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How can I map an array of Doubles in JPA. I have the following code which fails because hibernate cannot initialise the array.

@Entity
public class YearlyTarget extends GenericModel {

    @Id
    public Integer  year;

    @ElementCollection
    public Double[] values;

    public YearlyTarget(int year) {
        this.year = year;
        this.values = new Double[12];
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

JPA does not mandate being able to persist arrays to a separate table; obviously JDO does but then you have chosen not to use that. Consequently you need to either store them as @Lob, or change your java type to a List.

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Thanks, I understand now. –  emt14 Jan 16 '12 at 8:49
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Use an Object type, such as ArrayList. Example

@ElementCollection
public ArrayList<Double> values;

public YearlyTarget(int year) {
    this.year = year;
    this.values = new ArrayList<Double>(12);
}
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Do you mean that arrays cannot be mapped directly with jpa and a collection needs to be used instead? –  emt14 Jan 16 '12 at 7:14
    
@emt14 Plain arrays would be a real pain in the ass to work with, if you have a collection of values that changes frequently. This question tackles the same issue, with the same outcome: use a collection. –  tmbrggmn Jan 16 '12 at 7:25
    
Arrays are also the best storage option for a fixed length data type. No overhead compared to collections. Using the collection seems to be a workaround the fact that jpa does not persists arrays. –  emt14 Jan 16 '12 at 7:30
1  
@emt14 I suspect JPA implementations can no proxy arrays as easily as lists or other collections. –  ewernli Jan 16 '12 at 8:51
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