Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a callback function that loads a page of data at a time. The function gets called/triggered when the back and next links are clicked. I run into issues with the animation and the load completing in time when the end user does fast, subsequent clicks of next link and repetitively calls the load function. I realize that this is an async call, but is there a way to queue or pause the loads/animations so that one load is not running before the other one is finished?

  function NextPageNav_Click() {
      var CurPage = parseInt($('#CurPage').attr('value').toString()) + 1;
      $('#CurPage').attr('value', CurPage);
      loadPage(CurPage, 'Next');
  }


  function loadPage(CurPage, State) {
      $.ajax({
          type: "POST",
          url: "defaulttmp3.aspx/GetLatestProfiles",
          cache: true,
          async: false,
          data: "{'PageIndex': " + CurPage + "}",
          contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
          dataType: "json",
          success: function (msg) {


              switch (State) {

                  case 'Previous':
                      $('<div id="nextitems"></div>').insertBefore('#curitems');
                      $('#nextitems').empty();
                      $('#nextitems').setTemplateURL('page/public/templates/profiletemplate.htm');
                      $('#nextitems').processTemplate(msg);
                      $('#items').attr('style', 'left:-920px');
                      $('#items').animate({
                          "left": "+=920px"
                      }, 500, function () {

                          $('#curitems').remove();
                          $('#nextitems').attr('id', 'curitems');
                      }

                      );

                      break;

                  case 'Next':

                      $('<div id="nextitems"></div>').insertAfter('#curitems');
                      $('#nextitems').empty();
                      $('#nextitems').setTemplateURL('page/public/templates/profiletemplate.htm');
                      $('#nextitems').processTemplate(msg);
                      $('#items').animate({
                          "left": "-=920px"
                      }, 500, function () {
                         $('#curitems').remove();
                         $('#nextitems').attr('id', 'curitems');
                         $('#items').attr('style', 'left:0');
                      }

                      );
                   break;  
                  default:
                      $('#curitems').empty();
                      $('#curitems').setTemplateURL('page/public/templates/profiletemplate.htm');
                      $('#curitems').processTemplate(msg);
                      break;

              }


              var RowsReturned = parseInt(msg.d.RowsReturned.toString());
              var PageSize = parseInt(msg.d.PageSize.toString());
              initPrevNextLinks(RowsReturned, PageSize, CurPage);



          },
          error: function (request, status, error) {
              alert(request.statusText);
          }

      });
  }
share|improve this question

rather, try throttling the click

var throttleAsync(callback, time) {
     var timeoutId = null;
     return function() {
           clearTimeout(timeoutId);
           timoeoutId = setTimeout(callback, time || 1);
     };
}

EDIT

the previous resets it per call, however to use the first click & ignore subsequent clicks

var throttleAsync(callback, time) {
     var timeoutId = null;
     return function() {
           if(timeoutId == null) {
                timoeoutId = setTimeout(function() { timeoutId = null; callback; }, time || 1);
           }
     };
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to stop the previous animation before starting the next one, you can do so using the .stop() jQuery function like this:

$('#items').stop(true, true).animate(...);

The options for .stop() control what happens to the stopped animation, but if you just want it to jump to the end and be done, you probably want .stop(true, true).

In your particular case, you probably also have to worry about queued up ajax calls that may not have completed yet before the next click comes through. In that case, you can either keep a flag for whether an ajax call is in flight and ignore any clicks that come through then or you can try to abort the currently in-flight ajax call using .abort() as shown here.

I'd probably recommend just ignoring any button presses while an ajax call is already in progress since going faster that the results come in is probably not all that useful.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.