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I didn't fully understand the concept of threads I have some questions. Assume we have the following code:

ExecCommand.java

// I don't know how this work, for now
package therads;

// Here we will have the methods and run them from the Main.java
public class ExecCommand implements Runnable
{
    String name;
    int time;

    public ExecCommand(String s,int amount)
    {
        name = s;
        time = amount;
    }

    // Run method (Runnable)
    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            // What to execute when the thread is started
            System.out.printf("%s is sleeping for %d\n",name,time);
            Thread.sleep(time);
            System.out.printf("%s is done\n",name);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {

        }
    }

    // This dosen't work when the thread is stopped
    public void stop()
    {
        try
        {
            System.out.printf("STOPPED!");
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {

        }
    }

    // This dosen't work when the thread is started
    public void start()
    {
        try
        {
            System.out.printf("Started!");
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {

        }

    }
}

and i call him from :

Main.java

Thread t5 = new Thread(new ExecCommand("Good Function",1000));
t5.start();
  1. I want to println() "Started" when the thread is started and "Stopped" when it finished. It is possible?

  2. When a thread is completed, it dies, complete released from memory? If not, how i can do that?

  3. How can i make a thread that repeat itself like once every 1000 miliseconds till i press a key? I was thinking about while(true) { t5.start; }

but i don't know for sure.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First of all, there is no point in using the start and stop methods. Everything happens in the run method.

To print a message on start and stop, put them at the start and end of the run method. To loop indefinitely and keep executing code until an outside event happens, use a flag and loop on it:

class ThreadTask implements Runnable {
    private volatile boolean flag = false;

    public void setFlag(boolean value) {
        flag = value;
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Started");
        while(!flag) {
           // execute code
        }
        System.out.println("Stopped");
    }
}

Then when you want the thread to stop, just set the flag to true using setFlag.

And yes, threads are automatically cleaned up by the runtime + OS after the run method terminates.

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I would recommend that you add a try { ... } catch(InterruptedException e) ( ... } in the while loop, but this is the jist of it. –  Bob Kuhar Jan 15 '12 at 20:19
    
thank you, i will try it :) –  Master345 Jan 15 '12 at 20:21
    
it works perfectly, i also added how many times to repeat the thread –  Master345 Jan 15 '12 at 20:34
    
Thanks for good example.. can you please explain what is "value" in public void setFlag(boolean value) { flag = value; } –  Ankit Kumar Sep 6 '13 at 7:57

Why or when would you expect your .start() and .stop() to be called? Runnable has only a single method in the interface; .run(). The JavaDocs for Thread cover it pretty well. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Thread.html. If you want something to happen when your Thread starts, put that something at the top of your .run(). If you want something to happen when your Thread is finishing, put it at the bottom of the .run(). By-in-large doing anything with the .start() and .stop() methods on Thread is discouraged. Concentrate on doing all you lifecycle stuff within your .run(). And get a copy of "Java Concurrency in Practice" by Goetz. It will show you the full range of your options (including don't do you own Threading directly).

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Thanks for the answer, you made a huge logic in my head, but don't you think it's a bit cruel to read that big book? Making tutorials from that guy over youtube it's really fun :D –  Master345 Jan 15 '12 at 20:17
    
@RowMinds. For what JCiP covers, its really not that big. Getting Threading wrong can really screw up you program, JCiP will put your head in the right place for understanding how it works and this will allow you to wield it without fear. If you've found some videos that cover it as well, have at it. A picture is a thousand words, right? –  Bob Kuhar Jan 15 '12 at 20:23
    
you're not the first one to say that, i guess i have to read, even tough sometimes it gets very boring reading about programming, i rather read Shakespeare ... but if it must be done then that's it, thanks :) –  Master345 Jan 15 '12 at 20:33

You are not supposed to override the start and stop methods. They are not callback methods.

What you want is something akin to the SwingWorker class (assuming you are interested in UI related threading synchronization).

If not, you can subclass Thread yourself and provide a callback mechanism.

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so are you saying that there is no reason for start() and stop() ? –  Master345 Jan 15 '12 at 20:08
    
the start and stop methods are supposed to be called by you. they are not callback methods. –  Savvas Dalkitsis Jan 15 '12 at 21:04
  1. Yes of course. You can just print "Started" in the first line of your run() method, and print "Stopped" either in a finally section of run() method or just after t5.join()
  2. You are not told about the details, and cannot do anything. But you can assume the resources are freed as soon as necessary. (Of course if you have reachable links for any references allocated within your thread, JVM cannot decide that these are of no use, so "complete" is not a proper word here.)
  3. Take a look at java.util.Timer
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  1. If you prefer to use System.out.println instead of printf just change those lines of code. There's nothing thread-related about those calls.
  2. The thread will be collected and released from memory by the garbage collector when it has stopped running and there are no live references to it. Same as all objects.
  3. Don't override stop(). This has been deprecated and should really be dealt with by the JVM, not your application code. Just override run to implement whatever you want your thread to do, as per the docs
  4. You can use Thread.sleep to sleep for a period of time. How accurate the sleep will be will depend on your platform and the resolution of the available system clock.
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