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I am doing some research into common errors and poor assumptions made by junior (and perhaps senior) software engineers.

What was your longest-held assumption that was eventually corrected?

For example, I misunderstood that the size of an integer is not a standard and instead depends on the language and target. A bit embarrassing to state, but there it is.

Be frank; what firm belief did you have, and roughly how long did you maintain the assumption? It can be about an algorithm, a language, a programming concept, testing, or anything else about programming, programming languages, or computer science.

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195 Answers 195

That programming is impossible.

Not kidding, I always thought that programming was some impossible thing to learn, and I always stayed away from it. And when I got near code, I could never understand it.

Then one day I just sat down and read some basic beginner tutorials, and worked my way from there. And today I work as a programmer and I love every minute of it.

To add, I don't think programming is easy, it's a challenge and I love learning more and there is nothing more fun than to solve some programming problem.

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Amen! But, hey, don't proclaim this view from rooftops. We don't want everyone to know programming is fun, now do we? ;) ;P –  Peter Perháč May 20 '09 at 14:30
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MasterPeter: It would give us more fodder for us to increase our rep when they come here asking questions. –  TheTXI May 20 '09 at 14:32
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I would say that programming is hard to do right. It is, however, possible, which seems to be your point. –  Steve S May 20 '09 at 14:33
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@Olafur: Why would you want the question to be wiki, but not your answer? –  gnovice May 20 '09 at 14:52
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This mirrors my experience exactly. I wish I'd started sooner now :P –  Skilldrick May 20 '09 at 14:59

That programming is easy.

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Programming is easy. Programming well or programming correctly, those are not so easy. –  jmucchiello May 21 '09 at 15:21

That bugfree software was possible.

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+1, although NASA almost managed it –  Patrick McDonald May 20 '09 at 14:31
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Yes but the "almost" cost a few million of dollars :) –  Jem May 20 '09 at 15:04
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@Triynko your "possible" and @JaredPar's "possible" are not the same. Theory and practice might be the same in theory but are very different in practice. –  wilhelmtell May 22 '09 at 2:30
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@Joseph, part of the problem is people think Hello World programs are bug free. They're not. Most do not check for errors in printf for instance or account for other failed IO attempts. –  JaredPar May 22 '09 at 18:01
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@RussellH, no. You've failed to specify a return value and the resulting process will return random garbage memory. –  JaredPar Sep 29 '09 at 5:37

That nonprogrammers understand what I'm talking about.

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understand/care.. –  nickf May 20 '09 at 15:15
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I still have this one at times... I thought at least my wife would have started to understand properly by now :P –  workmad3 May 21 '09 at 7:35
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Oh dear, I fear I may be yet to learn this! –  thatismatt May 21 '09 at 17:09
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yeah, sometimes i forget my audience and end up with a bunch of people wtih blank looks on thier face stairing at me, it's nice when people show an interest though –  Petey B Jun 5 '09 at 19:41
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This is my biggest frustration with the profession. –  Andres Jaan Tack Jun 24 '10 at 11:03

That private member variables were private to the instance and not the class.

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I held that assumption until... just now. –  TheMissingLINQ May 20 '09 at 15:29
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@ebrown I usually only find it useful when writing an equals() method –  Dave Webb May 20 '09 at 18:13
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They are in Ruby. –  Mike Kucera May 20 '09 at 20:48
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This is so normal to me that this answer didn't make sense the first few times I read it. Now I want to learn Ruby so it can confuse me the other way. :) –  jmucchiello May 21 '09 at 15:13
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@Kiewic If you have a private member variable called myVar inside your class you can reference other.myVar directly in your code if other is an instance of this class. I had assumed because it was "private" you had to use other.getMyVar() even inside the class. –  Dave Webb Jun 19 '09 at 15:43

Having No defects is possible before going live.

It is definitely not true, even P2 defects get left open at times.

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How about the assumption that your internal names for priority levels are my internal names for priority levels? Over here, what y'all call TPS reports are called SRP reports! ;) –  Doug McClean Jun 19 '09 at 14:44

That condition checks like:

if (condition1 && condition2 && condition3)

are performed in an unspecified order...

