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When building a Windows Console App in C#, is it possible to write to the console without having to extend a current line or go to a new line? For example, if I want to show a percentage representing how close a process is to completion, I'd just like to update the value on the same line as the cursor, and not have to put each percentage on a new line.

Can this be done with a "standard" C# console app?

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13 Answers 13

up vote 257 down vote accepted

If you print only "\r" to the console the cursor goes back to the begining of the current line and then you can rewrite it. This should do the trick:

for(int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
{
    Console.Write("\r{0}%   ", i);
}

Notice the few spaces after the number to make sure that whatever was there before is erased.
Also notice the use of Write() instead of WriteLine() since you don't want to add an "\n" at the end of the line.

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for(int i = 0; i <= 100; ++i) will go to 100% –  Nicolas Tyler Aug 19 '13 at 13:23
3  
How do you handle when the previous write was longer than the new write? Is there some way to get the width of the console and pad the line with spaces, maybe? –  druciferre Oct 11 '13 at 16:25
2  
@druciferre Off the top of my head I can think of two answers for your question. They both involve saving the current output as a string first and padding it with a set amount of characters like this: Console.Write("\r{0}", strOutput.PadRight(nPaddingCount, ' ')); The "nPaddingCount" can be a number that you set yourself or you can keep track of the previous output and set nPaddingCount as the difference in length between the previous and current output plus the current output length. If nPaddingCount is negative then you would not have to use PadRight unless you do abs(prev.len - curr.len). –  John Odom Jan 22 at 19:30
    
@JohnOdom, Genius! –  druciferre Jan 23 at 15:41
    
How do you prevent another Console.write() / Console.writeLine() stopping the updating. –  malgm May 7 at 15:12

You can use Console.SetCursorPosition to set the position of the cursor and then write at the current position.

Here is an example showing a simple "spinner":

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var spin = new ConsoleSpinner();
    Console.Write("Working....");
    while (true) 
    {
        spin.Turn();
    }
}

public class ConsoleSpinner
{
    int counter;
    public ConsoleSpinner()
    {
        counter = 0;
    }
    public void Turn()
    {
        counter++;        
        switch (counter % 4)
        {
            case 0: Console.Write("/"); break;
            case 1: Console.Write("-"); break;
            case 2: Console.Write("\\"); break;
            case 3: Console.Write("|"); break;
        }
        Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.CursorLeft - 1, Console.CursorTop);
    }
}

Note that you will have to make sure to overwrite any existing output with new output or blanks.

Update: As it has been criticized that the example moves the cursor only back by one character, I will add this for clarification: Using SetCursorPosition you may set the cursor to any position in the console window.

Console.SetCursorPosition(0, Console.CursorTop);

will set the cursor to the beginning of the current line (or you can use Console.CursorLeft = 0 directly).

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4  
The problem might be solved using \r, but using SetCursorPosition (or CursorLeft) allows for more flexibility, e.g. not writing at the beginning of the line, moving up in the window, etc so it is a more general approach that can be used to e.g. output custom progress bars or ASCII graphic. –  0xA3 May 20 '09 at 15:28
5  
+1 for being verbose and going above and beyond the call of duty. Good stuff thanks. –  Copas May 20 '09 at 15:36
1  
The added flexibility of SetCursorPosition comes at the cost of a little bit of speed and a noticeable cursor flicker if the loop is long enough for the user to notice. See my test comment below. –  Kevin May 20 '09 at 16:20
1  
Don't forget to check to see if you even have a console to write to. SetCursorPosition will throw an error if you don't. Only way I could figure out how to do it was simply catch the error that it throws and flag it in a Field in the spinner object. –  Mandrake Mar 28 '12 at 19:07
3  
Also confirm that the line length does not cause the console to wrap to the next line or you may get issues with the content running down the console window anyway. –  Mandrake Mar 28 '12 at 19:11

So far we have three competing alternatives for how to do this:

Console.Write("\r{0}   ", value); //option 1: carriage return
Console.Write("\b\b\b\b\b{0}", value); //option 2: backspace
{                                           //option 3 in two parts:
  Console.SetCursorPosition(0, Console.CursorTop); //move cursor
  Console.Write(value);                            //rewrite
}

I've always used Console.CursorLeft = 0, a variation on the third option, so I decided to do some tests. Here's the code I used:

public static void CursorTest()
{
  int testsize = 1000000;
  Console.WriteLine("Testing cursor position");
  Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
  sw.Start();
  for (int i = 0; i < testsize; i++)
  {
    Console.Write("\rCounting: {0}     ", i);
  }
  sw.Stop();
  Console.WriteLine("\nTime using \\r: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
  sw.Reset();
  sw.Start();
  int top = Console.CursorTop;
  for (int i = 0; i < testsize; i++)
  {
    Console.SetCursorPosition(0, top);        
    Console.Write("Counting: {0}     ", i);
  }
  sw.Stop();
  Console.WriteLine("\nTime using CursorLeft: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
  sw.Reset();
  sw.Start();
  Console.Write("Counting:          ");
  for (int i = 0; i < testsize; i++)
  {        
    Console.Write("\b\b\b\b\b\b\b\b{0,8}", i);
  }
  sw.Stop();
  Console.WriteLine("\nTime using \\b: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

On my machine, I get the following results:

  • Backspaces: 25.0 seconds
  • Carriage Returns: 28.7 seconds
  • SetCursorPosition: 49.7 seconds

Additionally, SetCursorPosition caused noticeable flicker that I didn't observe with either of the alternatives. So, the moral is to use backspaces or carriage returns when possible, and thanks for teaching me a faster way to do this, SO!


