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Here is the condition I used to detect if we are dealing with a Nullable Type :

System.Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(itemType) != null

and here the code of my teammate :

itemType.IsGenericType && itemType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>)

We actually didnt find a case where one will return true and the other false (or vice-versa) but are these 2 snippets strictly equivalent ?

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As I understand it, the non-nullable types are a small finite list. Would it not be more efficient to identify by their presence? –  Jeremy Holovacs Jan 16 '12 at 15:34
1  
@Jeremy: Any struct you create is a non-nullable type. I can't imagine trying to create a list of them. –  Gabe Jan 16 '12 at 15:35
    
Maybe my question isnt clear but the test has to return true with "int ? a" and false with "int b" –  Guillaume Slashy Jan 16 '12 at 15:36
    
As per my understanding of code, your teammate is first checking whether the itemType is Generic type or not and then whether that Generic Type is Nullable or not.. –  VS1 Jan 16 '12 at 15:37
    
@Gabe also, Jeremy is using another interpretation for 'Nullable Type' than the OP. Jeremy appears to understand it as 'reference type' –  sehe Jan 16 '12 at 15:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From MSDN for Nullable.GetUnderlyingType Method:

The type argument of the nullableType parameter, if the nullableType parameter is a closed generic nullable type; otherwise, null.

So, yes it is safe to use the former version.

Decompiled from GetUnderlyingType:

public static Type GetUnderlyingType(Type nullableType)
{
  if (nullableType == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException("nullableType");
  Type type = (Type) null;
  if (nullableType.IsGenericType && !nullableType.IsGenericTypeDefinition && nullableType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof (Nullable<>))
    type = nullableType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
  return type;
}
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Yep, but is it different from the 2nd one ? –  Guillaume Slashy Jan 16 '12 at 15:44
    
See edited answer: it is the same albeit marginally safer and slightly less efficient (unless the compiler inlines it) –  sehe Jan 16 '12 at 15:49
    
ok, GetUnderlyingType is the way to go so ;) –  Guillaume Slashy Jan 16 '12 at 15:53
    
+1 good and fast answer –  DmitryG Jan 16 '12 at 16:00

These 2 snippets are not fully equivalen.
Here is the test case that returns a different values for each snippets:

Type t = typeof(Nullable<>);

bool c1 = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(t) != null; //false
bool c2 = t.IsGenericType && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>); //true

Thus the Nullable.GetUnderlyingType method more safe, because it's implementation already include this test case checking:

public static Type GetUnderlyingType(Type nullableType) {
    if (nullableType == null) 
        throw new ArgumentNullException("nullableType");
    Type type = null;
    if ((nullableType.IsGenericType && !nullableType.IsGenericTypeDefinition)
        && (nullableType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))) {
        type = nullableType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
    }
    return type;
}
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Yep, just get it from sehe's answer ! Thx anyway –  Guillaume Slashy Jan 16 '12 at 15:53

Your teammate's code is perfectly fine as given in the MSDN documentation (excerpt): Use the following code to determine whether a Type object represents a Nullable type. Remember that this code always returns false if the Type object was returned from a call to GetType.

if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>)) {…}

explained at the below MSDN link:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms366789.aspx

Moreover, there is a similar discussion at this SO QA:

How to check if an object is nullable?

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read sehe's and Dimitry's answers :) –  Guillaume Slashy Jan 16 '12 at 15:54
    
@GuillaumeSlashy yup..they both r right.. –  VS1 Jan 16 '12 at 15:56

Whenever testing whether a type is nullable, I've always used the second method you posted:

itemType.IsGenericType && itemType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>) 

I haven't had a problem with this!

Regards,

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We feel like they both are good, but at the same time, we feel like in a certain context, one of them won't work... –  Guillaume Slashy Jan 16 '12 at 15:45

dotPeek shows this:

public static Type GetUnderlyingType(Type nullableType)
{
  if (nullableType == null)
    throw new ArgumentNullException("nullableType");
  Type type = (Type) null;
  if (nullableType.IsGenericType && !nullableType.IsGenericTypeDefinition && object.ReferenceEquals((object) nullableType.GetGenericTypeDefinition(), (object) typeof (Nullable<>)))
    type = nullableType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
  return type;
}

The only difference I see is if itemType is itself generic, ie. typeof (List<>), his will fail. And your is slightly slower because it has to actually find the underlying type.

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