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I use JSON.stringify method to pass an array to server.

I have an array that has 4 elements:

arr[10] = 1;
arr[20] = 1;
arr[30] = 1;
arr[40] = 1;

Then i do this:

arr = JSON.stringify(arr);

Then send it to the server:

                jQuery.ajax({
                    type: "post",
                    url: baseurl+"profile/mprofile/action/ratings/add_ratings",
                    data:{"checkbox":checkbox,"review":review,"speciality":speciality,"arr":arr},
                    success: function(data, status) {  

                        jQuery('#header-error').html(data);
                    } 
                }); 

I am getting the array in PHP with:

    $arr = $this->ci->input->post('arr');
    $arr = json_decode($arr);
    print_r($arr) ; die ;

the result is

Array
(
    [0] => 
    [1] => 
    [2] => 
    [3] => 
    [4] => 
    [5] => 
    [6] => 
    [7] => 
    [8] => 
    [9] => 
    [10] => 1
    [11] => 
    [12] => 
    [13] => 
    [14] => 
    [15] => 
    [16] => 
    [17] => 
    [18] => 
    [19] => 
    [20] => 1
    [21] => 
    [22] => 
    [23] => 
    [24] => 
    [25] => 
    [26] => 
    [27] => 
    [28] => 
    [29] => 
    [30] => 1
    [31] => 
    [32] => 
    [33] => 
    [34] => 
    [35] => 
    [36] => 
    [37] => 
    [38] => 
    [39] => 
    [40] => 1
)

Why is this happening?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's how javascript arrays work. When you set value to an index that is out of range, array is expanded, value is successfully set and all 'missing' values are set to undefined.

You are spoiled by PHP behaviour that blends the difference between arrays and dictionaries (or "associative arrays", in PHP talk).

To avoid this behaviour, just create a dictionary in javascript instead of array.

var arr = {};
arr[10] = 1;
arr[20] = 2;

Also, on PHP side you should pass true as a second parameter to json_decode.

json_decode($arr, true)

This will make it return array instead of stdclass.

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1  
+1, though you might want to add that on the php side the second parameter for json_decode is needed to be set to true, or you'll end up with stdclass objects instead of arrays. –  Yoshi Jan 16 '12 at 12:09
    
@Yoshi: thanks, added. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 16 '12 at 12:10
    
thank you very very much all of you .................. :D :D –  Kanishka Panamaldeniya Jan 16 '12 at 15:03
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Arrays in JavaScript work a bit differently than in PHP. You don't actually have an array with 4 elements, you have one with 41 elements right from the start. For example, when you say arr[ 10 ] = 1, every array element between 0 and 9 are automatically assigned undefined.

I suggest you switch the logic around: instead of using array keys to track values, use array values instead:

arr = [ 10, 20, 30, 40 ];

Or, if you need other than binary values, use objects:

arr = [
    { score: 10, value: 1 },
    { score: 20, value: 5 }
];
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How do you initialize arr? You probably want to use an object instead of an Array. For example:

var arr = {};
arr[10] = 1;
arr[20] = 1;
arr[30] = 1;
arr[30] = 1;
var jsonified = JSON.stringify(arr);
console.log(jsonified);
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