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Is there a way to get positional index during iteration in ember.js?

{{#each itemsArray}}
     {{name}}
{{/each}}

I'm looking for a way to have something like:

{{#each itemsArray}}
    {{name}} - {{index}}th place.
{{/each}}

Update:

As per the comment by @ebryn the below code works without using a nested view for each item:

<script type="text/x-handlebars">    
    {{#collection contentBinding="App.peopleController"}}
        Index {{contentIndex}}: {{content.name}} <br />
    {{/collection}}
</script>​

http://jsfiddle.net/WSwna/14/

Although to have something like adjustedIndex, a nested view would be required.

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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Actually yes you can get the position of the current index using the {{each}} helper. You have to create a view for every item in a list and then use {{_parentView.contentIndex}}.

<script type="text/x-handlebars">
{{#each App.peopleController}}
  {{#view App.PersonView contentBinding="this"}}
    Index {{_parentView.contentIndex}}: {{content.name}} {{adjustedIndex}} <br />
  {{/view}}
{{/each}}
</script>

App = Ember.Application.create();

App.peopleController = Ember.ArrayController.create({
  content: [ { name: 'Roy' }, { name: 'Mike' }, { name: 'Lucy' } ]
});

App.PersonView = Ember.View.extend(Ember.Metamorph, {
  content: null,
  // Just to show you can get the current index here too...
  adjustedIndex: function() {
    return this.getPath('_parentView.contentIndex') + 1;
  }.property()
});

See this jsFiddle for a working example.

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Could you please let me know why you need to pass in the Ember.Metamorph behaviour when extending the view? –  dagda1 Mar 20 '12 at 10:12
2  
You don't "need" to, but adding the Ember.Metamorph mixin makes the entire setup perform more like a normal each helper (talking speed and memory resources here) than the bloated collection helper. If you take a look at the source for the two and compare you'll see what I mean. For large amounts of data it makes a difference. –  Roy Daniels Mar 20 '12 at 10:38
1  
I get: Expected hash or Mixin instance, got [object Undefined] –  tomaszs Aug 2 '13 at 8:36
1  
Example is from over a year and a half ago... –  Roy Daniels Sep 10 '13 at 13:39
1  
Would be excellent/really helpful of you could update this answer, should people stumble on it trying to find a working answer! :) –  Andy Hayden Feb 26 at 5:51
show 6 more comments

In RC6 CollectionView provides contentIndex propery for each rendered view of collection. Each helper uses CollectionView in its implementation so uou can access index in this way:

{{#each itemsArray}}
    {{_view.contentIndex}}
{{/each}}
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WHen i use this in each controller i get weird numbers –  tomaszs Aug 2 '13 at 8:31
    
@tomaszs can you create a demo showing those numbers? –  chrmod Aug 5 '13 at 5:18
    
this works for me - i have an array in my controller and i just do something like this: {{#each prospects}} Index {{_view.contentIndex}}: {{name}} <br /> {{/each}} –  David Aug 5 '13 at 11:06
    
Without specifying the itemViewClass, we can use _view.contentIndex. But that does not work inside a #if helper within the #each. To do that we need to use: {{#each model itemViewClass="Ember.View"}} {{#if someCondition}} {{view.contentIndex}} {{/if}} {{/each}} "Specify an itemViewClass" –  Champ Jun 2 at 6:16
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As of Ember 9.8 and pre-1.0 you can wrap the "contentIndex" with a view in order to get at the virtual parent (the {{#each}}). If you don't add the view, your context ends up being either the main template, an item in your list or whatever you manually set with your {{#with}}. It is not impossible to get at the {{#each}} from the JS side but it is a lot more of a pain flipping through those child views.

{{#each App.peopleController}}
    {{#view}}
        Index {{view._parentView.contentIndex}}: {{name}} <br />
    {{/view}}
{{/each}}

...OR...

{{#each people in App.peopleController}}
    {{#view}}
        Index {{view._parentView.contentIndex}}: {{people.name}} <br />
    {{/view}}
{{/each}}

Just in-case you would like a fiddler.

DEMO

Note: You can create a view and do a this.get("_parentView.contentIndex") to get at the index if you want to modify the number at all.

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This isn't currently a feature of Handlebars or Ember.Handlebars. We have contentIndex available inside #collection/Ember.CollectionView. I think it's useful to support in #each too. Please file an issue at the GitHub repository: https://github.com/emberjs/ember.js/issues

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1  
Update to this: Handelbars has gained support for @index. It's not usable in Ember.Handlebars yet, but I imagine it will be sooner or later. –  Jo Liss Sep 17 '12 at 19:17
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I have modified a bit ud3323 solution using collection. Check here: http://jsfiddle.net/johngouf/WSwna/13/

<script type="text/x-handlebars">    
{{#collection contentBinding="App.peopleController"}}
  {{#view App.PersonView contentBinding="this"}}
    Index {{_parentView.contentIndex}}: {{content.name}} {{adjustedIndex}} <br />
  {{/view}}
{{/collection}}
</script>

App = Ember.Application.create();
App.peopleController = Ember.ArrayController.create({
 content: [ { name: 'Roy' }, { name: 'Mike' }, { name: 'Lucy' } ]
});

App.PersonView = Ember.View.extend({
 content: null,
 // Just to show you can get the current index here too...
 adjustedIndex: function() {
    return this.getPath('_parentView.contentIndex') + 1;
 }.property()
});

​​

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I think you could probably do something like this too

//add index property to all each queries
Handlebars.registerHelper('each', function(context, block) {
    var ret = "";
    for(var i=0, j=context.length; i<j; i++) {
        context[i].index = i;
        ret = ret + block(context[i]);
    }
    return ret;
});
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I had done that, but didn't feel right to override behavior of inbuilt iterator. –  Gubbi Feb 22 '12 at 20:31
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