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Using Javascript I have been able to select an image element (an HTMLImageElement object, say img1) in my html document. I can also get its style using img1.style. However, the following returns a blank alert:

alert(img1.style.width);

whereas this used in the same position works fine:

alert(img1.width);

so I don't think it's a problem with the image not having loaded yet.

I can set the width using either of the two options, though, and I like using the first, of course. But why can't I get the width using the first?

It's not so much the task I want to accomplish that's the issue here (I can do that in the second way); I want to learn what's wrong with the first way.

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1  
Depending on the size of the project, it might be usefull to use jQuery's width() function, so you don't have to worry about all this! – Connell Watkins Jan 16 '12 at 10:16
    
You are probably right. But it's not a huge project yet, and I wanted to stick to pure javascript and get some more practise coding the hard way before considering jQuery. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 10:21
    
Good call! Yeah I agree, sometimes jQuery can be a little too much for a small project. But if there's a similar problem in a larger project, jQuery would solve this (and likely a bunch of other problems you're likely to be having) – Connell Watkins Jan 16 '12 at 10:42
up vote 6 down vote accepted

img1.style.width returns the value of the css-attribute width. If you don't have a css rule that applies a width to that image, the property is an empty string.

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This is probably it. However, the thought had crossed my mind. I had a specification for the height in the css, and I think I got a blank alert for that too. I'll check again and get back. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 10:13
2  
@Abhranil: more specifically, .style.width represents the inline style attribute for an element. If you set width in a separate stylesheet, it will still be missing for img1.style.width. – Andy E Jan 16 '12 at 10:20
    
Okay, that's greatly illuminating! Also very inconvenient :-( In that case, how would one go about fetching the style? – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 10:26
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@AbhranilDas, this might be 2 years late... I ran into the same problem, and I found your comment here and another response. That other response worked for my issue, which was finding the width of a div. – ayjay Feb 5 '14 at 16:20

These are references to two different ways of setting an <img> width:

  • You can set in in the HTML attributes, through <img width="100px"> for example.
  • You can set it for a style or a class that your <img> will belong to, through CSS.

The first one is accessed through img.width. The second one through img.style.width.

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This is essentially what Simon said in his answer. – Shadow Wizard Jan 16 '12 at 10:19
    
Indeed. I should spend less time formatting T.T' – Silver Quettier Jan 16 '12 at 10:21
    
True, but my problem here is why one of these ways failed. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 10:23
    
Where are you setting the img width ? If it's through the width="" html attribute, there won't be any width defined in the style linked to your img tag, hence the blank alert. – Silver Quettier Jan 16 '12 at 10:25
    
The width is specified in a separate CSS file, so it's part of style. – Abhranil Das Jan 16 '12 at 10:29

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