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I'm trying to loop through an array of strings using the foreach control, and then use each value to insert information in the database. Could someone help me understand why within the using clause I can't use the foreach variable?

string[] ship_ids = ShipsInScope.Split('|');
foreach (string ship_id in ship_ids)
{
     using (SqlCommand InsertCommand = new SqlCommand("insert into PROJECT_SHIP (CR_Number, Ship_Id) VALUES (@CR_Number, @CCF_Number)", DBConn))
    {
         InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@CR_Number", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10).Value = CRNumber;
         InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@Ship_Id", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10).Value = Ship_Id;

         InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
         InsertCommand.Dispose();
    }
}
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4  
you have a casing problem there, in C# ship_id is not the same as Ship_id –  Marek Jan 16 '12 at 13:05
5  
You don't need a call to InsertCommand.Dispose() within your using clause as the using clause will automatically call Dispose on the SqlCommand when the code reaches the end of it. –  Samuel Slade Jan 16 '12 at 13:05
1  
Why are you calling InsertCommand.Dispose(); within the using block? –  Oded Jan 16 '12 at 13:06
1  
What they said. Also, I would never create a SqlCommand inside a loop like that. Create the SqlCommand once, then use it in the loop. Edit: oh well, it's not like you open and close the SqlConnection every time. –  Mr Lister Jan 16 '12 at 13:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

C# is case-sensitive. Your iteration variable is ship_id but you're trying to use Ship_Id in the loop.

Ideally, use C# naming conventions instead (and for other variables too):

// Declared outside the method.
private const string InsertSql = 
    "insert into PROJECT_SHIP (CR_Number, Ship_Id) " +
    "VALUES (@CR_Number, @CCF_Number)";

...

string[] shipIds = ShipsInScope.Split('|');
foreach (string shipId in shipIds)
{
    using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(InsertSql, connection))
    {
        command.Parameters.Add("@CR_Number", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10)
                          .Value = crNumber; // Unclear what this means
        command.Parameters.Add("@Ship_Id", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10)
                          .Value = shipId;
        command.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}

Notes:

  • Extracted constant SQL into a class-level constant. Not necessary, but might clarify things.
  • Renamed all variables to be camelCase without underscores
  • Wrapped lines for StackOverflow - you probably don't need as much wrapping in your code
  • Removed redundant explicit call to Dispose (as the using statement already calls Dispose)
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Unbelievable guys, that was an incredibly fast response time. Apologies it was so simple, I'm doing this after coming from VB! Thanks for the tip RE the using block. –  deed02392 Jan 16 '12 at 13:10

You are using Ship_id instead of ship_id. C# is case sensitive.

string[] ship_ids = ShipsInScope.Split('|');
foreach (string ship_id in ship_ids)
{
     using (SqlCommand InsertCommand = new SqlCommand("insert into PROJECT_SHIP (CR_Number, Ship_Id) VALUES (@CR_Number, @CCF_Number)", DBConn))
    {
         InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@CR_Number", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10).Value = CRNumber;
         InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@Ship_Id", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10).Value = ship_Id;

         InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}

Additionally, the using block will end up calling Dispose on InsertCommand - that's what a using statement does. No need to call Dispose yourself.

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if you are using the using statement you don't need to call the Dispose() method, it calls internally, and the names of the parameters are different, in the sql statement is @CCF_Number and in the parameters section is @Ship_Id.

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You capitalized your "ship_id" variable name:

             InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@Ship_Id", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10).Value = Ship_Id
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Based on the answers and comments so far, you could restructure your code as follows:

const string sql = @"
    INSERT INTO PROJECT_SHIP (CR_Number, Ship_Id) 
    VALUES (@CR_Number, @Ship_Id)";

using (SqlCommand InsertCommand = new SqlCommand(sql, DBConn))
{
    var parameters = InsertCommand.Parameters;
    var crNumberParameter = parameters.Add("@CR_Number", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10); 
    var shipIdParameter = parameters.Add("@Ship_Id", SqlDbType.NVarChar, 10);
    string[] ship_ids = ShipsInScope.Split('|');
    foreach (string ship_id in ship_ids)
    {
        crNumberParameter.Value = CRNumber;
        shipIdParameter.Value = ship_id;
        InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}
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Have you tried compiling this? I'm spotting a variable named like a C# keyword... –  Nuffin Jan 16 '12 at 13:34
    
@Tobias - at least some one reads my answers! Thanks for the feedback. That will teach me to make edits to my code on the fly. I added the params variable to stop the horizontal scroll bar appearing (I find horizontal scrolling makes answers less readable - not sure if any one else does though!). Renamed variable to parameters instead. –  Ɖiamond ǤeezeƦ Jan 16 '12 at 13:57

On another note,

instead of sending 10000 of Insert commands to SQLServer in so many operations

when you can create a script that will Add the entire collection in a single operation.

think it is more effective.

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Ordinarily that's what I'd do but I come from a PHP+MySQL background and am not sure about collecting multiple inserts and doing them at once in C#... –  deed02392 Jan 16 '12 at 16:34

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