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I'm trying to do the equivalent of the dollowing C# 5 pseudocode:-

async Task<int> CallAndTranslate()
{
    try 
    {
        return await client.CallAsync();
    } catch(FaultException ex) {
        if (ex.FaultCode ...)
            throw new Exception("translated");
    }
}

Given an arbitrary Task which does not return a result, translating exceptions when backporting from C# 5 is easy using the technique supplied by @Drew Marsh

This technique doesn't generalize trivially to Task<T> as any overload of Task.ContinueWith I can see returns a bald Task, not a Task<T>.

Is there a way to achieve this using the TPL APIs without having to resort to:

  • wrapping it in another Task<T>
  • causing the exception to go through the machinations of getting thrown and caught through the exception handling mechanisms
  • ADDED After intial answer.... should leave stack trace alone if exception is not to be translated

Here's my naive placeholder implementation:

public class TranslatingExceptions
{
    Task<int> ApiAsync()
    {
        return Task<int>.Factory.StartNew( () => { 
           throw new Exception( "Argument Null" ); } );
    }

    public Task<int> WrapsApiAsync() 
    {
        return ApiAsync().TranslateExceptions(x=>{
            if (x.Message == "Argument Null" )
                throw new ArgumentNullException();
        });
    }

    [Fact]
    public void Works()
    {
        var exception = Record.Exception( () =>
            WrapsApiAsync().Wait() );
        Assert.IsType<ArgumentNullException>( exception.InnerException );
    }
}

The following Task<T> extension implements my placeholder implementation:

static class TaskExtensions
{
    public static Task<T> TranslateExceptions<T>( this Task<T> task, Action<Exception> translator )
    {
    // TODO REPLACE NAIVE IMPLEMENTATION HERE
        return Task<T>.Factory.StartNew( () =>
        {
            try
            {
                return task.Result;
            }
            catch ( AggregateException exception )
            {
                translator( exception.InnerException );
                throw;
            }
        } );
    }
}
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can imitate await in .NET 4.0 using iterators ( yield ), but it's not pretty.

Without a state machine, you're missing the whole point of await which is to return control to the caller until the work is complete and only then continue execution.

Um, maybe I've missed the point! If you just want to use a ContinueWith<T> it's just a slight tweak to the code from Drew Marsh:

public Task<int> ApiAsync() // The inner layer exposes it exactly this way
{
    return Task<int>.Factory.StartNew( () =>
        { throw new Exception( "Argument Null" ); } );
}

// this layer needs to expose it exactly this way
public Task<int> WrapsApiAsync()
{
    // Grab the task that performs the "original" work
    Task<int> apiAsyncTask = ApiAsync();

    // Hook a continuation to that task that will do the exception "translation"
    Task<int> result = apiAsyncTask.ContinueWith( antecedent =>
    {
        // Check if the antecedent faulted
        // If so check what the exception's message was
        if ( antecedent.IsFaulted )
        {
            if ( antecedent.Exception.InnerException.Message == "Argument Null" )
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException();
            }

            throw antecedent.Exception.InnerException;
        }

        return antecedent.Result;
    },
    TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously );

    // Now we return the continuation Task from the wrapper method
    // so that the caller of the wrapper method waits on that
    return result;
}

UPDATE: sample using TaskCompletionSource

public static Task<int> WrapsApiAsync()
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();

    Task<int> apiAsyncTask = ApiAsync();

    apiAsyncTask.ContinueWith( t =>
        {
            switch ( t.Status )
            {
                case TaskStatus.RanToCompletion:
                    tcs.SetResult( task.Result );
                    break;

                case TaskStatus.Canceled:
                    tcs.SetCanceled();
                    break;

                case TaskStatus.Faulted:

                    if ( t.Exception.InnerException.Message == "Argument Null" )
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            throw new ArgumentNullException();
                        }
                        catch ( ArgumentNullException x )
                        {
                            tcs.SetException( x );
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        tcs.SetException( t.Exception.InnerException );
                    }

                    break;
            }
        }
    );

    return tcs.Task;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for responding. Unfortunately, as noted in the question, **Task**.ContinueWith does not return Task<int> is the problem here, hence asking the question (and casting unsurprisingly doesnt work either). Perhaps, there's a ToTaskOf<T> convertor someone has? Either way, this wont pass in the provided testbed, sorry! (The bit I'm looking to replicate is not the state machine carry on, but the Task<T> juggling). And I cant remember the content of @Jon Skeet's excellent 'destructing async in C# 5' series from last year. –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 16 '12 at 17:26
    
MSDN doesn't show all the overloads of ContinueWith, but there are certainly ones that return Task<T>. This one is closest, but there is also one in .NET 4 RTM that takes a Task<T> as the antecedent. –  Nicholas Butler Jan 16 '12 at 17:39
    
Correct. It's not obvious, but you just return a result from the continuation method and the compiler will choose the appropriate overload resulting in the Task<T>. –  Drew Marsh Jan 16 '12 at 20:22
    
Thanks both. Ah, sorry for originally doubting you (I missed the return antedent.Result bit)! Works perfectly as-is (Tried to add a ContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted etc. but can't see any refinements possible.) Looks like I fell asleep while cycling through the 23 overloads of ContinueWith :D The only missing bit (as pointed out by @Drew Marsh in the previous case) is that the explicit re-throw will drop the original callstack - i.e., I'd ideally like to preserve throw; semantics (or VB filter ones :P). Will accept in due course assuming nobody comes up a no drop stacktrace impl. –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 16 '12 at 21:06
    
@RubenBartelink No problem. I've added a code sample using TaskCompletionSource which doesn't re-throw the original exception. –  Nicholas Butler Jan 17 '12 at 9:49
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