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Short Version

The MSDN documentation for Type.GetProperties states that the collection it returns is not guaranteed to be in alphabetical or declaration order, though running a simple test shows that in general it is returned in declaration order. Are there specific scenarios that you know of where this is not the case? Beyond that, what is the suggested alternative?

Detailed Version

I realize the MSDN documentation for Type.GetProperties states:

The GetProperties method does not return properties in a particular order, such as alphabetical or declaration order. Your code must not depend on the order in which properties are returned, because that order varies.

so there is no guarantee that the collection returned by the method will be ordered any specific way. Based on some tests, I've found to the contrary that the properties returned appear in the order they're defined in the type.

Example:

class Simple
{
    public int FieldB { get; set; }
    public string FieldA { get; set; }
    public byte FieldC { get; set; }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Simple Properties:");
        foreach (var propInfo in typeof(Simple).GetProperties())
            Console.WriteLine("\t{0}", propInfo.Name);
    }
}

Output:

Simple Properties:
        FieldB
        FieldA
        FieldC

One such case that this differs only slightly is when the type in question has a parent who also has properties:

class Parent
{
    public int ParentFieldB { get; set; }
    public string ParentFieldA { get; set; }
    public byte ParentFieldC { get; set; }
}

class Child : Parent
{
    public int ChildFieldB { get; set; }
    public string ChildFieldA { get; set; }
    public byte ChildFieldC { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Parent Properties:");
        foreach (var propInfo in typeof(Parent).GetProperties())
            Console.WriteLine("\t{0}", propInfo.Name);

        Console.WriteLine("Child Properties:");
        foreach (var propInfo in typeof(Child).GetProperties())
            Console.WriteLine("\t{0}", propInfo.Name);

    }
}

Output:

Parent Properties:
        ParentFieldB
        ParentFieldA
        ParentFieldC
Child Properties:
        ChildFieldB
        ChildFieldA
        ChildFieldC
        ParentFieldB
        ParentFieldA
        ParentFieldC

Which means the GetProperties method walks up the inheritance chain from bottom up when discovering the properties. That's fine and can be handled as such.

Questions:

  1. Are there specific situations where the described behavior would differ that I've missed?
  2. If depending on the order is not recommended then what is the recommended approach?

One seemingly obvious solution would be to define a custom attribute which indicates the order in which the properties should appear (Similar to the Order property on the DataMember attribute). Something like:

public class PropOrderAttribute : Attribute
{
    public int SeqNbr { get; set; }
}

And then implement such as:

class Simple
{
    [PropOrder(SeqNbr = 0)]
    public int FieldB { get; set; }
    [PropOrder(SeqNbr = 1)]
    public string FieldA { get; set; }
    [PropOrder(SeqNbr = 2)]
    public byte FieldC { get; set; }
}

But as many have found, this becomes a serious maintenance problem if your type has 100 properties and you need to add one between the first 2.

UPDATE

The examples shown here are simply for demonstrative purposes. In my specific scenario, I define a message format using a class, then iterate through the properties of the class and grab their attributes to see how a specific field in the message should be demarshaled. The order of the fields in the message is significant so the order of the properties in my class needs to be significant.

It works currently by just iterating over the return collection from GetProperties, but since the documentation states it is not recommended I was looking to understand why and what other option do I have?

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? Why do you need an order? Perhaps there's some other way –  Elisha Jan 15 '12 at 18:37
1  
Basically, the documentation says "don't rely on an order", but in the current implementation it will probably have a consistent order. The documentation is accurate, "don't rely on an order" doesn't mean "it will vary". It means "it could vary". Q1: you cannot assume it will ever be as you've described again. Q2: don't rely on an order. Order it yourself if you need an ordered list. –  Kieren Johnstone Jan 15 '12 at 18:38
    
1. You totally should not depend on declaration order - that's for sure, as it depends on implementation of runtime (it could change even from version to version). –  Sergey A. Savenko Jan 15 '12 at 18:39
1  
2.Why won't you sort properties alphabetically? Or do you need some other sort order? –  Sergey A. Savenko Jan 15 '12 at 18:40
    
@KierenJohnstone - I've updated the question with the context of the question. What alternatives do I have? –  M.Babcock Jan 15 '12 at 19:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The order simply isn't guaranteed; whatever happens.... Happens.

Obvious cases where it could change:

  • anything that implements ICustomTypeDescriptor
  • anything with a TypeDescriptionProvider

But a more subtle case: partial classes. If a class is split over multiple files, the order of their usage is not defined at all. See Is the "textual order" across partial classes formally defined?

Of course, it isn't defined even for a single (non-partial) definition ;p

But imagine

File 1

partial class Foo {
     public int A {get;set;}
}

File 2

partial class Foo {
    public int B {get;set:}
}

There is no formal declaration order here between A and B. See the linked post to see how it tends to happen, though.


