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I have following tables;

 A   B                       A   B
 _____                       _____
 1   t                       7   a
 2   r                       5   d
 3   e                       3   e
 4   f                       9   a
 5   d                       10  c
 6   s                       11  a
 7   a

And, output should be ;

 A   B                     
 _____                     
 1   t                      
 2   r                     

 4   f

 6   s

 9   a
 10  c
 11  a

In other words I want really different thing. I can only tell with this figure, take a look at. I want (A union B). How can I do that ?

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2  
Do the union (all), group and filter count > 1 –  nan Jan 15 '12 at 14:07
1  
What you want is the complement of A union B, or the intersection of the complement of A with the complement of B (De Morgan's Law). Also, the question would be clearer if you label your columns differently from your tables (both are A and B). –  Tim Gee Jan 15 '12 at 14:57
    
Also, your diagram doesn't really clarify what you want as C != the expected output described in the question. –  Tim Gee Jan 15 '12 at 15:03
    
A.k.a. symmetric difference, "the union without the intersection." –  onedaywhen Jan 16 '12 at 9:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This query will do it. It loads up all the records from both tables, then displays all those that exist once

SELECT
  A, B
FROM
  (SELECT A, B FROM TABLE1
   UNION ALL
   SELECT A, B FROM TABLE2)
  AS COMBINED
GROUP BY
  A, B
HAVING
    COUNT(*) = 1
ORDER BY A;
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1  
just noticed. thats exactly what Andrzej Nosal said –  Gary Jan 15 '12 at 14:13
SELECT f.A, f.B
FROM firstTable f
LEFT JOIN secondTable s ON (f.A = s.A)
WHERE (s.A IS NULL)
UNION
SELECT s.A, s.B
FROM firstTable f
RIGHT JOIN secondTable s ON (f.A = s.A)
WHERE (f.A IS NULL)
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SELECT iResult.* 
FROM
    (SELECT A, B
    FROM tableA
    WHERE A NOT IN
        (SELECT Distinct A FROM tableB)
    UNION
    SELECT A, B
    FROM tableB
    WHERE A NOT IN
        (SELECT Distinct A FROM tableB)) as iResult
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SELECT A, B
FROM Table1

UNION

SELECT A, B
FROM Table2

EXCEPT

SELECT t1.A, t1.B
FROM Table1 t1
  INNER JOIN Table2 t2 ON t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B
share|improve this answer
    
This is elegant, although it's worth noting MySQL still doesn't support EXCEPT*, even though it's standard SQL 92. *As of version 5.0.13 –  Tim Gee Jan 15 '12 at 19:48
    
@TimGee: I think you must be right. Still, the question is tagged sqlite at the moment. :) –  Andriy M Jan 15 '12 at 21:00
    
Can replace the last part (inner join) with SELECT A, B FROM Table1 INTERSECT SELECT A, B FROM Table2 and add parens for clarity and safety because the precedence for INTERSECT, EXCEPT and UNION is implementation dependent. –  onedaywhen Jan 16 '12 at 9:26
    
@onedaywhen: Absolutely. I was just trying to avoid a four-part query (A union B except (C intersect D), even though A = C and B = D), because that would make the resulting query hardly ever better than (A except B) union (C except D), which seemed too obvious and boring. So this is my attempt at cheating into ‘fewer’ selects (apparently). :) –  Andriy M Jan 16 '12 at 10:31

Edit Removed prior "solution" since I realised it's the same as the one proposed by Gary.

(select a, b from table_1 minus 
 select a, b from table_2)       union
(select a, b from table_2 minus 
 select a, b from table_1);

This seemed to work with the followoing data on Oracle:

create table table_1 (
  a number,
  b varchar(2)
);

create table table_2 (
  a number,
  b varchar(2)
);


insert into table_1 values  (1  ,'t');
insert into table_1 values  (2  ,'r');
insert into table_1 values  (3  ,'e');
insert into table_1 values  (4  ,'f');
insert into table_1 values  (5  ,'d');
insert into table_1 values  (6  ,'s');
insert into table_1 values  (7  ,'a');

insert into table_2 values  (7  ,'a');
insert into table_2 values  (5  ,'d');
insert into table_2 values  (3  ,'e');
insert into table_2 values  (9  ,'a');
insert into table_2 values  (10 ,'c');
insert into table_2 values  (11 ,'a');
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I don't think MINUS is SQL standard, although I suspect all you need to do is change it to EXCEPT for better compatibility. Even so, MySQL doesn't support EXCEPT. –  Tim Gee Jan 15 '12 at 19:46

Simply

SELECT a, b FROM table1 UNION SELECT a, b FROM table2;
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While technically this is the correct answer to (A union B) it should be apparent from reading the rest of the question that this is not what the questioner requires. –  Tim Gee Jan 15 '12 at 14:59

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