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What I've seen so far, there can only be one plugin per .dll file, is that correct? The Browser calls NP_GetEntryPoints, NP_Initialize and NP_Shutdown only "once" per dll, right?

What I'm aiming for is to create multiple plugins in one dynamic library. Is that possible, and if, how?

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If you haven't stumbled upon yet, take a look wether Firebreath fits your project. – Georg Fritzsche Jan 16 '12 at 15:03
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Even if FireBreath doesn't fit your project, it does support multiple mimetypes -- you could build a firebreath plugin and dig through how it does it. – taxilian Jan 16 '12 at 19:37
up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I've seen so far, there can only be one plugin per .dll file, is that correct?

No, you can have multiple plugins implemented in one DLL.

The Browser calls NP_GetEntryPoints, NP_Initialize and NP_Shutdown only "once" per dll, right?

Only once per process and loading (keep in mind that it will be unloaded while when no instance is alive anymore).

What I'm aiming for is to create multiple plugins in one dynamic library. Is that possible, and if, how?

It's possible. You just register the different mimetypes for the same dynamic library (e.g. on Windows several mimetype entries in the registry pointing to the same DLL).

NPP_New() gets a NPMIMEType as it's first parameter, which let's you identify which "plugin" was requested.

Also, NP_GetMIMEDescription() needs to be adjusted (used on Linux and Mac OS).

On Windows you should have the list of mimetypes, seperated by |, in the version info (entry MIMEType).

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Where/when is NP_GetMIMEDescription called? I can see the docs but there is nothing about where to implement the function. – Niklas R Jan 16 '12 at 15:06
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@Niklas: "It works on Unix (Linux) and MacOS." – Georg Fritzsche Jan 16 '12 at 15:20

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