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I'm a C and MATLAB user. When I started learning Python (a week ago) I noticed that I don't use full potential of MATLAB, in particular array operations. I use for loops often, probably because I learnt programming in C.

In a previous tip, I learnt to use cumsum and other efficient array operations, for example:

alpha = [1e-4,1e-3,1e-4,1e-1,1e-2,1e-3,1e-6,1e-3];
zeta = alpha / (dz*dz)
nz = 101
l=[0.3,0.1,0.2,0.1,0.1,0.1,0.2];
wz = cumsum(l*(nz-1));
nl = lenght(l);   

Is it possible simplify the following code in Python (Numpy) or MATLAB?

      A = zeros(nz,nz);
      i=1;
      for j = 2:wz(i)-1
        A(j,j-1) = zeta(1,1);
        A(j,j) = -2*zeta(1,1);
        A(j,j+1) = zeta(1,1); % layer 1 nodes 
      end

      %cicle to n-layers
      for i=2:nl
          for j=wz(i-1):wz(i-1)
              A(j,j-1) = zeta(1,i-1);
              A(j,j) = -zeta(1,i-1)-zeta(1,i);
              A(j,j+1) = zeta(1,i); 
          end

          for j=wz(i-1)+1:wz(i)
              A(j,j-1) = zeta(1,i);
              A(j,j) = -2*zeta(1,i);
              A(j,j+1) = zeta(1,i);
          end

      end
end
share|improve this question
2  
It would be easier for us if you would explain in a sentence or two what the code is supposed to do, not just give us the plain code... –  Hans Jan 16 '12 at 12:21
    
@Hans This code belongs to an 1D Equation Heat Solver applied to a multilayer. alpha is an array with the diffusivities per layer, l is an array with the heights per layer, wz is an array which aggregates the cumulative sum of points (discrete points) and A is the "state matrix". After calculate state matrix, I'll implement the ode solver. –  marco Jan 16 '12 at 13:10
    
@marco: in case you didn't realise, MATLAB has various ODE solvers built in, while for Python, you can find ODE solvers in Scipy. –  James Jan 16 '12 at 15:03
    
I'll use a built in ODE solver. But matrix A is an Input of solver. THis code is corret (solves the problem) but it is not efficient. –  marco Jan 16 '12 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've modified the code below after having a chance to run it on my machine side by side yours. There are still a couple of questions (is A suppose to get larger in the final loop?, what is dz?). The problem you ran into before running this was that I forgot idx_matrix had to be logical.

dz=0.1;
alpha = [1e-4,1e-3,1e-4,1e-1,1e-2,1e-3,1e-6,1e-3];
zeta = alpha / (dz*dz);
nz = 101;
l=[0.3,0.1,0.2,0.1,0.1,0.1,0.2];
wz = cumsum(l*(nz-1));
nl = length(l);

A = zeros(nz);
i=1;

%replaces 1st loop
j_start = 2;
j_end = wz(i)-1;

idx_matrix = false(size(A));
idx_matrix(j_start:j_end,j_start:j_end) = eye(j_end-j_start+1);
A(idx_matrix) = -2*zeta(1,1);

idx_matrix(idx_matrix) = false;
idx_matrix(j_start:j_end,j_start-1:j_end-1) = eye(j_end-j_start+1);
A(idx_matrix) = zeta(1,1);

idx_matrix(idx_matrix) = false;
idx_matrix(j_start:j_end,j_start+1:j_end+1) = eye(j_end-j_start+1);
A(idx_matrix) = zeta(1,1);

%cicle to n-layers
for i=2:nl

    %replaces 3rd loop
    j_start = wz(i-1);
    A(j_start,j_start) = -zeta(1,i-1)-zeta(1,i);
    A(j_start,j_start-1) = zeta(1,i-1);
    A(j_start,j_start+1) = zeta(1,i);

    %replaces 4th loop
    j_start = wz(i-1)+1;
    j_end = min(wz(i),size(A,2)-1);
    idx_matrix = false(size(A));
    idx_matrix(j_start:j_end,j_start:j_end) = eye(j_end-j_start+1);
    A(idx_matrix) = -2*zeta(1,i);

    idx_matrix(idx_matrix) = false;
    idx_matrix(j_start:j_end,j_start-1:j_end-1) = eye(j_end-j_start+1);
    A(idx_matrix) = zeta(1,i);

    idx_matrix(idx_matrix) = false;
    idx_matrix(j_start:j_end,j_start+1:j_end+1) = eye(j_end-j_start+1);
    A(idx_matrix) = zeta(1,i);

end
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for answering. Your code has an error ??? Subscript indices must either be real positive integers or logicals. A(idx_matrix) = -2*zeta(1,1); It's so early in the code, that I can't figure what you want to do. Yes, third cycle, can be an assignment, I didn't find a better way to this instruction. (This represents the boundary between layers, if you read my code description to @Hans) –  marco Jan 18 '12 at 11:04
    
AHh, and "you're A matrix" is an array (A=zeros(nz)) is an error or not? –  marco Jan 18 '12 at 11:18
    
A = zeros(nz) is the same as A = zeros(nz,nz) –  Miebster Jan 18 '12 at 15:58
    
Did you intend for A to get larger as this code continues to run? The final for loop adds a column to A because wz(i) == size(A,2) and A(j,j+1) indexes out of bounds, so another column is added. Also, you never defined dz. –  Miebster Jan 18 '12 at 16:06
    
Make sure you check the updated code above. –  Miebster Jan 18 '12 at 16:16

To simplify your loops, you can use the function spdiags.

http://www.mathworks.fr/help/techdoc/ref/spdiags.html

For instance your first loop can be written as:

A=full(spdiags(repmat([zeta(1,1),-2*zeta(1,1),zeta(1,1)],wz(i),1),[-1 0 1],wz(i),wz(i)))
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the reference, but this don't resolve my problem =) I'm trying to find a way to simplify the problem, in other words transform the iteration problem in vector problem –  marco Jan 16 '12 at 16:05
    
I edited the answer to show you how to use spdiags in your case, –  Oli Jan 16 '12 at 16:15
    
I didn't get it, and when I paste the code in Matlab, returns ??? Index exceeds matrix dimensions. Error in ==> spdiags at 114 a((len(k)+1):len(k+1),:) = [i i+d(k) B(i+(m>=n)*d(k),k)]; –  marco Jan 17 '12 at 10:22
    
oups, sorry, I made a mistake. Does it work now? –  Oli Jan 17 '12 at 10:42
    
works, but the results are different. "My matrix" has a diagonal (with 3 values) with 100,-200,100. "yours" has always 100. You're matrix has 30,30 size, which is normal, because it is only the first part of cycle. –  marco Jan 17 '12 at 11:20

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