Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to deserialize an NSString of JSON into objects via RestKit? I checked the API list here and could not find something that would serve for this purpose. The closest I could find are the various parser classes that return NSDictionary after parsing the input. I assume RestKit uses these parsers after downloading the response so my thinking is that the functionality is available somewhere in RestKit but not exposed publicly.

If I am not missing anything and this functionality is not exposed, what would be the alternatives? Two obvious ones do not look very promising: Get the resulting NSDictionary and try to deserialize myself (effectively reimplementing RestKit) or try to dive into RestKit source and see if this can be somehow exposed (looks tedious and error prone).

Thanks in advance for any help.

PS: The idea is that a string property on a deserialized object is actually the JSON representation of another set of objects (embedded JSON in a sense) and it is deserialized on demand during runtime.

share|improve this question
add comment

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Pretty "simple":

NSString *stringJSON;
...

RKJSONParserJSONKit *parser;
NSError *error= nil;
parser= [[[RKJSONParserJSONKit alloc] init] autorelease]; 
MyManagedObject *target;
target= [MyManagedObject object];

NSDictionary *objectAsDictionary;
RKObjectMapper* mapper;
objectAsDictionary= [parser objectFromString:stringJSON error:&error];
mapper = [RKObjectMapper mapperWithObject:objectAsDictionary 
                          mappingProvider:[RKObjectManager sharedManager].mappingProvider];
mapper.targetObject = target;
RKObjectMappingResult* result = [mapper performMapping];
NSLog(@"%@", [result asObject]);
share|improve this answer
add comment

As of RestKit 0.20.0-pre2

NSString* JSONString = @"{ \"name\": \"The name\", \"number\": 12345}";
NSString* MIMEType = @"application/json";
NSError* error;
NSData *data = [JSONString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
id parsedData = [RKMIMETypeSerialization objectFromData:data MIMEType:MIMEType error:&error];
if (parsedData == nil && error) {
    // Parser error...
}

AppUser *appUser = [[AppUser alloc] init];

NSDictionary *mappingsDictionary = @{ @"someKeyPath": someMapping };
RKMapperOperation *mapper = [[RKMapperOperation alloc] initWithRepresentation:parsedData mappingsDictionary:mappingsDictionary];
mapper.targetObject = appUser;
NSError *mappingError = nil;
BOOL isMapped = [mapper execute:&mappingError];
if (isMapped && !mappingError) {
    // Yay! Mapping finished successfully
    NSLog(@"mapper: %@", [mapper representation]);
    NSLog(@"firstname is %@", appUser.firstName);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you know perhaps how to do this from an already configured RKObjectManager? –  Grzegorz Adam Hankiewicz Mar 18 '13 at 23:35
    
Is this what you're looking for? github.com/RestKit/… –  Collin Price Mar 19 '13 at 1:05
    
I'm looking at github.com/RestKit/RestKit/issues/1286 without success. –  Grzegorz Adam Hankiewicz Mar 19 '13 at 9:50
add comment

This works for Restkit 0.21.0:

NSString* jsonFilePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"fileName"
                                                 ofType:@"json"];

NSString* JSONString = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:jsonFilePath
                                              encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding
                                                 error:NULL];


NSError* error;
NSData *data = [JSONString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
id parsedData = [RKMIMETypeSerialization objectFromData:data MIMEType:RKMIMETypeJSON error:&error];
if (parsedData == nil && error) {
    // Parser error...
}

//_objectManager is RKObjectManager instance
NSMutableDictionary *mappingsDictionary = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
for (RKResponseDescriptor *descriptor in _objectManager.responseDescriptors) {
    [mappingsDictionary setObject:descriptor.mapping forKey:descriptor.keyPath];
}

RKMapperOperation *mapper = [[RKMapperOperation alloc] initWithRepresentation:parsedData mappingsDictionary:mappingsDictionary];
NSError *mappingError = nil;
BOOL isMapped = [mapper execute:&mappingError];
if (isMapped && !mappingError) {
    NSLog(@"result %@",[mapper mappingResult]);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

A more iOS 5+ oriented answer:

NSString* JSONString = jsonString;
NSString* MIMEType = @"application/json";
NSError* error = nil;
id<RKParser> parser = [[RKParserRegistry sharedRegistry] parserForMIMEType:MIMEType];
id parsedData = [parser objectFromString:JSONString error:&error];
if (parsedData == nil && error) {
    NSLog(@"ERROR: JSON parsing error");
}

RKObjectMappingProvider* mappingProvider = [RKObjectManager sharedManager].mappingProvider;
RKObjectMapper* mapper = [RKObjectMapper mapperWithObject:parsedData mappingProvider:mappingProvider];
RKObjectMappingResult* result = [mapper performMapping];
if (result) {

    NSArray *resultArray = result.asCollection;

    MyObject *object = [resultArray lastObject];
    NSLog(@"My Object: %@", object);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This works for Restkit 0.20, using Core Data Entities. It is based in the solution given by @innerself

NSString* jsonFilePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"info-base"
                                                         ofType:@"json"];

NSString* JSONString = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:jsonFilePath
                                                 encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding
                                                    error:NULL];


NSError *error = nil;

NSData *data = [JSONString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
id parsedData = [RKMIMETypeSerialization objectFromData:data MIMEType:RKMIMETypeJSON error:&error];
if (parsedData == nil && error) {
    // Parser error...
    NSLog(@"parse error");
}

//_objectManager is RKObjectManager instance
NSMutableDictionary *mappingsDictionary = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
for (RKResponseDescriptor *descriptor in [RKObjectManager sharedManager].responseDescriptors) {

    [mappingsDictionary setObject:descriptor.mapping forKey:descriptor.keyPath];
}

RKManagedObjectMappingOperationDataSource *datasource = [[RKManagedObjectMappingOperationDataSource alloc]
                                                         initWithManagedObjectContext:[RKManagedObjectStore defaultStore].persistentStoreManagedObjectContext
                                                                                cache:[RKManagedObjectStore defaultStore].managedObjectCache];

RKMapperOperation *mapper = [[RKMapperOperation alloc] initWithRepresentation:parsedData
                                                           mappingsDictionary:mappingsDictionary];
[mapper setMappingOperationDataSource:datasource];

NSError *mappingError = nil;
BOOL isMapped = [mapper execute:&mappingError];
if (isMapped && !mappingError) {
    // data is in [mapper mappingResult]
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

For Restkit 0.22, You can use this code. This returns an RKMappingResult wherein you can enumerate the objects after mapping using the property .array.

