Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am doing some research into common errors and poor assumptions made by junior (and perhaps senior) software engineers.

What was your longest-held assumption that was eventually corrected?

For example, I misunderstood that the size of an integer is not a standard and instead depends on the language and target. A bit embarrassing to state, but there it is.

Be frank; what firm belief did you have, and roughly how long did you maintain the assumption? It can be about an algorithm, a language, a programming concept, testing, or anything else about programming, programming languages, or computer science.

share

locked by Shog9 Aug 22 '12 at 0:27

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

closed as not constructive by Kev Jan 27 '12 at 1:55

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

comments disabled on deleted / locked posts

195 Answers

In school, you are taught the programming is "read input, process data, write output". In reality, there is rarely a processing step -- Most coding is just "read input, output"

Generally, it's either "read from user, write to database" or "read from database, display on screen". Those two cases cover about 95% of the work you'll ever do.

share
show 2 more comments

Satisfy a customer by implenting what he wants - unfortunately this implies that a customer knows what he wants.

share
add comment

The less code the better. Now I know that sometimes it's worth to have more lines of code if it makes easier to read/understand

share
add comment

That other people would be as bothered by known bugs as I was, and would make fixing them a priority over project work.

share
add comment

That the benefit of OOP is that you get to reuse the object, when in reality it's the resuse of the rest of the code by creating a new object that has the same interface.

In reality, the object might be 2% of the code so reuse gets you only 2% benefit. The real benefit is reusing other 98% of the code by creating a new object that allows all the other code to something completely different. Now you have reuse of 98% of the code. Well worth th 3x longer it takes to write something as an object.

E.g., If you have a drawing program and suddenly there is a new shape you want to be able to draw you just change the ShapeObject (while keeping the interface the same). Nothing else in the program has to change.

share
add comment

That I wouldn't need to rapidly refactor my Object oriented code. Martin Fowler finally opened my eyes.

share
add comment

That tests were just another method of procrastination.

share
add comment

That PHP's mysql_fetch_row was the only way to retrieve data from an executed SQL query.

Honestly - I programmed an entire web application without using mysql_fetch_array, and had to change bunches of numbers every time I wanted to change the function to add an extra column.

share
show 1 more comment

That I would never find a practical use in programming for the Karnaugh maps I was taught in my computer science curriculum.

share
add comment

That Python was an impractical, annoying language (I can still read some comments on my early code, complaining about it) and C++ what the only true object-oriented language.

I was so wrong I still fill ashamed.

share
add comment

I taught myself C by reading K&R. Unfortunately, I did not read it word for word and must have missed a few things. I wrote my own versions of malloc and calloc that I carried around with me from job to job, because I didn't realize you could just link in with existing libraries. I did this for several years until someone finally asked me why I was carting that stuff around, "um ... you DO realize you could just link in the existing libraries, right?"

share
add comment

That all OOP languages have the same concept of object orientation.

  • A Java interface != a method's interface.
  • A Java interface is a language-specific solution for the need to have multiple inheritance. Ruby's mixins attempt to solve the same problem.
  • Inheritance provided out of the box in Javascript is very different from how Java implements inheritance.
share
add comment

If you can't read my code, you just don't know the language. I had a few code reviews where I tried to counter with that.

Took a couple more years to learn there's a time and place to be magical with your code and it is in the libraries, not the application. The app is for clarity and readability. Magic is best used when hidden behind extension methods and frameworks.

share
1  
In fact, you should never be magical. It's simple to write code to do what you want. I can imagine 6-7 ways of doing the same thing. Only a couple of those are easy for others, or yourself in 6 months, to read. That's the real challenge. That's the real goal of programming - to make it easy for other humans to read. Even in a library, other people will need to extend or modify it. Always keep it readable. –  Kieveli May 21 '09 at 16:45
show 1 more comment

That I grok programming. By studying the SICP book I saw that I knew nothing. At least now I am delving into programming more.

share
add comment

the assumption that if i write code really well and as bug free as possible, and that's the best thing i can do. turns out sometimes the managers prefer people who try to become their favorite instead of doing nice work.

share
1  
The good programmer is both the favorite and code really well ! :D –  Nicolas Dorier May 21 '09 at 15:38
1  
Slashene: Great Comment :-). But obviously, people who try to please their manager are not the one who are the more serious in their work (are you?:-) )... And most of time when trying to do a better work (with fewer bugs), you take more time to do it: something your manager will always disagree with (even when you know you HAVE to do it). –  yves Baumes May 21 '09 at 23:08
show 1 more comment

That programming elegance combined with automation was an adequate substitute for good old-fashioned testing.

share
add comment

That somehow a company that runs a large number of fairly high profile/high traffic websites actually knew what the heck they were doing. It ended up they were for the most part clueless and extremely lucky to be in the position that they were in. So I guess the moral would be,

solid software engineering && best practices != business success

or....

most critical software systems == crap

share
show 2 more comments

Not longest-held, but at some point and for several years I:

  • Thought Microsoft Windows was the only Operating System in the world ( it was 1992 )
  • Knowing DOS was more than enough to have "advanced" OS knowledge.

That's why I didn't choose "computer course" in high school. I thought that I knew already enough about computers.

Later at university and out of my mistake:

  • I thought that UNIX os/programs were perfect and DOS/Windows won't ever come any close to it ( back then it look so true, I guess Linus at al thought the same and that's why Linux is sooo similar to UNIX and not.. well other OS's )

Finally and for a long time, I thought that:

  • Only my software sucks and commercial software was flawless, because... it was "COMERCIAL" software
  • USA software/engineers/products were synonyms of excellence and anything outside were just poor attempts.
share
show 1 more comment

I thought Windows 3.1 was only a platform to play solitaire. And DOS is a platform for BASICA.

share
add comment

Error handling is unnecessary when you have tested your code thoroughly.

share
add comment

That always there is not enough time to finish it before deadline.

share
add comment

That a WTF is always an evidence of a bad professional.

In fact I've been realizing recently how many WTF's I committed myself throughout my career, but I was comforted when StackOverflow showed me they are just another software metric.

share
add comment

That variables are actually just names for specific areas in the memory.

share
add comment

That creating a successful application can easily be done by only programmers. Software is also about ease of use, good looks, documentation and proper marketing. Software development is multi disciplinary and failing one discipline will probably fail the application.

share
add comment

That a language suitable for systems programming must support [mutable] variables.

share
add comment

Common poor assumptions: "Quality of Code is secondary". Even poorer assumption: "Quality of code is not important at all."

Quality of code can be a very broad concept. I disscued it quite thoroughly here.

share
add comment

That the more lines of code then the better the software would be.

share
1  
Wow, that's one you definitely don't want. I spend a lot of time cleaning up code. The less lines the better. (and clearer syntax). –  CodeJoust Oct 13 '09 at 2:22
add comment

That you could memset( this, 0, sizeof(TheObject) ) a C++ object in its constructor with no negative consequences

share
show 1 more comment

That marketing guys care about what you do.

share
1  
Actually, that marketing guys UNDERSTAND what is possible and what isn't, so they don't try to sell the solution to famine everywhere in the world. –  Eduardo León Aug 31 '09 at 13:18
add comment

That you needed a client specification to complete a project. More times than not you start with a sales meeting and a notepad. Of course at the end of the meeting they would like a deadline, "just ballpark it".

share
add comment

protected by skaffman Feb 23 '12 at 21:12

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.