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I have some data which can be represented by an unsigned Integral type and its biggest value requires 52 bits. AFAIK only Integer, Int64 and Word64 satisfy these requirements.

All the information I could find out about those types was that Integer is signed and has a floating unlimited bit-size, Int64 and Word64 are fixed and signed and unsigned respectively. What I coudn't find out was the information on the actual implementation of those types:

  1. How many bits will a 52-bit value actually occupy if stored as an Integer?

  2. Am I correct that Int64 and Word64 allow you to store a 64-bit data and weigh exactly 64 bits for any value?

  3. Are any of those types more performant or preferrable for any other reasons than size, e.g. native code implementations or direct processor instructions-related optimizations?

  4. And just in case: which one would you recommend for storing a 52-bit value in an application extremely sensitive in terms of performance?

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Note: On 32-bit systems (concerning GHC, Windows is 32 bits, even 64 bit Windows), most operations on Int64 or Word64 (and the unboxed variants) are implemented as foreign calls to C functions. That means that on 32-bit systems, using Integer has a realistic chance of being faster than the fixed-width 64-bits (+ constructor) types. If enough of the values actually fit in 32 bits, that's even likely to happen. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 15 '12 at 20:37
    
Is calling out to GMP really cheaper than a normal FFI call? It does indeed make sense if most of the values fit into 32 bits, though. –  ehird Jan 15 '12 at 20:38
    
@DanielFischer A very useful note, Daniel. I'll definitely have to take this into consideration. Thank you! Actually, as you might have guessed my system will have a <=32-bit value ~62% of the time (32/52). :) –  Nikita Volkov Jan 15 '12 at 21:48
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@Nikita At around 60%, I expect Int64/Word64 to be a bit faster than Integer, though the call to GMP is a bit cheaper than a generic unsafe ccall, the overhead of GMP representation can easily cost more. But I'm only making somewhat educated guesses here, measure to find out what's faster for your case. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 15 '12 at 22:02
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@NikitaVolkov That glib "(32/52)" statistic worries me. If your numbers are distributed uniformly, significantly more than 32/52 of them will have one of their top 20 bits turned on: there's a 1 in 2^20 chance that any given set of 20 bits are all off. For your statistic to make sense, the distribution of which is the first on bit would have to be uniform -- a very atypical distribution, I think. –  Daniel Wagner Jan 16 '12 at 0:35
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1 Answer

up vote 18 down vote accepted

How many bits will a 52-bit value actually occupy if stored as an Integer?

This is implementation-dependent. With GHC, values that fit inside a machine word are stored directly in a constructor of Integer, so if you're on a 64-bit machine, it should take the same amount of space as an Int. This corresponds to the S# constructor of Integer:

data Integer = S# Int#
             | J# Int# ByteArray#

Larger values (i.e. those represented with J#) are stored with GMP.

Am I correct that Int64 and Word64 allow you to store a 64-bit data and weigh exactly 64 bits for any value?

Not quite — they're boxed. An Int64 is actually a pointer to either an unevaluated thunk or a one-word pointer to an info table plus a 64-bit integer value. (See the GHC commentary for more information.)

If you really want something that's guaranteed to be 64 bits, no exceptions, then you can use an unboxed type like Int64#, but I would strongly recommend profiling first; unboxed values are quite painful to use. For instance, you can't use unboxed types as arguments to type constructors, so you can't have a list of Int64#s. You also have to use operations specific to unboxed integers. And, of course, all of this is extremely GHC-specific.

If you're looking to store a lot of 52-bit integers, you might want to use vector or repa (built on vector, with fancy things like automatic parallelism); they store the values unboxed under the hood, but let you work with them in boxed form. (Of course, each individual value you take out will be boxed.)

Are any of those types more performant or preferrable for any other reasons than size, e.g. native code implementations or direct processor instructions-related optimizations?

Yes; using Integer incurs a branch for every operation, since it has to distinguish the machine-word and bignum cases; and, of course, it has to handle overflow. Fixed-size integral types avoid this overhead.

And just in case: which one would you recommend for storing a 52-bit value in an application extremely sensitive in terms of performance?

If you're using a 64-bit machine: Int64 or, if you must, Int64#.

If you're using a 32-bit machine: Probably Integer, since on 32-bit Int64 is emulated with FFI calls to GHC functions that are probably not very highly optimised, but I'd try both and benchmark it. With Integer, you'll get the best performance on small integers, and GMP is heavily-optimised, so it'll probably do better on the larger ones than you might think.

You could select between Int64 and Integer at compile-time using the C preprocessor (enabled with {-# LANGUAGE CPP #-}); I think it would be easy to get Cabal to control a #define based on the word width of the target architecture. Beware, of course, that they are not the same; you will have to be careful to avoid "overflows" in the Integer code, and e.g. Int64 is an instance of Bounded but Integer is not. It might be simplest to just target a single word width (and thus type) for performance and live with the slower performance on the other.

I would suggest creating your own Int52 type as a newtype wrapper over Int64, or a Word52 wrapper over Word64 — just pick whichever matches your data better, there should be no performance impact; if it's just arbitrary bits I'd go with Int64, just because Int is more common than Word.

You can define all the instances to handle wrapping automatically (try :info Int64 in GHCi to find out which instances you'll want to define), and provide "unsafe" operations that just apply directly under the newtype for performance-critical situations where you know there won't be any overflow.

Then, if you don't export the newtype constructor, you can always swap the implementation of Int52 later, without changing any of the rest of your code. Don't worry about the overhead of a separate type — the runtime representation of a newtype is completely identical to the underlying type; they only exist at compile-time.

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I've gained a lot of useful information from your answer, thanks! I still have some questions though: 1. I'm not sure I understood you correctly: by avoiding a branch of extra operations did you imply rejecting Integer? 2. Do you believe that using fixed-length implementations will be more performant than Integer in all cases? 3. Isn't the [although questionable] economy of ~10 free bits worth something? 4. Daniel Fischer in comment to my question suggested to use Integer for better performance in 32-bit mode - what do you think about that? –  Nikita Volkov Jan 15 '12 at 21:52
    
@NikitaVolkov: I've expanded my answer to answer these. I don't quite understand #3, though — no value occupies less than a full machine word, and GMP allocates space for the bignums in machine words too. –  ehird Jan 15 '12 at 21:56
    
Thank you for the "machine word" comment. As embarassing as it is but being a self-educated programmer I didn't know that. I have one last question left: why did you prefer Int64 over Word64? –  Nikita Volkov Jan 16 '12 at 9:39
    
@NikitaVolkov: I've updated my answer again to answer that and give some additional suggestions :) –  ehird Jan 16 '12 at 15:11
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@NikitaVolkov: Unfortunately, that will mean that you can't define instances for any classes — so you'll be unable to use any generic code (e.g. working on any Bounded) with Int52, and you'll have to take special care to always use your own versions of every operation. The newtype wrapper is a bit of up-front effort, but will simplify things a lot in the long run; you can still use numeric literals, etc. thanks to Haskell's polymorphic literals. –  ehird Jan 16 '12 at 16:02
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