- (RKMappingResult *)mapJSONStringWithString:(NSString *)jsonString
{
     RKMappingResult *result = nil;

     NSError* error;
     NSData *data = [jsonString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
     id parsedData = [RKMIMETypeSerialization objectFromData:data MIMEType:RKMIMETypeJSON error:&error];
     if (parsedData == nil && error) {
        NSLog(@"json mapping error");
     }

     NSDictionary *mappingsDictionary = @{@"":[CustomMappingClass getMappingForUsers]};

     ObjectClass *obj = [ObjectClass new];
     RKMapperOperation *mapper = [[RKMapperOperation alloc] initWithRepresentation:parsedData mappingsDictionary:mappingsDictionary];
     NSError *mappingError = nil;
     mapper.targetObject = obj;
     BOOL isMapped = [mapper execute:&mappingError];
     if (isMapped && !mappingError) {
         result = [mapper mappingResult];
     }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Is this not what you're looking for? http://restkit.org/api/0.10.0/Classes/RKJSONParserJSONKit.html

share|improve this answer
    
I am aware of these parser classes. They parse the string into NSDictionary which is the first part of the whole deserialization process. I need the functionality that takes a string and outputs the mapped objects. In other words, out of the three things that RestKit does in sequence (download response, parse the downloaded string, map objects), I need something that does the last two only. –  alokoko Jan 16 '12 at 10:10
    
Hey, I've got the same problem. I've got some JSON I need to map to my model (NSManagedObject). Did you find any solution for that? –  Mike Bevz Jan 21 '12 at 13:10
    
@MikeBevz: I wrote my own mapper. :-) I wrote more details as an answer to this question. –  alokoko Jan 21 '12 at 22:00
    
The link no longer seems to work –  Besi Jul 10 '12 at 7:04
    
The API docs had been moved. I've fixed it. –  Nick Lockwood Jul 10 '12 at 15:09
add comment

Judging by the views without any answers, it seems this facility does not exist in RestKit yet. Instead of spending more time trying to figure out how to do the mapping, I wrote my own mapper using the output of JsonKit parser and removed the dependency on RestKit (used the builtin classes for network activity). Right now my mapper is not generic (it has a few dependencies on how the objects are laid out and their names in json) but it works for the purposes of the project. I might come back later and turn it into a more generic object mapping library later on.

EDIT: This was selected answer because there was no other answer as of this answer's date (Jan 21, 2012). Since then, I stopped working on iOS and never visited this question again. Now I am selecting Ludovic's answer because of another user's comment and the upvotes for that answer.

share|improve this answer
2  
Why is this the selected answer? Ludovic's solution works great! –  Kyle Clegg Aug 18 '12 at 0:24
    
@Kyle: This was selected answer because there was no other answer as of this answer's date (Jan 21, 2012). Since then, I stopped working on iOS and never visited this question again. Even though I have no means to verify the answer myself at the moment, I am selecting Ludovic's answer because of your comment. –  alokoko Jan 27 '13 at 0:25
add comment

You can see how RestKit does this internally in the RKManagedObjectResponseMapperOperation class.

There are three stages of this operation.

The first is to parse the JSON string into NSDictionarys, NSArrays, etc. This is the easiest part.

id parsedData = [RKMIMETypeSerialization objectFromData:data
                                               MIMEType:RKMIMETypeJSON
                                                  error:error];

Next you need to run a mapping operation to convert this data into your NSManagedObjects. This is a bit more involved.

__block NSError *blockError = nil;
__block RKMappingResult *mappingResult = nil;
NSOperationQueue *operationQueue = [[NSOperationQueue alloc] init];
operationQueue.maxConcurrentOperationCount = 1;

[[RKObjectManager sharedManager].managedObjectStore.persistentStoreManagedObjectContext performBlockAndWait:^{

Remember to replace this dictionary with your own mappings. The key [NSNull null] maps this object from the root.

    NSDictionary *mappings = @{[NSNull null]: [jotOfflineRequestStatus mapping]};

    RKMapperOperation *mapper = [[RKMapperOperation alloc] initWithRepresentation:parsedData
                                                               mappingsDictionary:mappings];

    RKManagedObjectMappingOperationDataSource *dataSource = [[RKManagedObjectMappingOperationDataSource alloc]
                                                             initWithManagedObjectContext:[RKManagedObjectStore defaultStore].persistentStoreManagedObjectContext
                                                             cache:[RKManagedObjectStore defaultStore].managedObjectCache];
    dataSource.operationQueue = operationQueue;
    dataSource.parentOperation = mapper;
    mapper.mappingOperationDataSource = dataSource;

    [mapper start];
    blockError = mapper.error;
    mappingResult = mapper.mappingResult;
}];

You now need to run the tasks that have been put into the operationQueue we created. It is at this stage that connections to existing NSManagedObjects are made.

if ([operationQueue operationCount]) {
    [operationQueue waitUntilAllOperationsAreFinished];
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.