Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need regular expressions to match the below cases.

  1. 3 or more consecutive sequential characters/numbers; e.g. 123, abc, 789, pqr, etc.
  2. 3 or more consecutive identical characters/numbers; e.g. 111, aaa, bbb, 222, etc.
share|improve this question
    
If you have your answer, please mark the question as solved by checking the answer. This will close the question and mark it as solved. See here for more information. –  Milad Naseri Jan 17 '12 at 20:09

7 Answers 7

I don't think you can use regex for the first case. The second case is easy though:

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("([a-z\\d])\\1\\1", Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);

Since \\1 represents part matched by group 1 this will match any sequence of three identical characters that are either within the range a-z or are digits (\d).

share|improve this answer

for the second question:

\\b([a-zA-Z0-9])\\1\\1+\\b

explanation:

\\b               : zero-length word boundary
  (               : start capture group 1
    [a-zA-Z0-9]   : a letter or a digit
  )               : end group
  \\1             : same character as group 1
  \\1+            : same character as group 1 one or more times
\\b               : zero-length word boundary
share|improve this answer
    
That first part isn't sequential though. –  AHungerArtist Jan 16 '12 at 15:14
    
@AHungerArtist:Yes, you're right, I misread the question. –  M42 Jan 16 '12 at 15:19
    
Why are you using the word boundaries? I don't see the question stating that we are looking for word-wrap searches –  Milad Naseri Jan 16 '12 at 18:04
    
@MiladNaseri to avoid matching aaaaaaab. –  mathematical.coffee Jan 16 '12 at 23:57

To my knowledge, the first case is indeed not possible. The regex engine doesn't know anything about the order of the natural numbers or the alphabet. But it's at least possible to differentiate between 3 or more numbers and 3 or more letters, for example:

[a-z]{3,}|[A-Z]{3,}|\d{3,}

This matches abcd, ABCDE or 123 but doesn't match ab2d, A5c4 or 12z, for example. According to this, the second case can be correctly given in a shorter version as:

  (\w)\1{2,}
share|improve this answer
    
\w includes also underscore _ –  M42 Jan 17 '12 at 12:38
    
Sure, but the author did not explicitly exclude punctuation. She only mentioned identical characters. This can be virtually everything. But anyway... –  pemistahl Jan 17 '12 at 13:38

3 or more consecutive sequential characters/numbers ex - 123, abc, 789, pqr etc.

Not possible with regular expressions.

3 or more consecutive identical characters/numbers ex - 111, aaa, bbb. 222 etc.

Use a pattern of (?i)(?:([a-z0-9])\\1{2,})*.

If you want to check the whole string, use Matcher.matches(). To find matches within a string, use Matcher.find().

Here's some sample code:

final String ps = "(?i)(?:([a-z0-9])\\1{2,})*";
final String psLong =
        "(?i)\t\t\t# Case insensitive flag\n"
                + "(?:\t\t\t\t# Begin non-capturing group\n"
                + " (\t\t\t\t# Begin capturing group\n"
                + "  [a-z0-9]\t\t# Match an alpha or digit character\n"
                + " )\t\t\t\t# End capturing group\n"
                + " \\1\t\t\t\t# Back-reference first capturing group\n"
                + " {2,}\t\t\t# Match previous atom 2 or more times\n"
                + ")\t\t\t\t# End non-capturing group\n"
                + "*\t\t\t\t# Match previous atom zero or more characters\n";
System.out.println("***** PATTERN *****\n" + ps + "\n" + psLong
        + "\n");
final Pattern p = Pattern.compile(ps);
for (final String s : new String[] {"aa", "11", "aaa", "111",
        "aaaaaaaaa", "111111111", "aaa111bbb222ccc333",
        "aaaaaa111111bbb222"})
{
    final Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
    if (m.matches()) {
        System.out.println("Success: " + s);
    } else {
        System.out.println("Fail: " + s);
    }
}

And the output is:

***** PATTERN *****
(?i)(?:([a-z0-9])\1{2,})*
(?i)            # Case insensitive flag
(?:             # Begin non-capturing group
 (              # Begin capturing group
  [a-z0-9]      # Match an alpha or digit character
 )              # End capturing group
 \1             # Back-reference first capturing group
 {2,}           # Match previous atom 2 or more times
)               # End non-capturing group
*               # Match previous atom zero or more characters


Fail: aa
Fail: 11
Success: aaa
Success: 111
Success: aaaaaaaaa
Success: 111111111
Success: aaa111bbb222ccc333
Success: aaaaaa111111bbb222
share|improve this answer
    
