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#include <iostream>

class SomeClass
{
 public: int *SomeNumber;

 SomeClass() { SomeNumber = new int; *SomeNumber = 5; }

 ~SomeClass() { delete SomeNumber; }
 int getSomeNumber(void) { return *SomeNumber; }

};

int main()
{

SomeClass A;
std:: cout << A.getSomeNumber() << std::endl; // outputs 5
std:: cout << A.SomeNumber << std::endl; // outputs SomeNumber address

return 0;
}

How can I get *SomeNumber, not its address, by not using the method getSomeNumber()? If SomeNumber were not a pointer to a int, I could get it with A.SomeNumber

Sorry If I were not clear enough. Thanks in advance.

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You are missing an assignment operator and copy constructor. –  pmr Jan 15 '12 at 18:51
1  
@pmr: And a copy constructor. See The Rule of Three. –  sbi Jan 15 '12 at 18:54
    
@sbi Why do you say that? ;) –  pmr Jan 15 '12 at 18:57
    
@pmr: Darn! Did I really post this within your 5mins edit period? I fell for a stupid beginner's prank... :) –  sbi Jan 15 '12 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Simple:

*A.SomeNumber

It works because . has higher precedence than *, so it's the same as

*(A.SomeNumber)
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Can't you just do:

std:: cout << (*A.SomeNumber) << std::endl;
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Avoid making your properties public!!!!

You could use visitor design pattern instead of this code like:

class SomeClass
{
 public: int *SomeNumber;

 SomeClass() { SomeNumber = new int; *SomeNumber = 5; }

 void visit( IVisitor* visitor ){ visitor->doSomething(*SomeNumber);}

 ~SomeClass() { delete SomeNumber; }
 int getSomeNumber(void) { return *SomeNumber; }

};

IVisitor is an interface you can implement it and anything you want.

share|improve this answer
3  
Maybe this toy example needs a SomeNumberFactory too, and a Decorator, and a dependency injection framework! –  Thomas Jan 15 '12 at 18:46
    
I am pretty sure that public member is a bad chose in any case. –  AlexTheo Jan 15 '12 at 18:47
    
@Thomas: You're forgetting an abstract wrapper and multiple dispatch. Call yourself a software developer... –  Kerrek SB Jan 15 '12 at 18:50
    
getter setters are bad chose too. –  AlexTheo Jan 15 '12 at 18:50

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