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In what language? Languages like C/C++, Java, and Python guarantee that the conditions are evaluated left to right and that evaluation stops at the first condition that returns false. It's part of the langauge spec. I assume that most other languages make the same guarantee. –  Clint Miller May 20 '09 at 15:49
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@Clint: Yeah, hence "that turned out to be incorrect". –  bzlm May 20 '09 at 16:22
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actually, this one depends on the language, and & will evaluate all conditions (not shortcut). And I've seen many people use And (&) in VB instead of AndAlso (&&) –  Lucas May 20 '09 at 20:44
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. . . Actually it will crash in VB.net too unless you use AndAlso re Lucas' comment –  Binary Worrier May 21 '09 at 8:28

That anything other than insertion/bubble sort was quite simply dark magic.

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I am a RESEARCHER in sorting algorithms! And they STILL feel like dark magic. –  SPWorley May 20 '09 at 19:31
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I once had a line of code in my program that was a long and complicated and I didn't feel like breaking it up or explaining it (it was some complicated lighting formula), so I put it all on one line and #define'd it to be DARK_MAGICK, and the only comment was a warning against trying to unravel the mysteries of the dark magick –  Alex May 23 '09 at 10:26
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Bogosort is the most mysterious of them all. –  Alex Beardsley Jun 2 '09 at 5:06

I used to assume it's enough to program Win32 applications.

Also that every program must come with a GUI, because command-line is "outdated".

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That all languages are (mostly) created equal.

For a good long while I figured that the language of choice didn't really make much of a difference in the difficulty of the development process and the potential for project success. This is definitely not true.

Choosing the right language for the job is as important/critical as any other single project decision that is made.

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I feel that chosing the right libraries is what matters. It just so happens there's often a 1-to-1 correspondence between languages and libraries... –  Kevin Montrose May 21 '09 at 5:07
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But if two programming languages are both Turing complete then what's the difference? You can write any program in either language! ;) –  Bill the Lizard May 21 '09 at 14:17
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I disagree, the decision what language to use is way less important than who will actually be implementing the project. As just one example of many other more important decisions. –  Boris Terzic May 22 '09 at 13:53
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BrainFu** is as turing complete as python is. –  hasenj May 27 '09 at 18:31
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That Turing complete languages are somehow equally applicable is a common misconception. A Turing complete language can compute everything that a Turing machine can (and often implied the other way around too). There is absolutely no implications regarding performance. An operation that takes linear time in one language could very well take exponential time on another and they could still both be Turing complete. There's a huge difference between what's theoretically computable and what is feasible in practice. –  TrayMan Jun 10 '09 at 6:34

That people knew what they wanted.

For the longest time I thought I would talk with people, they would describe a problem or workflow and I would put it into code and automate it. Turns out every time that happens, what they thought they wanted wasn't actually what they wanted.

Edit: I agree with most of the comments. This is not a technical answer and may not be what the questioner was looking for. It doesn't apply only to programming. I'm sure it's not my longest-held assumption either, but it was the most striking thing I've learned in the 10 short years I've been doing this. I'm sure it was pure naivete on my part but the way my brain is/was wired and the teaching and experiences I had prior to entering the business world led me to believe that I would be doing what I answered; that I would be able to use code and computers to fix people's problems.

I guess this answer is similar to Robin's about non-programmers understanding/caring about what I'm talking about. It's about learning the business as an agile, iterative, interactive process. It's about learning the difference between being a programming-code-monkey and being a software developer. It's about realizing that there is a differnce between the two and that to be really good in the field, it's not just syntax and typing speed.

Edit: This answer is now community-wiki to appease people upset at this answer giving me rep.

