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I try to learn about double dispatch and the visitor pattern, but the following code is clearly wrong. I must be missing something obvious but I don't know how to fix it. Can anyone illuminate me? I don't know how to put concrete instances in the visitor, should I create a constructor in concrete visitor classes?

interface Collidable
{
    void Accept(IVisitor other);
}

class Asteroid : Collidable
{
    public void Accept(IVisitor other)
    {
        Console.Write("[Asteroid] ");
        other.visitAsteroid(this);
    }
}

class Spaceship : Collidable
{
    public void Accept(IVisitor other)
    {
        Console.Write("[Spaceship] ");
        other.visitSpaceship(this);
    }
}

interface IVisitor
{
    void visitAsteroid(Asteroid a);
    void visitSpaceship(Spaceship s);
}

class CollisionWithAsteroidVisitor : IVisitor
{
    public void visitAsteroid(Asteroid a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with asteroid");
    }

    public void visitSpaceship(Spaceship s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with asteroid");
    }
}

class CollisionWithSpaceShipVisitor : IVisitor
{
    public void visitAsteroid(Asteroid a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with spaceship");
    }

    public void visitSpaceship(Spaceship s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with spaceship");
    }
}

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Asteroid a1 = new Asteroid();
        Asteroid a2 = new Asteroid();
        Spaceship s1 = new Spaceship();
        Spaceship s2 = new Spaceship();

        s1.Accept(new CollisionWithAsteroidVisitor()); // this must be wrong
        s1.Accept(new CollisionWithSpaceShipVisitor()); // this must be wrong
    }
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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 15 '12 at 12:58

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Why would this code be wrong? Have you tried to compile it? In C# if you do not specify a constructor, the compiler will define an empty default constructor for you, and the lines you have marked are completely legal. As far as I see, this code works and behaves as expected. –  buc Jan 15 '12 at 13:12
    
@buc The problem is I'd like to have specific two objects collide with each other. for example to make s1 spaceship collide with a1 asteroid, or s1 ship collide with a2 asteroid and so on. It is very easy to achieve with RTTI but here I must be doing something wrong. –  Firkraag Jan 15 '12 at 13:34
    
In this case your objects must behave both as acceptors and visitors depending on what is colliding to another object. To achive this, they both have to implement the IVisitor interface, and no specific visitor classes needed. I'll show an example in my answer... –  buc Jan 15 '12 at 13:44
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I can understand, you want to achieve that the different objects could collide to each other, and when such a collision occurs the participants would know what other kind of object they had collided to.

To achieve this without using reflection (or RTTI as you say, although it's a C++ term), it's good approach to use the Visitor pattern. What you have done wrong it that in this scenario both object would act as acceptor and visitor depending on which is collided to which. The object we are colliding to will be the acceptor ("accepts colliding object"), and the object that is colliding into the other one becomes the visitor ("visits/collides to the acceptor object).

The acceptor-visitor roles may be reversed when the colliding object is the other one (moving asteroid colliding into a spaceship vs. moving spaceship colliding into a stationary asteroid). From this example you can see, that one object may act as acceptor or visitor depending on the case. This must be reflected in the class hierarchy, so both objects have to implement either the ICollidable and the IVisitor interface.

I rewrote the code you have posted, so both Asteroid and Spaceship classes implement the two interfaces. The additional visitor classes are not needed anymore, because our objects themself became the visitor:

interface ICollidable
{
    void Accept(IVisitor other);
}

interface IVisitor
{
    void VisitAsteroid(Asteroid a);
    void VisitSpaceship(Spaceship s);
}

class Asteroid : ICollidable, IVisitor
{
    public void Accept(IVisitor other)
    {
        Console.Write("[Asteroid] ");
        other.VisitAsteroid(this);
    }

    public void VisitAsteroid(Asteroid a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with asteroid");
    }

    public void VisitSpaceship(Spaceship s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with asteroid");
    }
}

class Spaceship : ICollidable, IVisitor
{
    public void Accept(IVisitor other)
    {
        Console.Write("[Spaceship] ");
        other.VisitSpaceship(this);
    }

    public void VisitAsteroid(Asteroid a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with spaceship");
    }

    public void VisitSpaceship(Spaceship s)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Collided with spaceship");
    }
}


class Main
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Asteroid a1 = new Asteroid();
        Asteroid a2 = new Asteroid();
        Spaceship s1 = new Spaceship();
        Spaceship s2 = new Spaceship();

        s1.Accept(a1);
        s1.Accept(as);
        a1.Accept(s1);
        a2.Accept(a2);
    }
}

And if you run the program you will get the following output in the console:

[Spaceship] Collided with asteroid
[Spaceship] Collided with spaceship
[Asteroid] Collided with spaceship
[Asteroid] Collided with asteroid

I hope it made clear for you how to use the Visitor pattern for this kind of scenarios.

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Thank you very much for the solution. It works indeed, but I have a bit mixed feelings. I think I've never seen objects implementing the IVistor interface (except the explicit visitor objects ofcourse). Your method is very interesting but maybe there is a solution which doesn't require SpaceShip and Asteroid classes to implement IVisitor? –  Firkraag Jan 15 '12 at 15:28
    
The Visitor pattern is usually used for iterating the elements (acceptors) of a collection and performing various operations (visitors) on them. In that case the roles are constant, the collection elements are always "passive" (they always are the acceptors) and the visitors are always visitors. When the roles mix up (like they do in your question) and an object must behave as an acceptor and as a visitor too, the simplest solution is to have it implement both interfaces. –  buc Jan 15 '12 at 15:48
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You might as well take a look at the Mediator pattern.

According to the Wikipedia page,

With the mediator pattern, communication between objects is encapsulated with a mediator object. Objects no longer communicate directly with each other, but instead communicate through the mediator. This reduces the dependencies between communicating objects, thereby lowering the coupling.

Concretely, in your case the Mediator would be a class to which all the Collidables would be registered and that will monitor them for collisions. When a collision occurs, the Mediator would call a HandleCollision(Collidable other) method on both colliding objects.

Another advantage about this is that you are not bound to any concrete implementations; your collision mechanism depends on the Collidable abstraction. Tomorrow you may add another class and just by making if implement the Collidable interface it'll be ready to fit in this mechanism, without changing anything else.

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This does not solve the problem if the colliding objects must know what kind of other objects they've collided with (an asteroid-asteroid collision would produce additional smaller asteroids, but an asteroid-spaceship collision would destroy the spaceship). With the Visitor pattern, the actual types of the participating objects are known. –  buc Jan 15 '12 at 16:28
    
@buc You are right. I got carried away by the idea of loose coupling. It looks like this kind of loose coupling cannot be achieved in this case, since the program must describe all possible types of collisions. –  w0lf Jan 15 '12 at 16:53
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