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I have some code that roughly does this inside of a GAE worker task:

list_of_dicts = xmlrpc_call(...)
objects_to_put = []

for row in list_of_dicts.items():
    object = DatastoreModel(**row)
    object.x = ...
    objects_to_put.append(object)

db.put(objects_to_put)

I've also tried this:

list_of_dicts = xmlrpc_call(...)
objects_to_put = []

for row in list_of_dicts.items():
    object = DatastoreModel(**row)
    object.x = ...
    objects_to_put.append(object)
    if len(objects_to_put) > 10:
        db.put(objects_to_put)
        objects_to_put = []
db.put(objects_to_put)

(The idea being to put every 10 objects, to avoid having a huge list)

The problem, invariably, is that this block of code apparently takes up vast sums of memory, even though the list is relatively small (~100 items) and each item in the last contains just a few keys. There are no big blobs, big chunks of string, or anything but relatively small potatoes data structures here.

What's causing this worker to exceed its memory quota every time it runs and how can I efficiently create a relatively large (~100 or so) number of datastore objects?

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1  
Is this the only thing the request does? Are you sure this is the culprit? What about other handlers? –  Nick Johnson Jan 15 '12 at 22:59
    
It's clearly this request, yes. I haven't entirely ruled out the possibility of something else going hayware in that request, but that seems quite unlikely. It's a worker request that simply pulls in some xmlrpc, and turns it into datastrore objects. –  Ken Jan 16 '12 at 22:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the second method and add the del keywords would be better. But it is hard to say it can solve your questions.

list_of_dicts = xmlrpc_call(...)
objects_to_put = []

for row in list_of_dicts.items():
    object = DatastoreModel(**row)
    object.x = ...
    objects_to_put.append(object)
    if len(objects_to_put) > 10:
        db.put_async(objects_to_put)
        del objects_to_put[:]

db.put_async(objects_to_put)

There is an AppTrace tool that can trace the memory usage in development server. However, it only runs on development server. http://code.google.com/p/apptrace/wiki/UsingApptrace

Since apptrace is meant for development and debugging purposes only, it works with the development appserver of the Google App Engine Python SDK and TyphoonAE. It will definitely not work on the GAE production environment.

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That looks like what I want to try using. Thanks. –  Ken Jan 16 '12 at 22:17

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