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How does the Setters and Getters in C# implement Encapsulation? I am not new when it comes to these setters and getters, I have background with programming, specifically java. in java you use setters and getters like this

Public class Person{
    private String fName;

    public void setName(String someName){
        fName = someName;
    }

    public String getName(){
        return fName;
    }
}

public class Test{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Person p = new Person();

        p.setName("Bob");
        System.out.println(p.getName);
    }
}

And in C# Using Shorthand

public class Person{
    public string fName{ get; set;}
}

How does the C# shorthand getters and setters implement encapsulation on this? how do I implement that C# code the same as the java code above? are there any restrictions regarding it? and base from my observation, I can only use that "fName" if its set to public, specifically "public string fName{ get; set;}" but when it comes to private I cannot. but when i set it to private, I can no longer access it in other methods.

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1  
They're called properties. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x9fsa0sw.aspx –  JB Nizet Jan 15 '12 at 17:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

They don't allow you to specify encapsulating behavior. What they do is allow you to specify that this is a Property in the public interface of your class, as opposed to a field.

The difference here is that in Java, getters and setters are simply methods that follow a certain convention (getXXX, setXXX). In C#, properties are a first-class construct (even though they are basically getters and setters behind the scenes). So C# provides these as a shorthand way of saying you might implement encapsulation later (e.g. add behavior to the getter or setter) but you don't want to break consumers of your class, so you are declaring them as properties up front.

In Java:

public class Foo {
    private String fooName;
    public String BarName;
    public String getFooName() { return fooName; }
    public String setFooName(String fooName) { this.fooName = fooName; }

}

In C#:

public class Foo {
    public String FooName { get; set; }
    public String BarName;
}

Lets assume you have a consumer class FooReader defined in another assembly that references the Foo assembly:

public class FooReader {
    public String ReadFoo(Foo foo) {
        // This returns the Foo **property**
        return foo.FooName;
    }

    public String ReadBar(Foo foo) {
        // This returns the Bar **field**
        return foo.BarName;
    }
}

Now, changing Foo to this doesn't break FooReader:

public class Foo {
    private String _fooName;
    public String FooName { get { return _fooName.ToUpper(); } set { _fooName = value; } }
    public String BarName;
}

but changing Foo to this WILL break FooReader- you'll need to recompile it:

public class Foo {
    private String _fooName;
    private String _barName;
    public String FooName { get { return _fooName.ToUpper(); } set { _fooName = value; } }

    // This breaks FooReader because you changed a field to a property
    public String BarName { get { return _barName.ToUpper(); } set { _barName = value; } }
}
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I am still confused, I wouldn't want to be a bother but would you mind posting an example of some sort? with java and C# comparison? –  user962206 Jan 15 '12 at 17:46
    
@user962206 You can replace the simple property later on with a more complex one with arbitrary logic if you have to implement specific behavior while still retaining binary and source code compatibility. –  Voo Jan 15 '12 at 17:51
    
See examples above –  Chris Shain Jan 15 '12 at 17:54
    
any examples online(proper ones) I've been googling and I never seem to find that suites my question. or the answer that suites my question or curiosity –  user962206 Jan 15 '12 at 17:55
    
Sorry for giving the late best answer, This is really useful! thank you! –  user962206 Feb 14 '12 at 17:57

As you say yourself, the C# version is a shorthand for the following:

private string _name;

public Name
{
   get { return _name; }
   set { _name = value; }
}

(Note that the private field isn't accessable, it's compiler generated. All your access will be via the property, even from inside the class)

In comparision to java, where getter/setter are simply methods, this construct is called a property in C#, and is a compiler feature.

