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anisha@linux-dopx:~/> gdb a.out
(gdb) watch dummyA::x
Cannot reference non-static field "x"
(gdb) 

x is a private member of a class named dummyA.
How to set a watch point on the private member of the class?

Language: C++
Platform: Linux

EDIT 1:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class dummyA
{
    int x;

    public:
        dummyA ()
        {
            x = 0;
        }

        void test ()
        {
            x++;
        }
};

int main ()
{
    dummyA obj;
    obj.test ();
    obj.test ();
    obj.test ();
}

Output:

(gdb) watch obj.x
No symbol "obj" in current context.

(gdb) watch obj::x
No symbol "obj" in current context.

Now, what does that error mean?

share|improve this question
1  
The error means you have to step past the first line in which obj is instantiated. The line that reads dummyA obj;. –  Omnifarious Jan 16 '12 at 7:26
    
@Omnifarious You are right!! Thanks, but what sense does it make? Can I not set the watchpoints at the beginning of the session? Think about putting the reply in your answer (if you can). –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 16 '12 at 7:29
1  
You cannot set watch points on objects that don't exist yet. You can set watchpoints on global variables at the beginning of the session (or at the very least, after a breakpoint on main is hit), but nothing else. –  Omnifarious Jan 16 '12 at 7:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Suppose you have this:

class A {
 private:
   int x;
}

int main()
{
    A foo;
    A bar;
    return 0;
}

Now you have two instances of A named foo and bar. If you tell the debugger to watch A::x how does it know which instance you mean?

When you watch an instance variable (of which there is one for each instance) instead of a static variable (of which there is only one for every class) you need to specify which instance's variable you want to watch. You are specifying which class' variable you want to watch. And while that would be OK with a static variable (there is only one static variable per class) it's not OK with an instance variable.

In this case, in main, after stepping past the two lines A foo; and A bar; you could do:

watch foo.x

or

watch bar.x

and it would work just fine. You have to step past those lines because not even the names (much less the objects they refer to) exist until after them.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, see the edit please. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 16 '12 at 7:23
1  
@AnishaKaul: I commented on the question and edited this post. –  Omnifarious Jan 16 '12 at 7:29
    
Thanks, but You have to step past those lines because not even the names (much less the objects they refer to) exist until after them. do we not set the breakpoints on the functions on the very start? We do? How does that work then? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 16 '12 at 7:31
    
Well, think about it... the code for those functions exists at the very start. It's created by the compiler when you compile the program. So its position is known. One way the debugger can set a breakpoint there is by modifying the code at the beginning of the function to cause a signal that it traps. But how can it do anything for a variable that doesn't exist yet? It hasn't been assigned a memory location or anything. There is nothing the debugger can do. –  Omnifarious Jan 16 '12 at 7:34

GDB appears to think that this is a non-static member, hence you would need an instantiated object to get at it.

Are you sure you've marked this class member as static? It needs to be static (class-specific rather than object-specific) if you wish to access it via the class.

With the following program:

#include <iostream>
class xyzzy { public: int x; };
//int xyzzy::x = 7;
int main (void) {
    xyzzy plugh;
    plugh.x = 42;
    std::cout << plugh.x << '\n';
    return 0;
}

my session is similar to yours:

(gdb) b main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x80485cd: file qq.cpp, line 12.
(gdb) run
Starting program: /home/pax/qq 
Breakpoint 1, main () at qq.cpp:12
12      plugh.x = 42;
(gdb) watch xyzzy::x
Cannot reference non-static field "x"
(gdb) 

But, when I make x static and uncomment the initialiser, I get the more successful:

(gdb) b main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x80485cd: file qq.cpp, line 6.
(gdb) run
Starting program: /home/pax/qq 
Breakpoint 1, main () at qq.cpp:6
6       plugh.x = 42;
(gdb) watch xyzzy::x
Hardware watchpoint 2: xyzzy::x

If you want to watch a member of an object (rather than class), you have to wait until it's substantiated, such as with:

#include <iostream>
class xyzzy { public: int x; };
int main (void) {
    xyzzy plugh;
    plugh.x = 42;
    std::cout << plugh.x << '\n';
    return 0;
}

and the transcript:

(gdb) b main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x80485cd: file qq.cpp, line 5.
(gdb) run
Starting program: /home/pax/qq 

Breakpoint 1, main () at qq.cpp:5
5       plugh.x = 42;
(gdb) watch plugh.x
Hardware watchpoint 2: plugh.x
(gdb) 
share|improve this answer
    
No, I haven't marked anything static. x is just a plain private int variable of class dummyA getting initialized in the constructor. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 16 '12 at 7:03
1  
@AnishaKaul: Presumably you can instantiate several instances of class A. And each of these instances will contain its own x. How does the debugger know which instance you mean? –  Omnifarious Jan 16 '12 at 7:08
    
@Anisha, if it's non-static, you have to access it via an object, not the class. Non-static members belong to individual objects. –  paxdiablo Jan 16 '12 at 7:15
    
How does the debugger know which instance you mean? Thanks pax, I realize this now. But I tried it through the object, see the edit, it still doesnt work! What's the point that I am missing? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 16 '12 at 7:21
1  
@Anisha, most functions (barring those that will be dynamically loaded as DLLs) exist at startup. Not all variables exist at startup. GDB even allows for this deferment with a message like (gdb) b no_such_fn Function "no_such_fn" not defined. Make breakpoint pending on future shared library load? (y or [n])? –  paxdiablo Jan 16 '12 at 7:41

As x is a private member of your class, it's information (and thus its memory location) depends on the object (the this pointer) with which you access it.

Thus you need to set your watch somewhere you have a scope-accessible reference to the concerned object (including this pointer if you break in a member method).

One other solution may be to use accessors & mutators, and exclusively access your variable through those accessors. Then you'll be able to put a standard breakpoint in the accessors & mutators, which allows you to break on any access to private ivar x, without object specific information.

share|improve this answer
    
Thus you need to set your watch somewhere you have a scope-accessible reference to the concerned object (including this pointer if you break in a member method). Any example for this? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jan 16 '12 at 7:05
    
"including this pointer if you break in a member method" –  Geoffroy Jan 16 '12 at 7:42

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