Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Input form on my website for comments. I have some silly users creating a whole lot of blank whitespace by pressing enter [space] enter [space] or lots of enters etc In PHP, how do I preserve legit single enter or double 'enter enter', but remove any other combinations with spaces inbetween. eg, This is OK:

\n\n

This is NOT:

\n\n\n...
\n\n \n...
\n \n \n...
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Finally got it working and tested. I decided to break the process in two passes of replaces to keep the regex code simple (you can combine both if you desire).

First one (/\n | {1,} | \n/) will look for any random combination of spaces and \n characters, leaving the solo \n.

Second one ('/(?<=\n{2})\n*/') makes use of look behind feature to match any group of \ncharacters that follows any '\n\n' (double new line sequence).

Testing:

$string ="
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
\n
\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
\n
\n
\n
.\n
\n
..\n
.....\n
.\n
...\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet";

$string = preg_replace('/\n | {1,} | \n/', '', $string);
$string = preg_replace('/(?<=\n{2})\n*/', '', $string);
echo $string;

Output:

Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet\n
\n
Loren Ipsum Dolor Sit Amet

I'm not a regex guru, but I think it already solves the problem decently.

share|improve this answer
$new_text = preg_replace('/\n\s+\n/','\n',$original_text)`

handles:

  • more than two \n in a row (note \s is [ \r\t\n] so this pattern includes anything that matches \n{3,})
  • \n with whitespace in between followed by another \n. The \s+ is greedy so will grab as many intermediate spaces and \n as it can.

Note that this regex replaces any part of the string that contains at least two \ns, except for \n\n (which you wanted to be preserved).

EDIT (thanks to @AlanMoore, see comments below): It replaces these "too many \n" occurences with a single \n rather than removes them entirely as your original question specified. This is because if the input string was foo\n\n\nbar it seems like you'd rather have foo\nbar than foobar as the result string.

If you do indeed want to remove all these occurences entirely, just replace with '' above instead of \n.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but shouldn't the replacement string be '\n\n'? Also, \s matches more characters than just [ \r\t\n] (but that doesn't make this regex any less valid). –  Alan Moore Jan 16 '12 at 3:04
    
Depends - OP said they wanted to preserve \n and \n\n but remove any other combinations, so I just replaced with ''. –  mathematical.coffee Jan 16 '12 at 3:17
    
If the original string is foo\n\n\nbar, you'll change it to foobar. That doesn't look right to me. –  Alan Moore Jan 16 '12 at 3:55
    
I agree, I'll update my answer to replace with \n and explain why that might be desirable. Cheers. –  mathematical.coffee Jan 16 '12 at 4:07
$fixed = preg_replace('/\n\s+/', '\n', $bad);

Find any linebreak followed by 1 or more whitespace characters (spaces, tabs, etc..) and replace it with a single linebreak.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't account for valid entries of \n\n nor does it account for "\n\n \n \n \n\n" etc (all blank space). If possible, can all blank space be condensed into a maximum output of double enter \n\n ? –  Justin Jan 16 '12 at 2:45
    
I'd use str_replace() instead of preg_replace() since there's no need for the use of regex. –  SOliver Jan 16 '12 at 2:48
    
@Soliver: that presumes these evil people are consistently evil and don't do multiple spaces in varying quantities. str_replace is good for unvarying fixed single patterns. –  Marc B Jan 16 '12 at 2:52
    
@Jusin: \s includes \n. –  Marc B Jan 16 '12 at 2:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.