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Or change what they want after seeing what they previously wanted. People like to change their minds. I know, cuz I'm a people. –  J. Polfer May 20 '09 at 14:36
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You were giving them what they asked for, not what they wanted. –  Brent Baisley May 20 '09 at 15:43
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Why do boring uncontroversial no-answers get up-voted so excessively?! –  nes1983 May 20 '09 at 16:50
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Wow. Sounds like someone needs a hug. –  bzlm May 20 '09 at 20:26
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My god @ people complaining, stackoverflow rep is not a competition. Upvote if you enjoyed the answer, don't downvote because you are jealous you didn't post it first. –  Dmitri Farkov May 21 '09 at 21:12

For the first few years I was programming I didn't catch on that 1 Kbyte is technically 1024 bytes, not 1000. I was always a little perplexed by the fact that the sizes of my data files seemed slightly off from what I expected them to be.

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Hard drive manufacturers still haven't caught on... –  Michael Myers May 20 '09 at 14:31
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@mmyers I think you mean hard drive marketers right? Or are the drives actually built like that? –  Instantsoup May 20 '09 at 14:38
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Hey, stop the kibi hating. MeBi and KiBi are at least unbambiguobus. –  bzlm May 20 '09 at 16:30
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Kilo means 1000, Mega means 1000000, Giga means 1000000000. It's the RAM and OS makers that got it wrong, not the drive makers. –  Mark Ransom May 20 '09 at 17:26
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No one's going to do it? Seriously? Okay, I'll do it... xkcd.com/394 –  Erik Forbes May 20 '09 at 19:15

That XML namespaces (or worse, well formedness) are in some way more difficult than trying to do without them.

A very common blunder, even at the W3C!

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I believed that creating programs would be exactly like what was taught in class...you sit down with a group of people, go over a problem, come up with a solution, etc. etc. Instead, the real world is "Here is my problem, I need it solved, go" and ten minutes later you get another, leaving you no real time to plan out your solution efficiently.

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I think that's called life. –  Robin Day May 20 '09 at 15:19
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hmmm.. it's time you bail out that company. .. –  jpinto3912 May 20 '09 at 21:24
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@jpinto3912: No. Because the next company will also be a part of life (see previous comment). –  Treb May 21 '09 at 21:41

That .NET structs (C# and VB.NET) were reference types, just like classes.

I "received" that piece of wisdom at some point shortly before or after .NET 1.0 arrived on the scene (I've no idea where from, it may have sprung whole from my mind, like Athena from the brow of Zeus), and kept it until disabused of the notion by Jon Skeet about 4 months ago.

Thanks Jon.

P.S. Not programming related, but I also believed (until about 5 minutes ago) that "Apollo sprang whole from the brow of Zeus".

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Athena came from the brow of Zeus. Apollo was born the old fashioned way –  Brian Postow May 20 '09 at 15:20
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If you use Vb.Net, you are studying the classics every day. –  bzlm May 20 '09 at 16:28

That C++ was somehow intrinsically better than all other languages.

This I received from a friend a couple of years ahead of me in college. I kept it with me for an embarrassingly long time (I'm blushing right now). It was only after working with it for 2 years or so before I could see the cracks for what they were.

No one - and nothing - is perfect, there is always room for improvement.

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It's not?! Uh oh.... –  Drew Hall May 20 '09 at 16:34
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"better" will bring you tons of less-than-hateful comments. But I would say it is one of the most fast-executing, flexible, free-from-hurdles one. It's also one that takes your youth to proper learn it, only to find you could do more or less the same app. (albeit requiring some extra tonne or two of electricity-generating coal) with java or C#. –  jpinto3912 May 20 '09 at 21:35
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I've always assumed C++ is worse than straight ANSI C, simply because the kind of trouble that I've seen C++ programmers get into is so much more complicated than the kind of trouble I've seen C programmers get into. –  Nosredna May 27 '09 at 21:54
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Actually, the language that's better than all other is Common Lisp. C++ isn't bad, though. –  David Thornley Jun 3 '09 at 20:49

That software engineers are always honest about what they are doing now or done to your software in the past.