Re your edit; the best approach there is to specify the marshal info separately; a common approach would be to use a custom attribute that takes a numeric order, and decorate the members with that. You can then order based on this number. protobuf-net does something very similar, and frankly I'd suggest using an existing serialization library here:

[ProtoMember(n)]
public int Foo {get;set;}

Where "n" is an integer. In the case of protobuf-net specifically, there is also an API to specify these numbers separately, which is useful when the type is not under your direct control.

share|improve this answer
    
Those are good points. What's the alternative then? –  M.Babcock Jan 15 '12 at 18:38
1  
@M.Bancock what alternative? It explicitly says: don't depend on order –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '12 at 18:39
    
I've updated my question with more specific detail of what I am trying to achieve. –  M.Babcock Jan 15 '12 at 18:49
    
@M.Babcock I'll edit re that –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '12 at 19:07
    
Thank you for the clarification. –  M.Babcock Jan 15 '12 at 19:12

Relying on an implementation detail that is explicitly documented as being not guaranteed is a recipe for disaster.

The 'recommended approach' would vary depending on what you want to do with these properties once you have them. Just displaying them on the screen? MSDN docs group by member type (property, field, function) and then alphabetize within the groups.

If your message format relies on the order of the fields, then you'd need to either:

  1. Specify the expected order in some sort of message definition. Google protocol buffers works this way if I recall- the message definition is compiled in that case from a .proto file into a code file for use in whatever language you happen to be working with.

  2. Rely on an order that can be independently generated, e.g. alphabetical order.

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated my question with more specifics about why the property order is significant in my situation. –  M.Babcock Jan 15 '12 at 18:59

I use custom attributes to add the necessary metadata myself (it's used with a REST like service which consumes and returns CRLF delimited Key=Value pairs.

First, a custom attribute:

class ParameterOrderAttribute : Attribute
{
    public int Order { get; private set; }
    public ParameterOrderAttribute(int order)
    {
        Order = order;
    }
}

Then, decorate your classes:

class Response : Message
{
    [ParameterOrder(0)]
    public int Code { get; set; }
}

class RegionsResponse : Response 
{
    [ParameterOrder(1)]
    public string Regions { get; set; }
}

class HousesResponse : Response
{
    public string Houses { get; set; }
}

A handy method for converting a PropertyInfo into a sortable int:

    private int PropertyOrder(PropertyInfo propInfo)
    {
        int output;
        var orderAttr = (ParameterOrderAttribute)propInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ParameterOrderAttribute), true).SingleOrDefault();
        output = orderAttr != null ? orderAttr.Order : Int32.MaxValue;
        return output;
    }

Even better, write is as an extension:

static class PropertyInfoExtensions
{
    private static int PropertyOrder(this PropertyInfo propInfo)
    {
        int output;
        var orderAttr = (ParameterOrderAttribute)propInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ParameterOrderAttribute), true).SingleOrDefault();
        output = orderAttr != null ? orderAttr.Order : Int32.MaxValue;
        return output;
    }
}

Finally you can now query your Type object with:

        var props = from p in type.GetProperties()
                    where p.CanWrite
                    orderby p.PropertyOrder() ascending
                    select p;
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, complete answer :) Wish this was marked as the answer for the next person looking... –  kroolk Jun 21 '14 at 18:07
    
Thanks! Just read it again, no time to edit it now but GetOrder() would make a very nice extension method for PropertyInfo. Then it would be orderby p.Order() ascending and you wouldn't have to worry about scope. –  RoboJ1M Jun 23 '14 at 8:42

1:

I've spent the last day troubleshooting a problem in an MVC 3 project, and it all came down to this particular problem. It basically relied on the property order being the same throughout the session, but on some occations a few of the properties switched places, messing up the site.

First the code called Type.GetProperties() to define column names in a dynamic jqGrid table, something that in this case occurs once per page_load. Subsequent times the Type.GetProperties() method was called was to populate the actual data for the table, and in some rare instances the properties switched places and messed up the presentation completely. In some instances other properties that the site relied upon for a hierarchical subgrid got switched, i.e. you could no longer see the sub data because the ID column contained erroneous data. In other words: yes, this can definitely happen. Beware.

2:

If you need consistent order throughout the system session but not nessecarily exactly the same order for all sessions the workaround is dead simple: store the PropertyInfo[] array you get from Type.GetProperties() as a value in the webcache or in a dictionary with the type (or typename) as the cache/dictionary key. Subsequently, whenever you're about to do a Type.GetProperties(), instead substitute it for HttpRuntime.Cache.Get(Type/Typename) or Dictionary.TryGetValue(Type/Typename, out PropertyInfo[]). In this way you'll be guaranteed to always get the order you encountered the first time.

If you always need the same order (i.e. for all system sessions) I suggest you combine the above approach with some type of configuration mechanism, i.e. specify the order in the web.config/app.config, sort the PropertyInfo[] array you get from Type.GetProperties() according to the specified order, and then store it in cache/static dictionary.

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