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I want to write a script that loops through 15 strings (array possibly?) is that possible?

Something like:

for databaseName in listOfNames
then
# do something
end 
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8 Answers 8

up vote 241 down vote accepted

You can use it like this:

## declare an array variable
declare -a arr=("element1" "element2" "element3")

## now loop through the above array
for i in "${arr[@]}"
do
   echo "$i"
   # or do whatever with individual element of the array
done

# You can access them using echo "${arr[0]}", "${arr[1]}" also
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1  
somehow the "" around $i is required to access each array element, can you explain why or point to some material I can read to understand it? Thanks so much! –  olala Sep 26 at 16:22
6  
In BASH it is safer to quote the variable using "" for the cases when $i may contain white spaces or shell expandable characters. –  anubhava Sep 26 at 16:29
    
i see, thanks!! –  olala Sep 26 at 16:32
    
Doesn't work if array elements contain spaces... –  jesjimher Nov 12 at 9:37
    
It does work with spaces in elements if it is quoted like showed above. Better you test it yourself. –  anubhava Nov 12 at 10:19

That is possible, of course.

for databaseName in a b c d e f; do
  # do something
done 

See Bash Loops for, while and until for details.

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3  
What is the problem with this approach? In simple cases it seems to work and, then, is more intuitive than @anubhava's answer. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Aug 30 '12 at 11:54
2  
This works particularly well with command substitution, eg for year in $(seq 2000 2013). –  Brad Koch May 20 '13 at 14:53
2  
Looks nice and clean, I'm taking this one too. –  Manuel Gutierrez Jun 27 '13 at 19:42
2  
The problem is that he asked about iterating through an array. –  mgalgs Jul 18 '13 at 23:00
5  
The 'declare' approach works best if you have to iterate over the same array in more than one place. This approach is cleaner but less flexible. –  Stampy Jan 3 at 10:21

In the same spirit as 4ndrew's answer:

listOfNames="RA
RB
R C
RD"

# To allow for other whitespace in the string:
# 1. add double quotes around the list variable, or
# 2. see the IFS note (under 'Side Notes')

for databaseName in "$listOfNames"   #  <-- Note: Added "" quotes.
do
  echo "$databaseName"  # (i.e. do action / processing of $databaseName here...)
done

# Outputs
# RA
# RB
# R C
# RD

B. No whitespace in the names:

listOfNames="RA
RB
R C
RD"

for databaseName in $listOfNames  # Note: No quotes
do
  echo "$databaseName"  # (i.e. do action / processing of $databaseName here...)
done

# Outputs
# RA
# RB
# R
# C
# RD

Notes

  1. In the second example, using listOfNames="RA RB R C RD" has the same output.

Other ways to bring in data include:

Read from stdin

# line delimited (each databaseName is stored on a line)
while read databaseName
do
  echo "$databaseName"  # i.e. do action / processing of $databaseName here...
done # <<< or_another_input_method_here

Sides Notes

  1. the bash IFS "field separater to line" [1] delimiter can be specified in the script to allow other whitespace (i.e. IFS='\n', or for MacOS IFS='\r')
  2. I like the accepted answer also :) -- I've include these snippets as other helpful ways that also answer the question.
  3. Including #!/bin/bash at the top of the script file indicates the execution environment.
  4. It has taken me months to figure out how to code these simply :)

Other Sources (while read loop)

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This creates impression that eol is used as string separators and, therefore, whitespaces are allowed within the strings. However, strings with whitespaces are further separated into substrings, which is very very bad. I think that this answer stackoverflow.com/a/23561892/1083704 is better. –  Val Jul 11 at 9:02
    
@Val, I added code comment with a reference to IFS. (For everyone, IFS lets one specify a specific delimiter, which allows other whitespace to be included in strings without being separated into substrings). –  user2533809 Jul 21 at 23:43

None of those answers include a counter...

#!/bin/bash
## declare an array variable
declare -a array=("one" "two" "three")

# get length of an array
arraylength=${#array[@]}

# use for loop read all values and indexes
for (( i=1; i<${arraylength}+1; i++ ));
do
  echo $i " / " ${arraylength} " : " ${array[$i-1]}
done

Output:

1  /  3  :  one
2  /  3  :  two
3  /  3  :  three
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This should be the accepted answer, is the only one that works when array elements contain spaces. –  jesjimher Nov 12 at 9:40

The declare array dont work for Korn shell. Use the below for example for korn shell:

promote_sla_chk_lst="cdi xlob"

set -A promote_arry $promote_sla_chk_lst 

for i in ${promote_arry[*]};
    do  
            echo $i
    done
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1  
try the code highlighter in the editor to make your code look good. –  dove Nov 2 '12 at 19:39
1  
Good to know, but this question is about bash. –  Brad Koch May 20 '13 at 14:47

Try this working and tested.

for k in ${array[@]}
do
   echo $k
done

# for accessing with echo command: echo ${array[0]}, ${array[1]}
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You can use the syntax of ${arrayName[@]}

#!/bin/bash
# declare an array called array and define 3 vales
files=( "/etc/passwd" "/etc/group" "/etc/hosts" )
for i in "${files[@]}"
do
    echo $i
done
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If you are using Korn shell, there is "set -A databaseName ", else there is "declare -a databaseName"

To write a script working on all shells,

 set -A databaseName=("db1" "db2" ....) ||
        declare -a databaseName=("db1" "db2" ....)
# now loop 
for dbname in "${arr[@]}"
do
   echo "$dbname"  # or whatever

done

It should be work on all shells.

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