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I'm using Visual Studio 2010 and I'm in the process of adding 5 general languages (not dialects) to my company's website, following the MSDN tutorial on implicit and explicit localization

Can I put my entire aboutus.aspx page code into the LocalizedString.resx and LocalizedString.fr.resx and so on? Or do I have to make a new string for each block of text? I put the entire aboutus.aspx main content code into the .resx file, and the page layout worked fine. But the asp:hyperlinks didn't work.

Am I going about this the wrong way? Do I just have to STOP the string at a hyperlink, and then start a new one? Is it normal to have 30 strings on an .resx page?

The bottom line:

Can I clump this all in a string in a single resource file? Or would I just put aboutus1 until the first hyperlink, then aboutus2 after the first hyperlink until the 2nd. The coding is:

  We design, 
        engineer, and produce special machine vision error-proofing <asp:HyperLink ID="HyperLink3" runat="server" 
    NavigateUrl="~/services/" Target="_self">products and services</asp:HyperLink> 
        that create lean factories by improving the quality of manufactured 
products, and by significantly reducing manufacturing costs through advanced 
automation.

I know I'd have to put in the aboutus.aspx page wherever I replaced the code:

      <asp:Label ID="Label2" runat="server" 
    Text="<%$ Resources:LocalizedText, aboutus1 %>"></asp:Label>

But what about the hyperlinks? Am I doing this the right way? I want to be able to get these pages done and overwith! Thank you for your time in reading this, and any suggestions or guidance would be greatly appreciated!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's no reason to use <asp:HyperLink/> where you are. It's a server-side tag, which is why it's not working when you try to have it output from the resources. Instead, you should just use a plain HTML <a> tag like so:

  We design, engineer, and produce special machine vision error-proofing <a  
    href="/services/" Target="_self">products and services</a> 
        that create lean factories by improving the quality of manufactured products, and by significantly reducing manufacturing costs through advanced automation.

Note that the URL is different, slightly: it does not have the ~ at the beginning, which is only valid in the server-side tag, anyway.

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Hey, thank you Andrew! You know, when building this website, I always thought it was more "asp.net 4.0 proper", per se, to use asp:hyperlinks instead of plain html hyperlinks. That's why I made all my hyperlinks that way. I truly appreciate you taking the time to read my post and respond! I'll get to work right now! Thank you very much! –  Jason Weber Jan 16 '12 at 16:41
1  
Again, thank you very much for explaining it so clearly, Andrew. I'm not so inept that I don't understand html and some asp.net coding, but the way you explained it, anybody could understand. The page works perfectly in the 3 languages I've added so far. And I can take what you said and apply it to my entire website -- there's really no benefit of using the asp:hyperlink for what I'm doing. I thought it was "asp.net 4.0 proper" to use those types of hyperlinks, but now I realize that's not necessarily the case. Appreciate you taking the time to respond! –  Jason Weber Jan 16 '12 at 16:55
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