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You can "change" the key of an array element simply by setting the new key and removing the old:

$array[$newKey] = $array[$oldKey];
unset($array[$oldKey]);

But this will move the key to the end of the array.

Is there some elegant way to change the key without changing the order?

(PS: This question is just out of conceptual interest, not because I need it anywhere.)

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I'd imagine some ugly construct with array_splice() and array_slice() would do the trick –  Marc B Jan 16 '12 at 17:49
    
@MarcB That wouldn't work with string keys though. –  NikiC Jan 16 '12 at 17:51
    
I'm not a PHP programmer, but what in the world are the semantics of $arr[$oldKey] if this works as an argument to a function which removes $oldKey from $arr? I think PHP might be more interesting than I previously thought, will have to look into this … –  Felix Dombek Jan 16 '12 at 19:53
    
@FelixDombek I'm not sure I get you. $array[$oldKey] will just return the value with the key $oldKey. –  NikiC Jan 16 '12 at 20:00
1  
@NikiC That's what I also thought, but if it evaluates to, say, 5, then how does unset() delete the element from the array? How does PHP even know in which array it should delete the value 5? –  Felix Dombek Jan 16 '12 at 20:04
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6 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Tested and works :)

$array = array( "a" => "1", "b" => "2", "c" => "3" );

function replace_key($array, $old_key, $new_key) {
    $keys = array_keys($array);
    if (false === $index = array_search($old_key, $keys)) {
        throw new Exception(sprintf('Key "%s" does not exit', $old_key));
    }
    $keys[$index] = $new_key;
    return array_combine($keys, array_values($array));
}

$new_array = replace_key($array, "b", "e");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Though you probably should add an error handler for the case that $old_key is not in the array. –  Felix Kling Jan 16 '12 at 17:53
    
Only if the key doesn't exist then replace the first one. Add an if clause, and youre ok;) –  Kristian Jan 16 '12 at 17:54
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Something like this may also work:

$langs = array("EN" => "English", 
        "ZH" => "Chinese", 
        "DA" => "Danish",
        "NL" => "Dutch", 
        "FI" => "Finnish", 
        "FR" => "French",
        "DE" => "German");
$json = str_replace('"EN":', '"en":', json_encode($langs));
print_r(json_decode($json, true));

OUTPUT:

Array
(
    [en] => English
    [ZH] => Chinese
    [DA] => Danish
    [NL] => Dutch
    [FI] => Finnish
    [FR] => French
    [DE] => German
)
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4  
I personally find this solution very elegant! +1 –  Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 15:01
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One way would be to simply use a foreach iterating over the array and copying it to a new array, changing the key conditionally while iterating, e.g. if $key === 'foo' then dont use foo but bar:

function array_key_rename($array, $oldKey, $newKey) 
{
    foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
        $newArray[$key === $oldKey ? $newKey : $key] = $value;
    }
    return $newArray;
}

Another way would be to serialize the array, str_replace the serialized key and then unserialize back into an array again. That isnt particular elegant though and likely error prone, especially when you dont only have scalars or multidimensional arrays.

A third way - my favorite - would be you writing array_key_rename in C and proposing it for the PHP core ;)

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I can't see how we can change the key directly.

Here is my implementation of a one to one replacement; no promises though...

My attempt is to do the following:

1) Loop only once through the array!

2) Handle the memory usage with: (new + 1) , (old - 1). In other words: keep it one to one; add one here, clean up there.

