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i have a situation in C++ where i need to:

1) define a "default" value for static const variables in a namespace declared/defined in an object module

2) allow several "main" programs to "overwrite" these values using "custom" values

each "main" program has its own build folder and its own copy of the object module, so "main" programs are completely independent of each other:

e.g.

/mainProgramA/build/mainProgramA.o
/mainProgramA/build/Module.o
/mainProgramB/build/mainProgramB.o
/mainProgramB/build/Module.o

also, at any one time, either the default values or custom values will be defined/declared, but not both. if the compiler "finds" the custom values, they will be used, if not, the defaults will be used.

i can't use weak symbols without namespaces because i need the namespaces to avoid naming clashes. i can't use weak symbols with namespaces because i get "error: weak declaration of ... must be public". i could use a class perhaps, but all the values are known at compile time and not variable. What is the simplest and most elegant way to do this?

to clarify, i'm trying to do something like this:

DefaultValues.h:

namespace ConfigParams {
    static const int param1 = 1;
    static const int param2 = 2;
}

CustomValues.h:

namespace ConfigParams {
    static const int param1 = 100;
    static const int param2 = 200;
}

Module.h:

#include "DefaultValues.h"
class Module {
public:
    static void printParam1();
}   

Module.cpp:

#include "Module.h"

void Module::printParam1() 
{
    printf("%d\n", param1);
}

mainUsingDefaultValues.cpp (which will link in a copy of module.o where param1 == 1):

#include "Module.h"

...
Module::printParam1(); // Should print "1"

mainUsingCustomValues.cpp (which will link in a copy of module.o where param1 == 100):

#include "CustomValues.h"
#include "Module.h"

...
Module::printParam1(); // Should print "100"
share|improve this question
    
Include either DefaultValues.h or CustomValues.h, but not both. You can do it differently, but I'd say use #define in CustomValues.h and then check if it's defined in Module.h and include DefaultValues.h based on that. –  Petr Budnik Jan 16 '12 at 9:33
    
@AzzA I guess that's no way of doing that. Constants should be compiled and linked with absolute address therefor when you define class two times with different constants it should result in one in real application. –  Vyktor Jan 16 '12 at 9:37
    
@Vyktor I think the question was how to exclude default values when custom values are specified. You can do it with preprocessor... Or maybe I misunderstood. I understand it as you either select one or another and OP author needs way to select it. You cannot use both, of course, you can include one or another. –  Petr Budnik Jan 16 '12 at 9:41
    
Shouldn't it be ConfigParams::param1 (or using namespace ConfigParams;). Now to answer your question, If you keep different param1 in different namespace and then leverage using namespace ...; accordingly, it would elegantly solve your problem. Presently feeling lazy to transform this comment into an answer. –  iammilind Jan 16 '12 at 9:45
1  
@AzzA: still, if Module.cpp contains a definition of param1 with a different value from the value in main.cpp, then the function in Module will print the value that was defined for Module.cpp, not the value that was defined for main.cpp. Doesn't matter whether Module.cpp is in a separate .lib or not, if you want a "compile-time constant" then you need to define it with the same value in every TU. –  Steve Jessop Jan 16 '12 at 10:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
// File: CustomValues.h
#define MY_CUSTOM_VALUES
namespace ConfigParams 
{
 static const int param1 = 100;
 static const int param2 = 200;
}


// File: DefaultValues.h
#ifndef MY_CUSTOM_VALUES
namespace ConfigParams 
{
 static const int param1 = 1;
 static const int param2 = 2;
}
#endif

You can make it more flexible if you need it.

EDIT: Just in case I misunderstood the question. This way user of your library will be defaulted to DefaultValues.h, unless they include CustomValues.h before Module.h. You can have either one or another, but not both.

#include "Module.h"
#include "CustomValues.h"

will not compile, since you'll be redefining your constants.

And just to make sure, you'll need to include CustomValues.h in Module.cpp as well. So, probably, it's better to make a #ifdef switch inside Module.h and make user #define MY_CUSTOM_VALUES somewhere before any Module.h includes:

// File: Module.h
#include "My_Constants.h" // #define MY_CUSTOM_VALUES can go here
#ifdef MY_CUSTOM_VALUES
#include "CustomValues.h"
#elif
#include "DefaultValues.h"
#endif

class Module
{
 public:
  static void printParam1();
}   
// End of Module.h

// File: Module.cpp
#include "Module.h"

void Module::printParam1() 
{
 printf("%d\n", ConfigParams::param1);
}
// End of Module.cpp
share|improve this answer
    
I wander... Static tells compiler&linker that this variable should be initialized in the beginning of program and should be there whole time. Doesn't it? And when linker sees two variables with the same name, both static... Doesn't it (shouldn't it?) use the same "absolute address in memory"? –  Vyktor Jan 16 '12 at 9:49
    
@Vyktor Once again, #define is for preprocessor to bypass default definition, if custom is supplied. The default ones will be eliminated by preprocessor and won't make it to compilation. –  Petr Budnik Jan 16 '12 at 9:53
    
I understand that, but I though that static const has global scope (after linking) and therefore linker tries to put them all into the same "memory spot". Or are they all in local scope unless extern is used? –  Vyktor Jan 16 '12 at 9:59
2  
@Vyktor static, const and static const have internal linkage. –  Petr Budnik Jan 16 '12 at 10:14
    
i think this looks like a good method! –  user1151522 Jan 16 '12 at 12:45

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