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"On Error Resume Next" was some kind of error handling

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I feel you...but in vbscript (esp. asp), it was the ONLY "error handling" option available, combined with judicious checking whether an error actually occurred, and a fair amount of prayer. –  flatline May 20 '09 at 15:37
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Yeah... it is some kind... just a kind that we are glad to be getting away from –  Matthew Whited May 20 '09 at 19:41
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Well?! but it is. You start your error-handling block with On Error Resume Next, try something, and then If (err.number<>0) then –  jpinto3912 May 20 '09 at 21:22

Ok, I learned programming rather early. I was 14 or so. And I held all kinds of crazy beliefs, but don't ask me about the precise timing, because that was a … long while ago.

  • Ok, so, I believed for a while that if you use the term synchronize in Java, then Java solves this nasting synchronizing thing for you

  • I believed for at least half a year, likely more, that static typing would improve performance.

  • I believed that freeing something would return memory back to the OS.

  • I believed that malloc calls boil down to checking if there is enough free space on the OS, so malloc would be inexpensive.

  • I thought a long while that Java was built with all the benefits and flaws of the other languages in mind, into a "perfect blend" that would take the best properties of the other languages and reject the mistakes.

  • I vastly overestimated the number of cases where LinkedLists outperform ArrayLists.

  • I thought that NP-hardness was a proof that no INSTANCE could be solved efficiently, which is trivially false, for a while.

  • I thought that finding the best flight-plan on travel agency web sites would take so long because of the "Travelling Salesman Problem", as I proudly chuckled to my relatives (when I was small, alright?!)

Could come up with more. No idea how long I sticked to each of them. Sorry.

PS:
Ahh, ok, this one got cleared up not so slowly, but I see newbies do this every now and then, so I thought you might be interested: I also thought that to store an uncertain number of things, you'd need to declare a new variable for each. So I'd create variables a1, a2, a3, ..., rather than using one variable a, which I would declare to be a vector.

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No, no - you're supposed to create a1, a2, a3 etc but they're ALL supposed to be vectors. –  AviD May 24 '09 at 10:42
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That traveling salesman just made my day. :D –  Andrew Szeto Jul 15 '09 at 2:47
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Wait, so after half a year your statically-typed program runs slower? Memory gets "long" when you free it? free space on the OS? ...?! –  Qwertie Jul 8 '10 at 20:32

That optimizing == rewriting in assembly language.

When I first really understood assembly (coming from BASIC) it seemed that the only way to make code run faster was to rewrite it in assembly. Took quite a few years to realize that compilers can be very good at optimization and especially with CPUs with branch prediction etc they can probably do a better job than a human can do in a reasonable amount of time. Also that spending time on optimizing the algorithm is likely to give you a better win than spending time converting from a high to a low level language. Also that premature optimization is the root of all evil...

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Peek and Poke are your friends :) –  Matthew Whited May 20 '09 at 19:38
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Pervert! Say that to the judge! –  scraimer Jul 29 '09 at 9:09
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This is where complexity theory comes in. Assembly is generally micro optimization. Making your algorithms time complexity smaller is where speed is gained. –  PeteT Dec 17 '09 at 13:29

Of course you could look at FindBugs and PMD but these are my favorite gotchas and tricks (all Java):

Fields are not overridden, they are shadowed.

There is no explicit super.super access.

Classes with no constructors defined have an implicit zero-argument constructor. I made a practical error related to this one this year.

To get a reference to an inner class's parent you can use the syntax "Outer.this" to disambiguate method calls or synchronize.

Classes are "friends of themselves" in C++ terms, private methods and fields of any instance of that class can be referenced from any method of the same class, even static methods. This would have made some of my early clone() and copy constructors much simpler.

Protected methods and fields are accessable in a static context of extending classes, but only if that class is in the same package. I'm glad that flex.messaging.io.amf isn't a sealed package.

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That the quality of software will lead to greater sales. Sometimes it does but not always.

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Selling software? That's so 1999. –  bzlm May 20 '09 at 16:25
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Microsoft sure makes a killing at it. –  Bill Martin May 21 '09 at 13:44
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Also true of music, sadly. –  RedFilter May 21 '09 at 16:16
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I wish that improving the quality / performance of our software counted as a feature –  Tom Leys May 21 '09 at 21:21

This is embarrassing, but for the longest time I didn’t really grasp the difference between reference types and value types. I thought to you had to use the ref keyword to change an object in a different method.

