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I have the following number:

0006.5400
0000.5400
0000.0000

How would I get strip all leading zero's on the left, except if the first digit is a zero. Is there a 'limit' on lstrip()?

I was able to fix this at the database level, but curious anyways.

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Are the dashes indicating negative numbers? – Sven Marnach Jan 16 '12 at 19:29
    
(No, I changed it to make it clearer.) – David542 Jan 16 '12 at 19:30
    
@David542 What's the output that you need? All leading zeros removed or just a few of them? – jcollado Jan 16 '12 at 19:33
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Are they always decimal strings?

>>> float("0000.0000")
0.0
>>> float("0006.5400")
6.54
>>> float("0000.5400")
0.54

EDIT:

As Matt suggested below, you can also use:

'%0.4f' % float("0000.5400")

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1  
or '%.4f' % float("0000.0000") possibly – Matt Jan 16 '12 at 19:36
    
Thanks for point that out :) – Ayoubi Jan 16 '12 at 19:40

This strips the insignificant zeros on the left but preserves the zeros on the right.

import decimal
D = decimal.Decimal

for s in ('0006.5400', '0000.5400', '0000.0000'):
    print(D(s))

yields

6.5400
0.5400
0.0000
share|improve this answer

Probably the simplest solution is just to use lstrip() and then add a leading "0" if necessary.

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