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2  
Except that the name of the backing field is a compiler-generated name which is not usable from C# code. –  Ben Voigt Jan 15 '12 at 17:39
    
@BenVoigt and is an implementation detail subject to change even if you do manage to figure it out. –  Chris Shain Jan 15 '12 at 18:06
    
@Femaref What is value and how do i compare it with java code? –  Ankur Sharma Jun 14 '13 at 10:14
    
value is the parameter of the setter. In java, that would be like void setName(String value). –  Femaref Jun 14 '13 at 15:28

In, C# the equivalent of the code inside your Person class would be:

private String _name;

public string Name 
{
    get { return _name; }
    set { _name = value; }
}

As of C# 3, you can condense that down to:

public string Name { get; set; }

This is an automatically implemented property and the compiler will automatically generate the same encapsulating code as it will if you were to write it out the long way. A private backing field is automatically generated for you, as well as the get and set methods. Really, once the compiler generates the IL code, what you'll have is a field with two methods, get_Name and set_Name, so by using the auto-implemented property, you're letting the compiler generate nearly the same code as you have in your java example.

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Ohhh, but how can I add value to my name using the "public string Name { get; set; }" ? for example I am going to create an object of that class, Person p = new Person(). then How would I call those setters and getters? in java i can do it by p.getName, p.setName("Bib"), but in C# how would I do that?? –  user962206 Jan 16 '12 at 2:27
    
In C# you would use string personsName = p.Name for the getter and p.Name = "something" for the setter. –  Jeremy Wiggins Jan 16 '12 at 2:29
    
oh I see. but would it do I use it. like this Console.WriteLine(p.Name)?? and last question, with your answer does it mean that, There's Encapsulation on the short hand getters and setters of C#? –  user962206 Jan 16 '12 at 2:36
    
Sure, you could use it as part of Console.WriteLine() or anywhere else you could use a string. And yes, calling the short-hand getters/setters will encapsulate the compiler-generated private field. At run-time, the compiler-generated get/set methods will be called which will retrieve/set the private field. –  Jeremy Wiggins Jan 16 '12 at 2:41
1  
@AnkurSharma value is the value you are assigning to the property. Java doesn't implement properties like C# does, you would write getter/setter methods in java. So the equivalent setter method would be something like public void setName(String value) { this.name = value; }. In C#, the compiler does some magic for you - if you were to look at the IL after compilation, you would actually see a method very similar to the example from java. –  Jeremy Wiggins Jun 14 '13 at 12:36

I'm going to modify your question slightly to provide a better comparison. In Java you commonly have public getters and private setters, with the constructor being the initializor[sic] of the variable, such as:

public class Person{
    private String fName;

    public Person (String name) {
        setName(name);
    }

    private void setName(String someName){
        fName = someName;
    }

    String getName(){
        return fName;
    }
}

With a user of the class only being able to retrieve the value after initialization through the constructor:

public class Example {
    Person person = new Person("Fred");
    System.out.println(person.getName()); // Allowed
    System.out.println(person.fName); // Not allowed because fName is a local class variable
    person.setName("Aaron"); // Not allowed because setName() is a local class method
}

Now this is where C# can become confusing, as instead of using Person.getName you simply use the variable itself, however this variable can still be encapsulated. In Java you are taught that Class variables should be local (private) and should only be accessed with getters and setters. C# is essentially the same, but the syntax and logic is different. Rewriting my example in C# would be:

public class Person {
    public String fName {get; private set;}

    public Person(String name) {
        this.fName = name;
    }
}

public class Example {
    Person person = new Person("Fred");
    Console.WriteLine(person.fName); // This is allowed 
    person.fName = "Tony"; // Not allowed because setter is private
}

Now if you wanted to add logic to your getter and setter using the above conventions, you would need to introduce a local private variable, but the code in Example and your Person constructor wouldn't change:

class Person {
    private String _fName;
    public String fName {
        get { return _fName + ".addedText"; }
        private set { _fName = value.ToLower(); }
    }
    public Person(String fName) {
        this.fName = fName;
    }
}

Now whether this is better or worse than Java is somewhat debatable, but from what I've seen your code is going to be out of place in C# if you do something like the below, although syntax wise it will work:

class Person2 {
    private String fName;

    public Person2(string fName) {
        setFname(fName);
    }

    private void setFname(String fName) {
        this.fName = fName.ToLower();
    }

    public String getFname() {
        return this.fName+ ".addedText";
    }
}
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