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Why does it always return 49999 no matter what strToSearch variable holds? Even with the clank search variable it returns the same. Have I missed something:

    String[] arr = new String[100000];
    String strToSearch = "12";
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        arr[i] = i+","+i;
    }
    Arrays.sort(arr, new Comparator<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            if(o1 != null && o2 != null && !o1.isEmpty() && !o2.isEmpty() && o1.indexOf(",") != -1 && o2.indexOf(",") != -1) {
                String[] o1Arr = o1.split(",");
                String[] o2Arr = o2.split(",");
                Integer one = Integer.parseInt(o1Arr[0]);
                Integer two = Integer.parseInt(o2Arr[0]);
                return one.compareTo(two);
            }
            return 0;
        }
    });
    System.out.println(Arrays.binarySearch(arr, strToSearch, new Comparator<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            if(o1 != null && o2 != null && !o1.isEmpty() && !o2.isEmpty() && o1.indexOf(",") != -1 && o2.indexOf(",") != -1) {
                String[] o1Arr = o1.split(",");
                String[] o2Arr = o2.split(",");
                return o1Arr[0].compareTo(o2Arr[0]);
            }
            return 0;
        }
    }));

My array contains comma separated values and I want to search based on string before comma in array elements. Is there any other simple solution available? I have also made a custom method which loops over array and finds the string but I'm looking for some alternatives.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using two different comparators? The second one does String comparison, so it will return a different ordering than the first. Also, the comparators should not return 0 on erroneous cases (i.e. when the value is null), that means that the items are equal (I guess that is related to having a wrong output). –  Viruzzo Jan 16 '12 at 9:57
    
Is it correct that you do integer comparision when sorting, but String comparison when searching? Look at your second comparator –  king_nak Jan 16 '12 at 9:57
    
Why do you think these alternatives would be faster than your custom method? Why don't you use the same comparator to sort and search? –  JB Nizet Jan 16 '12 at 9:58
    
@king_nak: Yes I have 2 diff comparator. –  Harry Joy Jan 16 '12 at 9:59
    
@JBNizet: Even if I use same comparator it returns 49999. –  Harry Joy Jan 16 '12 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The JavaDoc on Arrays.binarySearch(...) states that the array must already be sorted and thus the comparator actually compares the array value and the search string and not is not used for sorting the array again.

This means you get something like compare(arr[x], "12") and your if condition states that both strings must contain a comma, otherwise they are equal. And "12" doesn't contain any commas, thus making "12" equal to every element in the array (always returns 0).

Edit:

Looking at the source code seems to support my assumption. There's this line, for example:

 //c is the Comparator
 //midVal is an element of your array 
 //key is the key parameter you passed to binarySearch(...)
 c.compare(midVal, key); 

The reason for 49999 being returned is that the first mid value is at index mid = (low + high) >> 1 which is (0 + 99999) >> 1 == 49999 and since the comparator returns 0 the values are considered equal. And boom, the value is "found".

share|improve this answer
    
Then how can search for 12? –  Harry Joy Jan 16 '12 at 10:01
    
@mark Account for the fact that o2 doesn't contain commas and adjust your if statement. You might also return a non-zero value for empty/null strings since those normally are not equal to the array elements (unless those are empty/null too). –  Thomas Jan 16 '12 at 10:05
    
Thnx it works now. –  Harry Joy Jan 16 '12 at 10:09

In your 2nd if-Statement: since your strToSearch = "12" and do not contain a ",", the

o2.indexOf(",") != -1

will always return false.

Delete the hole if-Statement or at least the last part and it works.

share|improve this answer

Problem is in your binarysearch's comparator method. It should be re-written like this:

System.out.println(Arrays.binarySearch(arr, strToSearch, new Comparator<String>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
        if(o1 != null && o2 != null && !o1.isEmpty() && !o2.isEmpty() && o1.indexOf(",") != -1) {
            String[] o1Arr = o1.split(",");
            int i1 = Integer.parseInt(o2);
            int i2 = Integer.parseInt(o1Arr[0]);
            return i2-i1;
        }
        return 0;
    }
}));
share|improve this answer

You assume that String strToSearch is of type "12,12". To make this code work just change strToSearch

For example:

Arrays.binarySearch(arr, "12,12", new Comparator<String>)
share|improve this answer

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