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So I know the basics here - an object is eligible for garbage collection when it's no longer reachable by a root (i.e. a strong reference either from a local variable in a stack frame or a static reference)

The question I have is about this potential optimization where, even if an object is referenced from a local variable, it may be garbage collected at any point in a function where the variable is no longer referenced. First - it appears that existing implementations of C# don't do this - both 2.0 and 4.0 seem to keep local references "live" until the stack frame is destroyed. But - I'd also like to write code that is still robust if and when garbage collection is optimized in later versions of the CLR.

So - without further ado, here's some code illustration:

class Foo 
{
  ...
}
class Program
{
    public static void fxn1(int blah) 
    {
      ...
    }
    public static void fxn2(Foo foo)
    {
      ...
    }
    public static int ToInt(Foo foo)
    {
      ...
    }
    public static void Main()
    {
      ...
      Foo foo = new Foo();
      fxn2(foo); // I THINK foo may not be GC'ed until fxn2 returns...
        // I THINK foo may be GC'ed here, even though CLR2.0 and CLR4.0 don't...
        //  (experiment shows CLR 2.0 and 4.0 leave foo "live" until Main returns)
      fxn2(new Foo()); // I THINK the argument can't be GC'ed until fxn2 returns...
        // I KNOW that even CLR2.0 and CLR4.0 will GC the argument after the return...
      fxn1( ToInt(new Foo()) ); // I KNOW that new Foo is GC'able even within fxn1...
    }
}

So ultimately, the rules for existing CLR's seem to be: 1. any object is "live" for the duration of a function call for which it is an immediate argument 2. any object is "live" for the duration of a function call if it is referenced by a local stack variable that is not reassigned. (even if the stack variable may not be referenced for several instructions at the end of the function)

However - apparently C# reserves the right to modify (2) so that an object is "live" up until the final use of a reference within a function.

Would this mean:

Foo foo = new Foo();
Foo foo2 = new Foo();
fxn2(foo); // foo is NOT GC'able until fxn1 returns?
   // foo IS GC'able from here on? (b/c no further uses of local "foo"?)
fxn2(foo2); // foo2 is NOT GC'able within fxn2 ?
fxn1(ToInt(foo2)); // foo2 IS GC'able within fxn1 ? (existing CLR does not GC foo2)

Is there anything in the ECMA spec which deals w/ garbage collection eligibility in detail?

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Just an idea. You can add Thread.Sleep(10000) call to the fxn2 to and then analyze if foo object is "live". –  alexander Jan 15 '12 at 23:46
2  
Section 8.4 of the C# ECMA spec discusses automatic memory management. It is pretty involved though. –  M.Babcock Jan 15 '12 at 23:51
    
@alexander - yup - GC.Collect() + Sleep() was my method for experimentally determining that stack variables that are still in the scope of the function remain "live". –  Kevin Jan 18 '12 at 19:51
    
@M.Babcock - Thank you for the link to the ECMA spec! 8.4 was actually too general, but the answer I was looking for was in 10.9 - and is identical to Java - when a variable can be no longer referenced by any possible future code path, then it is considered eligible for garbage collection - which means that although the existing clr implementation seems to scope local variable lifetime to the stack, there's no guarantee that third party or future implementations will do so. –  Kevin Jan 18 '12 at 19:55
    
Did you test a debug or a release build? GC behaves very differently between the two and in my experience the CLR will reclaim objects similar to foo in your example. However, keep in mind that this is an implementation detail. –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 30 '12 at 17:37

3 Answers 3

Well, it's impossible to give a general answer here, as when things actually become eligible for GC completely depends on your runtime's implementation.

The only thing you can trust are the guarantees - i.e., as long as an object is referenced from the stack, it won't be collected.

You cannot tell from the code when a local variable is removed from the stack, though - this is prone to compiler optimizations - in the static compiler as well as in the jitter.

So whatever may be a precise answer now may not be anymore after the next minor update of your runtime - it's usually best to write code that does not depend on such subtleties, which can only be found out by experiment, and instead relies on the runtime's guaranties only.

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Thanks for your response, yeoman - I was indeed looking for the standard's guarantees, rather than just relying on experiment with a particular runtime implementation. I think the answer is as referenced above in 10.9 of the ECMA spec... –  Kevin Jan 18 '12 at 19:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

@M.Babcock - Thank you for the link to the ECMA spec! 8.4 was actually too general, but the answer I was looking for was in 10.9 - and is identical to Java - when a variable can be no longer referenced by any possible future code path, then it is considered eligible for garbage collection - which means that although the existing clr implementation seems to scope local variable lifetime to the stack, there's no guarantee that third party or future implementations will do so.

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You refer to the idea of a potential optimization by collecting an object sooner.
I don't see this as an optimization.

Its not as if the computer runs faster or better if it has more free memory.

Either an allocation succeeds or fails.
If it succeeds, the process is running fine.
If it fails, the process is in trouble.
(anything from trivial-trouble, which it can recover from, to deep-trouble which results in process termination)

I just don't see the point in being more aggressive about G.C. as you describe. It would only help in the boundary case where you're already running with 99.99% of memory allocated. And in that case, you're deep into virtual memory, and paging to disk in a crazy fashion.

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If a garbage-collected framework is running on the same system as other applications which aren't using that same garbage collector, any memory which is used by the GC pool will be memory that can't be used by the other applications. –  supercat Oct 30 '12 at 3:00
    
@abelenky: "Its not as if the computer runs faster or better if it has more free memory". That's actually quite wrong. Firstly, recycling memory more aggressively improves cache locality which can dramatically improve performance. Secondly, GC work scales with the amount of used memory (e.g. for evacuating survivors in a generational GC) so reducing the amount of memory in use reduces the CPU time spent in the GC. –  Jon Harrop Jan 6 '13 at 11:33
    
@supercat: Only roughly speaking. In practice applications running in separate processes won't share pages. –  Jon Harrop Jan 6 '13 at 11:34
    
@JonHarrop: I'm unclear what the disagreement is. On a machine with 3 gigs of memory for applications, if there are two applications using separate garbage collectors, each of which has a 0.5 gig live set and a separate GC, with both GC's adjusting their collection frequency so that their memory pools are 4x their live set, it will likely be necessary for stuff to get swapped out to disk. If the applications sized their memory pools to 3x their live sets, swapping could be completely avoided even if collections had to be more frequent. –  supercat Jan 6 '13 at 16:45
    
@supercat Absolutely but if you repeat with fractions of a page (e.g. on application uses 1kB, the other 2kB) then it no longer works that way because the applications get larger slabs from the OS to allocate within. That's all I meant. The basic idea is perfectly ok. –  Jon Harrop Jan 6 '13 at 20:33

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