Your first pattern will match characters that aren't sequential (ie. vbgt) –  M42 Jan 17 '12 at 13:49
    
Oops, left that in. Corrected. –  Dan Cruz Jan 17 '12 at 13:58
    
how to check if the string has a group of 3 or more similar characters consecutive (.....CCC....), string shouldnt have 3 consecutive similar characters. eg. it should not accept 1. AAA 2. AAAAAAA 3. AAAAR –  srujan maddula Sep 19 at 9:05

If you have lower bound (3) and upper bound regexString can be generated as follows

public class RegexBuilder {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        int seqStart = 3;
        int seqEnd = 5;
        buildRegex(sb, seqStart, seqEnd);
        System.out.println(sb);
    }

    private static void buildRegex(StringBuilder sb, int seqStart, int seqEnd) {
        for (int i = seqStart; i <= seqEnd; i++) {
            buildRegexCharGroup(sb, i, '0', '9');
            buildRegexCharGroup(sb, i, 'A', 'Z');
            buildRegexCharGroup(sb, i, 'a', 'z');
            buildRegexRepeatedString(sb, i);
        }
    }

    private static void buildRegexCharGroup(StringBuilder sb, int seqLength,
            char start, char end) {
        for (char c = start; c <= end - seqLength + 1; c++) {
            char ch = c;
            if (sb.length() > 0) {
                sb.append('|');
            }
            for (int i = 0; i < seqLength; i++) {
                sb.append(ch++);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void buildRegexRepeatedString(StringBuilder sb, int seqLength) {
        sb.append('|');
        sb.append("([a-zA-Z\\d])");
        for (int i = 1; i < seqLength; i++) {
            sb.append("\\1");
        }
    }
}

Output

012|123|234|345|456|567|678|789|ABC|BCD|CDE|DEF|EFG|FGH|GHI|HIJ|IJK|JKL|KLM|LMN|MNO|NOP|OPQ|PQR|QRS|RST|STU|TUV|UVW|VWX|WXY|XYZ|abc|bcd|cde|def|efg|fgh|ghi|hij|ijk|jkl|klm|lmn|mno|nop|opq|pqr|qrs|rst|stu|tuv|uvw|vwx|wxy|xyz|([a-z\d])\1\1|0123|1234|2345|3456|4567|5678|6789|ABCD|BCDE|CDEF|DEFG|EFGH|FGHI|GHIJ|HIJK|IJKL|JKLM|KLMN|LMNO|MNOP|NOPQ|OPQR|PQRS|QRST|RSTU|STUV|TUVW|UVWX|VWXY|WXYZ|abcd|bcde|cdef|defg|efgh|fghi|ghij|hijk|ijkl|jklm|klmn|lmno|mnop|nopq|opqr|pqrs|qrst|rstu|stuv|tuvw|uvwx|vwxy|wxyz|([a-z\d])\1\1\1|01234|12345|23456|34567|45678|56789|ABCDE|BCDEF|CDEFG|DEFGH|EFGHI|FGHIJ|GHIJK|HIJKL|IJKLM|JKLMN|KLMNO|LMNOP|MNOPQ|NOPQR|OPQRS|PQRST|QRSTU|RSTUV|STUVW|TUVWX|UVWXY|VWXYZ|abcde|bcdef|cdefg|defgh|efghi|fghij|ghijk|hijkl|ijklm|jklmn|klmno|lmnop|mnopq|nopqr|opqrs|pqrst|qrstu|rstuv|stuvw|tuvwx|uvwxy|vwxyz|([a-z\d])\1\1\1\1
share|improve this answer

Thanks All for helping me.

For the first case - 3 or more consecutive sequential characters/numbers; e.g. 123, abc, 789, pqr, etc. I used below code logic. Pls share your comments on this.

public static boolean validateConsecutiveSeq(String epin) {
    char epinCharArray[] = epin.toCharArray();
    int asciiCode = 0;
    boolean isConSeq = false;
    int previousAsciiCode = 0;
    int numSeqcount = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < epinCharArray.length; i++) {
        asciiCode = epinCharArray[i];
        if ((previousAsciiCode + 1) == asciiCode) {
            numSeqcount++;
            if (numSeqcount >= 2) {
                isConSeq = true;
                break;
            }
        } else {
            numSeqcount = 0;
        }
        previousAsciiCode = asciiCode;
    }
    return isConSeq;
}
share|improve this answer

Sorry for resurrecting a dead thread, but a user in this thread: Regex for consecutive numbers noted that it IS indeed possible to match an arbitrary length of sequential characters in a string, provided you define the rules for which characters follow which.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.