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Create Trigger:

SELECT @oldVersionId = (SELECT DISTINCT VERSION_ID FROM Deleted)
    SELECT @newVersionId = (SELECT DISTINCT VERSION_ID FROM Inserted)
    SELECT @appId = (SELECT DISTINCT APP_ID FROM Deleted)

UPDATE [TableName]
SET [VERSION_ID] = @newVersionId
WHERE (([VERSION_ID] = @oldVersionId) AND ([APP_ID] = @appId) )

Can this Trigger be replace with a Foreign Key to update the VERSION_ID ?

What I think could be a problem is the AND condition, how to express that in a FK with On del/update Cascade?

share|improve this question
    
I want to get rid of that trigger and replace it with a FK constraint. When PK ID changes cascade that change on another FK ID table. – Elisabeth Jan 16 '12 at 9:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I cannot really tell you what you're looking for - you're too unclear in your question.

But basically, if two tables are linked via a foreign key constraint, of course you can add a clause to that to make sure the child table gets updated when the parents table's PK changes:

ALTER TABLE dbo.ChildTable
ADD CONSTRAINT FK_ChildTable_ParentTable
FOREIGN KEY(ChildTableColumn) REFERENCES dbo.ParentTable(PKColumn)
   ON UPDATE CASCADE

The ON UPDATE CASCADE does exactly that - if the referenced column (the PKColumn in ParentTable) changes, then the FK constraint will "cascade" that update down into the child table and update it's ChildTableColumn to match the new PKColumn

Read all about cascading referential integrity constraints and what options you have on MSDN Books Online

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FOREIGN KEY CONSTRAINTS don't update anything. They check the values being written to a record and cause the write to fail if they cause a constraint to fail.

Also, as @marc_s points out in his comment, triggers in MS SQL Server are set based. The INSERTED and DELETED tables can hold multiple records at once. Your code only works for one record.

You could try something along these lines...

UPDATE
  table
SET
  VERSION_ID = inserted.VERSION_ID
FROM
  table
INNER JOIN
  deleted
    ON  table.VERSION_ID = deleted.VERSION_ID
    AND table.APP_ID     = deleted.APP_ID
INNER JOIN
  inserted
    ON deleted.PRIMARY_KEY = inserted.PRIMARY_KEY


EDIT

I just read your comment, and I think I understand. You want a foreign key constraint with ON UPDATE CASCADE.

You use this format to create that with DDL.

ALTER TABLE DBO.<child table>
ADD CONSTRAINT <foreign key name> FOREIGN KEY <child column>
REFERENCES DBO.<parent table>(<parent column>)
{ON [DELETE|UPDATE] CASCADE}

Or you could just SQL Server Management Studio to set it up. Just make sure the ON UPDATE CASCADE is present.

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