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I wanted to throw this out there for some ideas. I'm writing a program to generate insert/update statements, and I want the table that I insert/update to come from the results of a query. So something like (please forgive the syntax):

INSERT INTO (SELECT TBL_NAME FROM MYTABLES WHERE A=B) VALUES ('A', 'B', 'C');

I have to do this in Oracle, but I'm not too familiar with their declare statements or syntax. I'm guessing the best way to go about it is to declare a variable that is the result of the SELECT, but then can I use that variable as the table name for the INSERT?

I also want to keep the code in SQL.

Thanks for any ideas.

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I don't understand what you're trying to do. An insert statement doesn't fetch any rows, it inserts rows. –  Jack Maney Jan 16 '12 at 19:01
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He wants to insert the values into a table whose name he determines from the subquery. –  bhamby Jan 16 '12 at 19:04
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you may want to look into Dynamic SQL, you may find your answer (or at least a decent starting path) there.

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Yes, dynamic SQL is necessary for this. The query to determine the table name would need to be executed first as a normal inline query, then the insert statement would need to be built as a string, incorporating the table name obtained from the first query. –  Dave Costa Jan 16 '12 at 20:45
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How about something like this:

SELECT 'INSERT INTO ' || TBL_NAME || ' VALUES (''A'', ''B'', ''C'');' cmd
FROM MYTABLES WHERE A=B
;

Run this select, then run the results of the select (which is insert statements). Don't forget to "commit".

Regards, Roger All views are mine ...

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