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Which files in an Android project should be committed to a version control repository? Which files should not be committed?

Right now my .gitignore file consists of the following lines:

# Android generated files #
###########################
android.keystore
local.properties
bin/
gen/
libs/
obj/

# OS generated files #
######################
.DS_Store*
ehthumbs.db
Icon?
Thumbs.db

# Eclipse generated files #
###########################
.settings/org.eclipse.jdt.core.prefs

Am I missing anything?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 15 '12 at 17:39

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/5165688 –  meleyal May 21 '12 at 9:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

GitHub maintains an official list of recommended .gitignore files at this public repository.

For Android is this

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The general rule of thumb is to not commit any file that can be re-generated, into the repository. Having said that, you may want to add your project.properties file to .gitignore as well (if it exists).

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Doesn't the project.properties contain important project metadata. If you delete it you'll have trouble regenerating it. –  Ricardo Gladwell Aug 19 '12 at 8:53
    
@RicardoGladwell You can regenerate your project.properties using the following command in your project main directory: android update project --path . --target android-16 (or any other API level target) –  Nilhcem Dec 6 '12 at 14:48
2  
@Nilhcem that's a brittle, manual step that can easily be forgotten, you should commit your project.properties as part of your other source files. –  Ricardo Gladwell Dec 6 '12 at 23:21
1  
My rule is to not check in anything that is automatically created by the build procedure. If you can put "android update project..." in your Makefile (or equivalent), and it will be automatically created without problems any time it needs to be, then don't check it in. Otherwise, do check it in. –  Edward Falk May 18 '13 at 0:21
3  
At the top of project.properties -- "# This file must be checked in Version Control Systems." -- This file is important especially if you use Android Libraries, it maintains what libraries you have and their locations. Typically these libraries should be included with the source. –  Constantin Jul 5 '13 at 20:24

don't add bin folder and gen folder. They are not part of your sources they are generated. In future remember that you add only files necessary to build and run your project, and binary and generated files are not.

Yet if you're not using any tool like ivy or maven you may want your lib folder to present. Often when you use a library project, you also need to commit it

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1  
FYI, he's not committing either the bin or the gen folder. What you're seeing there is his .gitignore file. –  Marvin Pinto Jan 15 '12 at 19:12
1  
I haven't said he is doing that, i just noticed that it's the worst practice –  Orest Jan 15 '12 at 19:22
    
I've had to deal with a vendor who checked in all the .o and .pyc files. Every time I did a build, "git status" would generate thousands of lines of "changed" files. –  Edward Falk May 18 '13 at 0:26

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