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I am writing a program in go that executes a server like program (also go). Now I want to have the stdout of the child program in my terminal window where I started the parent program. One way to do this is with the cmd.Output() function, but this prints the stdout only after the process has exited. (Thats a problem because this server-like program runs for a long time and I want to read the log output)

The variable out is of type io.ReadCloser and I don't know what I should do with it to achieve my task, and I can't find anything helpful on the web on this topic.

func main() {
    cmd := exec.Command("/path/to/my/child/program")
    out, err := cmd.StdoutPipe()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    err = cmd.Start()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    //fmt.Println(out)
    cmd.Wait()
} 

Explaination to the code: uncomment the Println function to get the code to compile, I know that Println(out io.ReadCloser) is not a meaningful function. (it produces the output &{3 |0 0} ) These two lines are just required to get the code to compile.

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1  
Your "exec" line of the import statement should be "os/exec". –  Johnson May 6 '13 at 12:43
    
thanks for the info, actually it was only exec pre go1, now its in os. updated it for go1 –  mbert May 21 '13 at 15:14
1  
I don't think that you actually need to call io.Copy within go routines –  rmonjo Aug 24 '13 at 22:32
    
I don't think you need to call cmd.Wait() or the for{} loop... why are these here? –  weberc2 Mar 7 '14 at 20:13
    
@weberc2 for this look down to elimisteve's answer. The for loop is not needed if you just want to run the program once. But if you don't call cmd.Wait(), your main() may end before your called program finishes, and you don't get the output you want –  mbert Mar 8 '14 at 11:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Now I want to have the stdout of the child program in my terminal window where I started the parent program.

No need to mess with pipes or goroutines, this one is easy.

func main() {
    // Replace `ls` (and its arguments) with something more interesting
    cmd := exec.Command("ls", "-l")
    cmd.Stdout = os.Stdout
    cmd.Stderr = os.Stderr
    cmd.Run()
}
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12  
+1: I wish this example was in docs –  tidwall Sep 25 '13 at 21:06
1  
In addition, if you want the command to listen for input you can simply set cmd.Stdin = os.Stdin thereby making it as if you had literally executed that command from your shell. –  Nucleon May 28 '14 at 0:49
    
Have saved a lot of time and potential grief here because of your great answer. Thank you! –  alphazero Jul 17 '14 at 14:54
1  
For those looking to redirect to log instead of stdout, there is an answer here –  Rick Smith Aug 7 '14 at 22:55

I believe that if you import io and os and replace this:

//fmt.Println(out)

with this:

go io.Copy(os.Stdout, out)

(see documentation for io.Copy and for os.Stdout), it will do what you want. (Disclaimer: not tested.)

By the way, you'll probably want to capture standard-error as well, by using the same approach as for standard-output, but with cmd.StderrPipe and os.Stderr.

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1  
thank you, I didn't realize that it could be that easy :) - go is great (read c++ articles on that problem...) –  mbert Jan 16 '12 at 13:22
    
@mbert: You're welcome! Embarrassingly, I have to admit that I've never actually used Go, but yeah, it seems pretty awesome. :-) –  ruakh Jan 16 '12 at 14:20
    
why do you know about this then? you should really try it! –  mbert Jan 16 '12 at 23:36
1  
@mbert: I had used enough other languages, and had read enough about Go, to have a hunch for what feature would likely exist to do this, and in approximately what form; then I just had to look through the relevant package-docs (found by Googling) to confirm that my hunch was correct, and to find the necessary details. The hardest parts were (1) finding what standard-output is called (os.Stdout) and (2) confirming the premise that, if you don't call cmd.StdoutPipe() at all, the standard-output goes to /dev/null rather than to the parent-process's standard-output. –  ruakh Jan 17 '12 at 0:14

For those who don't need this in a loop, but would like the command output to echo into the terminal without having cmd.Wait() blocking other statements:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "log"
    "os"
    "os/exec"
)

func checkError(err error) {
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalf("Error: %s", err)
    }
}

func main() {
    // Replace `ls` (and its arguments) with something more interesting
    cmd := exec.Command("ls", "-l")

    // Create stdout, stderr streams of type io.Reader
    stdout, err := cmd.StdoutPipe()
    checkError(err)
    stderr, err := cmd.StderrPipe()
    checkError(err)

    // Start command
    err = cmd.Start()
    checkError(err)

    // Don't let main() exit before our command has finished running
    defer cmd.Wait()  // Doesn't block

    // Non-blockingly echo command output to terminal
    go io.Copy(os.Stdout, stdout)
    go io.Copy(os.Stderr, stderr)

    // I love Go's trivial concurrency :-D
    fmt.Printf("Do other stuff here! No need to wait.\n\n")
}
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Minor fyi: (Obviously) you might miss results of the goroutines started if your "do other stuff here" completes faster than the goroutines. The main() exiting will cause the goroutines to end as well. so you could potentially not end up actually outputing to echo in the terminal if you don't wait for the cmd to finish. –  galaktor Jan 13 '14 at 9:40
    
Yup, good point. –  elimisteve Jan 14 '14 at 0:05

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