Now the code:

    $oldArray = array('foo' => array('we', 'are', 'family'), 'bar' => array('who', 'let', 'the', 'dogs', 'cat'), 'foobar' => 'Im not a subArray hahaha; I\'m such a troll.', 'I am key' => 'I am value', 'I am also a key' => 'I am value');
    $oldIndex = 'foobar';
    $newIndex = 'foo? you meand food right.. and bar chocolade.. hmmmm';
    /* The Dramatic swapKey function */
    function swapKeys(&$oldArray, $oldIndex, $newIndex)
    {
            if (isset($oldArray[$newIndex])) {
                    return false;//nononononono! The new key already exists! You broke the world!
            }
            if (!isset($oldArray[$oldIndex])) {
                    return false;//nononononono! They old key does not exist! You broke the world!
            }
            foreach ($oldArray as $index => $subArray) {
                    if ($oldIndex === $index) {
                            $newArray[$newIndex] = $subArray;
                    } else {
                            $newArray[$index] = $subArray;
                    }
                    unset($oldArray[$index]); //free memory as we iterate through the array
            }
            //$oldArray = null; //make the final blow and murder this old bastard! (if you only want the "algorithm" but not the function...)
            /*remove:start*/
            echo 'This is old dog';
            echo '<pre>';
                    print_r($oldArray);//should be empty
            echo '</pre>';
            echo '<br />';
            echo 'This is new dog';
            echo '<pre>';
                    print_r($newArray);//should have been key replaced, in right place and 
            echo '</pre>';
            /*remove:end*/
            $oldArray = $newArray;//I don't like this... not sure if I am "defeating the purpose" with this...
            return true;
    }
    if (swapKeys($oldArray, $oldIndex, $newIndex)) {//At least this is somewhat testable
            echo 'keys have been replaced';
            echo '<br />';
            echo '<pre>';
                print_r($oldArray);//keys have been replaced
            echo '</pre>';
    } else {
            echo 'no keys have been replaced';
            echo '<br />';
            echo '<pre>';
                print_r($oldArray);//no keys have been replaced
            echo '</pre>';
    }

Now the theory has been layed out.... Any issues?, mistakes? Can you tweak it?

Edit: I see Gordon has already come up with similar solution so here is the combo of both using his solution as the core:

What I tested this with:

$oldArray = array('foo' => array('we', 'are', 'family'), 'bar' => array('who', 'let', 'the', 'dogs', 'cat'), 'foobar' => 'raboof', 'I am key' => 'I am value', 'I am also a key' => 'I am value');
$oldIndex = 'foo';
$newIndex = 'foobar2';

The function

function array_key_rename(&$array, $oldKey, $newKey)
{
    if (isset($array[$newKey])) {
            return false;
    }
    if (!isset($array[$oldKey])) {
            return false;
    }
    foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
        $newarray[$key === $oldKey ? $newKey : $key] = $value;
        unset($array[$key]);
    }
    $array = $newarray;
    return true;
}

test it

if (array_key_rename($oldArray, $oldIndex, $newIndex)) {
        echo 'keys have been replaced';
        echo '<br />';
        echo '<pre>';
            print_r($oldArray);//keys have been replaced
        echo '</pre>';
} else {
        echo 'no keys have been replaced';
        echo '<br />';
        echo '<pre>';
            print_r($oldArray);//no keys have been replaced
        echo '</pre>';
}
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Do a double flip! At least that is all I can think of:

$array=("foo"=>"bar","asdf"=>"fdsa");
$array=array_flip($array);
$array["bar"]=>'newkey';
$array=array_flip($array);
share|improve this answer
    
And this is just theory, I haven't tested to see if it works, but I imagine it would. –  Tim Withers Jan 16 '12 at 17:44
5  
That will fail if the there are duplicate values. –  Felix Kling Jan 16 '12 at 17:44
    
True.... welp, then I am out of ideas. –  Tim Withers Jan 16 '12 at 17:45
1  
This will cause some problems if the there are duplicates in the value sets –  Kemal Fadillah Jan 16 '12 at 17:46
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You could use array_combine. It merges an array for keys and another for values...

For instance:

$original_array =('foo'=>'bar','asdf'=>'fdsa');
$new_keys       = array('abc', 'def');
$new_array      = array_combine($new_keys, $original_array);
share|improve this answer
    
what if you have many many keys and want to change just one? With your solution you would be obliged to write an endless $new_keys array. –  Luca Borrione May 8 '12 at 14:58
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