This is one of the most fundamental concepts to C# that I should have known.

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That 640K should to be enough for anybody (DOS). That was widely believed by a lot of people for a number of years.

The first time I had a system with 8MB of RAM, I thought that was far more than I needed. That ran the OS (Mac) plus all the applications I was using (Word, Email, Firefox, etc).

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You ran firefox on an 8MB machine? What decade was this, and how did you get a hold of such an early copy ;) (intended sarcarm) –  Evert May 20 '09 at 15:53
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You're right, it was Mosaic (NCSA?). I actually meant to say FoxBase, not Firefox. And there was a program called "Mail", which Microsoft bought. They also bought Fox Software, makers of Foxbase. –  Brent Baisley May 23 '09 at 23:25
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@Brent Baisley: then why don't you edit your answer? –  Cristian Ciupitu Jun 25 '10 at 16:29

That I know where the performance problem is without profiling

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I think this is why premature optimization is so common place. –  Hao Wooi Lim May 21 '09 at 5:21
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+1 Wow, someone included an answer that wasn't trivial or off-topic. –  Mark Rogers May 21 '09 at 17:09
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I've got some tablets that should help with premature optimization... –  AndyM Aug 28 '09 at 7:55

I thought I should move towards abstracting as much as possible. I got hit in the head major with this, because of too much intertwined little bits of functionality.

Now I try keep things as simple and decoupled as possible. Refactoring to make something abstract is much easier than predicting how I need to abstract something.

Thus I moved from developing the framework that rules them all, to snippets of functionality that get the job done. Never looked back, except when I think about the time I naively thought I would be the one developing the next big thing.

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Decoupled = true Abstraction. Abstract for its own sake is... premature optimization. –  Jared Updike May 21 '09 at 4:28
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This goes along with what I've found doing performance tuning. There can be a lovely program with multiple layers of abstraction. Then the workload gets heavy, and guess what is costing all the time ... all the abstractions. Computers execute instructions, not abstractions. –  Mike Dunlavey May 21 '09 at 14:02
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Abstraction and generalisation are powerful tools, sadly used to generalise an abstract use case with one single implementation. The funny thing is that whenever there is a need to change the implementation, the abstractions and generalisations have to change too... –  KarlP May 21 '09 at 15:08

That all OOP languages have the same concept of object orientation.

  • A Java interface != a method's interface.
  • A Java interface is a language-specific solution for the need to have multiple inheritance. Ruby's mixins attempt to solve the same problem.
  • Inheritance provided out of the box in Javascript is very different from how Java implements inheritance.
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That my programming would be faster and better if I performed it alone.

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That all depends on the other person. =) –  JohnFx May 23 '09 at 16:14

I thought that static typing was sitting very still at your keyboard.

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Sincere or not, this made me laugh hard at the end of a long day of work. :P –  MrZombie May 20 '09 at 21:02
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++ for a good laugh. sounds like something my (non-technical) husband would come up with. –  jess May 23 '09 at 0:29
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+1! I thought duck typing involved typing too. Or ducks. Or both. –  SqlACID Jun 10 '09 at 15:03

I thought mainstream design patterns were awesome, when they were introduced in a CS class. I had programmed about 8 years as hobby before that, and I really didn't have solid understanding of how to create good abstractions.

Design patterns felt like magic; you could do really neat stuff. Later I discovered functional programming (via Mozart/Oz, OCaml, later Scala, Haskell, and Clojure), and then I understood that many of the patterns were just boilerplate, or additional complexity, because the language wasn't expressive enough.

Of course there are almost always some kind of patterns, but they are in a higher level in expressive languages. Now I've been doing some professional coding in Java, and I really feel the pain when I have to use a convention such as visitor or command pattern, instead of pattern matching and higher order functions.

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Not true, how is it boilerplate to have first class stuff instead of limiting the capabilities of a programmer, like in the case of higher order functions. Lisps are beautiful example of this. –  egaga May 21 '09 at 10:01

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