(element)
"The IsInDesignMode property value for the element." MDSDN of GetIsInDesignMode(element)

HOWEVER once in every blue moon Visual Studio fails

DesignerProperties.GetIsInDesignMode(this)

So its best to use

return DesignerProperties.GetIsInDesignMode(this) || DesignerProperties.IsInDesignTool;

If you dont want it to ever crash.

.Net Reflector for Silverlight

public static bool GetIsInDesignMode(DependencyObject element)
{
    if (element == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("element");
    }
    bool flag = false;
    if (Application.Current.RootVisual != null)
    {
        flag = (bool) Application.Current.RootVisual.GetValue(IsInDesignModeProperty);
    }
    return flag;
}


public static bool IsInDesignTool
{
    get
    {
        return isInDesignTool;
    }
    [SecurityCritical]
    set
    {
        isInDesignTool = value;
    }
}

internal static bool InternalIsInDesignMode
{
    [CompilerGenerated]
    get
    {
        return <InternalIsInDesignMode>k__BackingField;
    }
    [CompilerGenerated]
    set
    {
        <InternalIsInDesignMode>k__BackingField = value;
    }
}
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1  
You wrote They are exactly the same thing, however, nothing in the rest of your answer supports that statement. On the contrary, quite the opposite. Your two mini-excerpts from MSDN says nothing about their identicality and the Reflector snippet shows that they have no part of their implementation identical. –  Johann Gerell Jan 15 '12 at 21:02
    
It's in italics.......They should technically yield the same result but they do it differently. –  MyKuLLSKI Jan 15 '12 at 21:41

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