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I'm creating a Delphi program and i have this code in my program:

begin
  if edit1.Text='salam' then
  begin
    for i := 1 to 10 do
    begin
      progressbar1.Value := progressbar1.Value+1;
      sleep(100);
    end;
  end;
end;

I wanna have the progressbar moving smoothly. But this code isn't like that.
What should i do? I wanna repaint the form after sleep.

share|improve this question
    
You're doing sleep in the GUI thread (where everything else is done) and keeping the UI from repainting. You have to do it in another thread, or use a TIdAntiFreeze component on your form. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 16 '12 at 14:35
    
Surely your real code isn't doing a sleep. What are you trying to achieve. –  David Heffernan Jan 16 '12 at 14:36
1  
I think you forgot the begin after the do, and the end after the sleep. Surely you didn't want to loop over only the line that sets progressbar1.value? –  Warren P Jan 16 '12 at 15:20
    
Why is this tagged ios? –  Warren P Jan 16 '12 at 15:26
    
@WarrenP Read the comments to Cesar's answer. –  David Heffernan Jan 16 '12 at 15:32

1 Answer 1

You should do it like this...

begin
  if edit1.Text='salam' then
  begin
    progressbar1.Step:=1;
    for i := 1 to 10 do
    begin
      progressbar1.StepIt;
      Application.ProcessMessages;
      Sleep(100);
    end
  end;
end;

Windows needs to process the messages to repaint and to know your app isn't frezzed, Application.ProcessMessages does that magic.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't step in my progressbar. I'm creating an iOS HD application. Is it important? –  Sina Jan 16 '12 at 14:47
    
I haven't developed anything for iOS, so i'm not sure that Application.ProcessMessages exists, but if it doesn't there must be an equivalent. –  Cesar Jan 16 '12 at 14:54
3  
This is still wrong in many ways. Your code is fine for a silly demo, but don't ever write code like this in production. You should almost never sleep in the main thread, and certainly never sleep inside a loop. Adding Application.ProcessMessages cures the obvious problem of a frozen main window message loop, but it can cause other interesting side effects in large production applications. –  Warren P Jan 16 '12 at 15:19
1  
@WarrenP is right, but since it's just a simple progress bar, there is no need to write more complicated code to accomplish this. –  Cesar Jan 16 '12 at 15:45
2  
that re-entrancy could allow all sorts of things to happen. For example the progress bar could be destroyed. –  David Heffernan Jan 17 '12 at 7:12

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