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I've read through the definitions of transactions on this site, as well as some other external sources. But I'm having a hard time grappling with the specific notion of a transaction when writing code.

I have a BuyService class that is transactional. The BuyService class is declared transactional, and its only method is buyWidget(String widgetId). This method calls on the ExampleService class, which has a deleteWidgit(String widgetId) method. It also calls on the InvoiceService class, which uses the writeInvoice(String widgitId) method. Here is the code:

BuyService class:

import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Propagation;
import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional;

@Transactional
public class BuyService implements BuyServiceInterface
{
private ExampleServiceInterface exampleService;
private InvoiceServiceInterface invoiceService;

public void setExampleService(ExampleServiceInterface exampleService)
{
    this.exampleService = exampleService;
}

public void setInvoiceService(InvoiceServiceInterface invoiceService)
{
    this.invoiceService = invoiceService;
}

@Override
@Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRED)
public void buyWidget(Widget widgetId)
{
    try
    {
        Widget purchasedWidget = this.exampleService.getWidgetById(String widgetId);
        this.exampleService.deleteWidget(purchasedWidget);
        this.invoiceService.writeInvoice(purchasedWidget);
    }
    catch (WidgetNotFoundException e)
    {
        System.out.println("Widget with widgetId " + widgetId + " not found.");
    }
}
}

I am pretty sure that the buyWidget method constitutes a transaction. It requires the deletion of a widget in a database (in exampleService) and the insertion of data in the purchase database (in invoiceService). But I am confused about terminology after this point. Are the methods deleteWidget and writeInvoice themselves transactions as well?

ExampleService class:

public class ExampleService implements ExampleServiceInterface
    {   
private ExampleServiceDaoInterface dao;

public void setExampleServiceDao(ExampleServiceDaoInterface dao)
{
    this.dao = dao;
}

@Override
public void deleteWidget(Widget oldWidget) 
        throws WidgetNotFoundException
{
    this.dao.delete(oldWidget);
}

@Override
public Widget getWidgetById(String widgetId)
{
    return this.dao.getById(widgetId);
}
}

InvoiceService class:

public class InvoiceService implements InvoiceServiceInterface
{   
private InvoiceServiceDaoInterface InvoiceServiceDao;

public void setInvoiceServiceDao(InvoiceServiceDaoInterface InvoiceServiceDao)
{
    this.InvoiceServiceDao = InvoiceServiceDao;
}

@Override
public void writeInvoice(Widget purchasedWidget)
{
    Date purchaseDate = new Date(new java.util.Date().getTime());
    String isbn = purchasedWidget.getIsbn();
    Purchases newPurchase = new Purchases(purchaseDate, isbn);
    this.InvoiceServiceDao.savePurchase(newPurchase);
}
} 

Are the two methods called on by buyWidget transactions as well? That is, even if neither of those methods are declared as transactions. What are some potential pitfalls of not declaring the two child methods as transactions? (Since they apparently appear to be a part of one already).

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It is generally a good idea to leave out code not directly related to the question, such as accessors/mutators/exceptions etc. –  Johan Sjöberg Jan 16 '12 at 17:07
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Are the methods deleteWidget and writeInvoice themselves transactions as well?

They will take part in the buyWidget transaction, but they are not by themselves transactional

Are the two methods called on by buyWidget transactions as well?

The transaction is started before entering the buyWidget method and stopped or rolled back before the method is completed. The two methods will take part in the buyWidget transaction, but are not themselves transactions.

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Are the two methods called on by buyWidget transactions as well?

None of the methods are transactions. The annotation @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRED) means " Support a current transaction, create a new one if none exists." This transaction will include anything called from the buyWidget() method. Basically, when the method is entered a transaction is started, and when it's exited that transaction will be committed (if everything works out) or rolled back (if there is an Exception thrown, a problem on the DB side, or the transaction is rolled back via Java code).

That is, even if neither of those methods are declared as transactions.

As long as those methods operate on a DB that is aware of JTA, it will work with the existing transaction.

What are some potential pitfalls of not declaring the two child methods as transactions? (Since they apparently appear to be a part of one already).

If those methods are called directly, they will not be part of a transaction. This could result in an inconsistent state of the DB if those methods result in multiple SQL statements (it doesn't look like that, but cannot be definitely ruled out just by looking at the code).

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I plan to use these two methods only when buying a widget. So there is risk only if there are use cases in which the child methods are called directly... is that correct? At any rate, I will make a mental note to make sure that ALL of my methods accessing a database will be transactions. Finally, what difference would there be if those two child methods WERE transactions? –  harryo Jan 16 '12 at 17:08
    
@user, A good design is to separate logic into a repository and a service implementation (service uses repository, repository interfaces database), and only make the service transactional. –  Johan Sjöberg Jan 16 '12 at 17:12
    
@JohanSjoberg; Just to confirm, are you referring to "Repository and Service" pattern? I conducted an online search of your recommendation, and that seemed to be what you meant. But I need to make sure before I begin to investigate the concept. –  harryo Jan 16 '12 at 17:17
    
@user, yes, see for instance this excellent blog post: carinae.net/2009/11/…. The "DAO Layer" is the same as Repository. –  Johan Sjöberg Jan 16 '12 at 17:20
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