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What is the difference between a standard while(true) loop and for(;;)?

Is there any, or will both be mapped to the same bytecode after compiling?

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3  
Have you tried compiling it and looking at the byte code? –  David M Jan 16 '12 at 13:45
3  
Nothing: stackoverflow.com/search?q=for+while+true –  Lasse Espeholt Jan 16 '12 at 13:45
    
possible duplicate of for(;true;) different from while(true)? –  Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '12 at 17:13

8 Answers 8

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Semantically, they're completely equivalent. It's a matter of taste, but I think while(true) looks cleaner, and is easier to read and understand at first glance. In Java neither of them causes compiler warnings.

At the bytecode level, it might depend on the compiler and the level of optimizations, but in principle the code emitted should be the same.

EDIT:

On my compiler, using the Bytecode Outline plugin,the bytecode for for(;;){} looks like this:

   L0
    LINENUMBER 6 L0
   FRAME SAME
    GOTO L0

And the bytecode for while(true){} looks like this:

   L0
    LINENUMBER 6 L0
   FRAME SAME
    GOTO L0

So yes, at least for me, they're identical.

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4  
Accepted this answer for having provided the code and how it was looked up. Thank you. :) –  sjas Jan 16 '12 at 16:56
1  
for(;;) is the cleaner version, imo (also shorter :P) –  bestsss Jan 22 '12 at 20:46
1  
Note that in VS while(true) causes compilation warnings on the highest settings for C and C++ (C#?). Perhaps not an issue for Java, but if you write in other languages sometimes, for(;;) is a better habit to develop. –  T.E.D. Sep 18 '13 at 15:52
    
+1 for giving reference from byte code ! –  Saif Asif May 5 at 12:02

It's up to you which one to use. Cause they are equals to compiler.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        while (true) {
            System.out.println("Hi");
        }
    }
}

javac -g:none Test.java
rename Test.class Test1.class

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (;;) {
            System.out.println("Hi");
        }
    }
}

# javac -g:none Test.java
# mv Test.class Test2.class
# diff -s Test1.class Test2.class
Files Test1.class and Test2.class are identical
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2  
upvote for the method being used. –  sjas Jun 3 '12 at 18:55

On Oracle Java 7 you get the same byte code. You cannot tell from the byte code which was using in the original. Which is best is a matter of taste. I use while(true)

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Depending upon the compiler, it should map to the same byte code.

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It compiles down to the same byte code, and it is a matter of taste which construct you prefer.

I read a lot of source code from the Oracle distributed JDK, and I cannot easily remember that I've seen a while(true) statement in their code, but I have seen a whole lot of for(;;) statements in their code. Me personally, I favor for(;;) and my reasoning goes a bit like this:

The while-loop "should" require a boolean expression, not a boolean constant. while(true) is a bit like if(true), both of which I think has been made legal only for the added comfort of the masses. An empty while() does not compile. Adding the true in there feels a bit like hacking.

for(;;) on the other hand is a "real loop", albeit an empty one. Also, it saves you a couple of keystrokes! =) (not that it matter)

Therefore, and I know it sounds crazy, but although while(true) reads better in English, I think for(;;) better express your intent and is more akin to the Java programming language. Eternal loops should be avoided anyways. When I read for(;;), I feel secure knowing the developer will brake the execution path somewhere. When I read while(true), I just cannot be that sure anymore. But hey, maybe that's just me! We're all free to pick our own flavor.

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JVM will find the best way to make bytecode and in both cases should do the same.So I think there's no difference. while(true) is just prettier.

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Functionally there is no difference. Any efficiency gained or lost by a difference in bytecode will likely be insignificant compared to any instruction you would run in the body of the loop.

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I have looked at the generated byte code and found that since the condition is always true (at compile time), the compiler will compile away the test and just branch always back to the top of the loop. I assume that a continue statement will also do a branch always back to the top of the loop. So, not only does it not make any difference, there isn't even any code generated to test anything.

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