Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm just getting into JavaScript and I'm trying to wrap my head around prototypal inheritance. It appears that there's multiple ways to achieve the same effect, so I wanted to see if there is any best practices or reasons to do things one way over the other. Here's what I'm talking about:

// Method 1
function Rabbit() {
    this.name = "Hoppy";

    this.hop = function() {
        console.log("I am hopping!");
    }
}

// Method 2
function Rabbit() {}

Rabbit.prototype = {
    name: "Hoppy",

    hop: function() {
        console.log("I am hopping!");
    }
}

// Method 3
function Rabbit() {
    this.name = "Hoppy";
}

Rabbit.prototype.hop = function() {
    console.log("I am hopping!");
}

// Testing code (each method tested with others commented out)
var rabbit = new Rabbit();
console.log("rabbit.name = " + rabbit.name);        
rabbit.hop();

All of these appear to have the same effect individually (unless I'm missing something). So is one method preferred over the other? How do you do it?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you put a method on the prototype, every instance object shares the same reference to the method. If you have 10 instances, there is 1 copy of the method.

When you do what you did in example 1, every instance object has its own version of the same method, so if you create 10 of your objects, there are 10 copies of the code running around.

Using the prototype works because javascript has machinery for associated a function execution with a instance, i.e. it sets the this property for the execution of the function.

So using the prototype is highly preferred since it uses less space (unless of course, that is what you want).

In method 2, you are setting the prototype by setting it equal to an object literal. Note that here you are setting a property, which I think you don't intend to do, since all instances will get the same property.

In Method 3, you are building the prototype one assignment at a time.

I prefer method 3 for all things. i.e. In my constructor I set my property values

myObj = function(p1){
   this.p1; // every instance will probably have its own value anyway.
}

myObj.prototype.method1 = function(){..} // all instances share the same method, but when invoked  **this** has the right scope.
share|improve this answer
2  
While I like this answer (that's how I view it), certain famous JavaScript advocates would argue that it's better to have "private" methods.... –  user166390 Jan 15 '12 at 23:05
1  
@pst "private" methods are useless if they infer a runtime penalty. –  Raynos Jan 15 '12 at 23:11
1  
@Raynos True, but not useless if the penalty is negligible (in low instantion or other low overhead environments). Depends on the situation and overly simplistic to say method 1 is always bad. –  glortho Jan 15 '12 at 23:17
2  
@Jed meh, It kills testability, it kills extendability, it's a pain for change, and it's no better then underscore prefixed properties. All the negatives, none of the benefits. –  Raynos Jan 15 '12 at 23:21
1  
A function's this keyword has nothing to do with scope. –  RobG Jan 15 '12 at 23:22
show 5 more comments

Let's look at your examples one at a time. First:

function Rabbit() {
    this.name = "Hoppy";

    this.hop = function() { //Every instance gets a copy of this method...
        console.log("I am hopping!");
    }
}
var rabbit = new Rabbit();

The above code will work, as you have said in your question. It will create a new instance of the Rabbit class. Every time you create an instance, a copy of the hop method will be stored in memory for that instance.

The second example looked like this:

function Rabbit() {}

Rabbit.prototype = {
    name: "Hoppy",

    hop: function() { //Now every instance shares this method :)
        console.log("I am hopping!");
    }
}
var rabbit = new Rabbit();

This time, every instance of Rabbit will share a copy of the hop method. That's much better as it uses less memory. However, every Rabbit will have the same name (assuming you don't shadow the name property in the constructor). This is because the method is inherited from the prototype. In JavaScript, when you try to access a property of an object, that property will first be searched for on the object itself. If it's not found there, we look at the prototype (and so on, up the prototype chain until we reach an object whose prototype property is null).

Your third example is pretty much the way I would do it. Methods shared between instances should be declared on the prototype. Properties like name, which you may well want to set in the constructor, can be declared on a per-instance basis:

function Rabbit(rabbitName) {
    this.name = rabbitName;
}
Rabbit.prototype.hop = function() {
    console.log("Hopping!");
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is an important issue that is often misunderstood. It depends what you're trying to do. Generally speaking, hvgotcode's answer is right on. Any object that will be instantiated frequently should attach methods and properties to the prototype.

But there are advantages to the others in very specific situations. Read this, including the comments: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/javascript-ajax/stop-nesting-functions-but-not-all-of-them/

There are occasions when method 1 above helps, enabling you to have "private" readable/writable properties and methods. While this often isn't worth the sacrifice in heavily instantiated objects, for objects instantiated only once or a few times, or without many internal assignments, or if you're in a dev team environment with lots of different skill levels and sensibilities, it can be helpful.

Some devs incorporate another good strategy that attempts to bridge some of the shortcomings of the others. That is:

var Obj = function() {
    var private_read_only = 'value';

    return {
        method1: function() {},
        method2: function() {}
    };
};
share|improve this answer
add comment
// option 4
var Rabbit {
    constructor: function () {
        this.name = "Hoppy";
        return this;
    },

    hop: function() {
        console.log("I am hopping!");
    }
};

var rabbit = Object.create(Rabbit).constructor();
console.log("rabbit.name = " + rabbit.name);        
rabbit.hop();

When doing prototypical OO using new and constructor functions is completely optional.

As has already been noted, if you can share something through the prototype do so. Prototypes are more efficient memory wise and they are cheaper in terms of instantiation time.

However a perfectly valid alternative would be

function Rabbit() {
    // for some value of extend https://gist.github.com/1441105
    var r = extend({}, Rabbit);
    r.name = "Hoppy";
    return r;
}

Here your extending "instances" with the properties of the "prototype". The only advantage real prototypical OO has is that it's a live link, meaning that changes to the prototype reflect to all instances.

share|improve this answer
1  
for option 4 note that Object.create is only available starting with ECMAScript 5 (there are polyfills you could use though) –  vitorbal Jul 27 '12 at 13:37
add comment

Do some performance testing (declare around 1 milion rabbit variables) . First method will be the most time and memory consuming.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.