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I perform two queries and get strange result. I'd like to know why is this happening.
Now queries:

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A a, TABLE_B b, TABLE_C c
  WHERE a.a = b.a (+)
  AND b.c = c.c
  AND a.a = 123;

Result is empty.

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TABLE_A a, TABLE_B b, TABLE_C c
  WHERE a.a = b.a (+)
  AND b.c = c.c
  AND a.a = 123;

Result is 1.

It is really the same query with different returned value.
Table A contains row with 'a' field = 123.
Table B does not contain rows as a.a = b.a.

How can nothing or 1 be returned for the same query?


Update:

When I make it this way

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TABLE_A a, TABLE_B b, TABLE_C c
  WHERE a.a = b.a (+)
  AND b.c = c.c (+)
  AND a.a = 123;

It works OK.

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16  
Reform your query using ANSI-92 syntax (LEFT JOIN, etc), and then try it. It's 20 years old, I think it's had time to bed in! –  MatBailie Jan 16 '12 at 15:01
1  
What about TABLE_C? what is in it? –  gdoron Jan 16 '12 at 15:01
2  
@Dems. Damn, I wish I could +1 more than once sometimes... –  David M Jan 16 '12 at 15:02
1  
obviously test tables/data. Why not show entire script with echo on instead of having us guess: create table A ... insert into A ... select ... –  tbone Jan 16 '12 at 15:09
2  
@arcane - It is a good possible explanation. Your query has A OUTER JOIN b but also b INNER JOIN c. The order is important to determine the results: (a OUTER JOIN b) INNER JOIN c or a OUTER JOIN (b INNER JOIN c)? The , notation is ambiguous. If you express this using JOIN notation, the ambiguity of the order is removed, and you can predict the results. It appears that at present the order of operation is different in your two queries, just because the optimiser decided so. –  MatBailie Jan 16 '12 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

Possibly you have indices or foreign key constraints that are not consistent with the table data. Since these two queries most likely use different indices, they return inconsistent data.

Have you temporarily disabled the constrataints, or set them up without validating that they have initially been valid (ENABLE NOVALIDATE)?

Try to rebuild the indices and drop and recreate the foreign key constraints to see whether that fixes your problem.

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