Update: In the comments, Joel suggests that SetCursorPosition is constant with respect to the distance moved while the other methods are linear. Further testing confirms that this is the case, however constant time and slow is still slow. In my tests, writing a long string of backspaces to the console is faster than SetCursorPosition until somewhere around 60 characters. So backspace is faster for replacing portions of the line shorter than 60 characters (or so), and it doesn't flicker, so I'm going to stand by my initial endorsement of \b over \r and SetCursorPosition.

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The efficiency of the operation in question really shouldn't matter. It should all occur too fast for the user to notice. Unnecessary microptimisation is bad. –  Malfist May 20 '09 at 16:01
    
@Malfist: Depending on the length of the loop, the user may or may not notice. As I added in the edit above (before I saw your comment), SetCursorPosition introduced flicker and takes almost twice as long as the other options. –  Kevin May 20 '09 at 16:08
    
I agree that it is a micro-optimisation (running it a million times and taking 50 seconds is still a very small amount of time), +1 for the results, and it could definitely be very useful to know. –  Andy May 20 '09 at 16:18
5  
The benchmark is fundamentally flawed. It's possible that SetCursorPosition() time is the same no matter how far the cursor moves, while the other options vary by how many characters the console has to process. –  Joel Coehoorn May 20 '09 at 18:42
1  
This is a very nice sum up of the different options available. However, I also see flickering when using \r. With \b there is obviously no flickering because the fix text ("Counting:") is not rewritten. You will also get flickering if you add additional \b and rewrite the fix text as it is happening with \b and SetCursorPosition. Concerning Joel's remark: Joel is basically right, however \r will still outperform SetCursorPosition on very long lines, but the difference gets less. –  0xA3 May 20 '09 at 19:29

You can use the \b (backspace) escape sequence to backup a particular number of characters on the current line. This just moves the current location, it does not remove the characters.

For example:

string line="";

for(int i=0; i<100; i++)
{
    string backup=new string('\b',line.Length);
    Console.Write(backup);
    line=string.Format("{0}%",i);
    Console.Write(line);
}

Here, line is the percentage line to write to the console. The trick is to generate the correct number of \b characters for the previous output.

The advantage of this over the \r approach is that if works even if your percentage output is not at the beginning of the line.

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+1, this turns out to be the fastest method presented (see my test comment below) –  Kevin May 20 '09 at 16:18

I just had to play with the divo's ConsoleSpinner class. Mine is nowhere near as concise, but it just didn't sit well with me that users of that class have to write their own while(true) loop. I'm shooting for an experience more like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.Write("Working....");
    ConsoleSpinner spin = new ConsoleSpinner();
    spin.Start();

    // Do some work...

    spin.Stop(); 
}

And I realized it with the code below. Since I don't want my Start() method to block, I don't want the user to have to worry about writing a while(spinFlag) -like loop, and I want to allow multiple spinners at the same time I had to spawn a separate thread to handle the spinning. And that means the code has to be a lot more complicated.

Also, I haven't done that much multi-threading so it's possible (likely even) that I've left a subtle bug or three in there. But it seems to work pretty well so far:

public class ConsoleSpinner : IDisposable
{       
    public ConsoleSpinner()
    {
        CursorLeft = Console.CursorLeft;
        CursorTop = Console.CursorTop;  
    }

    public ConsoleSpinner(bool start)
        : this()
    {
        if (start) Start();
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        // prevent two conflicting Start() calls ot the same instance
        lock (instanceLocker) 
        {
            if (!running )
            {
                running = true;
                turner = new Thread(Turn);
                turner.Start();
            }
        }
    }

    public void StartHere()
    {
        SetPosition();
        Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        lock (instanceLocker)
        {
            if (!running) return;

            running = false;
            if (! turner.Join(250))
                turner.Abort();
        }
    }

    public void SetPosition()
    {
        SetPosition(Console.CursorLeft, Console.CursorTop);
    }

    public void SetPosition(int left, int top)
    {
        bool wasRunning;
        //prevent other start/stops during move
        lock (instanceLocker)
        {
            wasRunning = running;
            Stop();

            CursorLeft = left;
            CursorTop = top;

            if (wasRunning) Start();
        } 
    }

    public bool IsSpinning { get { return running;} }

    /* ---  PRIVATE --- */

    private int counter=-1;
    private Thread turner; 
    private bool running = false;
    private int rate = 100;
    private int CursorLeft;
    private int CursorTop;
    private Object instanceLocker = new Object();
    private static Object console = new Object();

    private void Turn()
    {
        while (running)
        {
            counter++;

            // prevent two instances from overlapping cursor position updates
            // weird things can still happen if the main ui thread moves the cursor during an update and context switch
            lock (console)
            {                  
                int OldLeft = Console.CursorLeft;
                int OldTop = Console.CursorTop;
                Console.SetCursorPosition(CursorLeft, CursorTop);

                switch (counter)
                {
                    case 0: Console.Write("/"); break;
                    case 1: Console.Write("-"); break;
                    case 2: Console.Write("\\"); break;
                    case 3: Console.Write("|"); counter = -1; break;
                }
                Console.SetCursorPosition(OldLeft, OldTop);
            }

            Thread.Sleep(rate);
        }
        lock (console)
        {   // clean up
            int OldLeft = Console.CursorLeft;
            int OldTop = Console.CursorTop;
            Console.SetCursorPosition(CursorLeft, CursorTop);
            Console.Write(' ');
            Console.SetCursorPosition(OldLeft, OldTop);
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Stop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice modification, though the sample code is not mine. It's taken from Brad Abrams' blog (see the link in my answer). I think it's just been written as a simple sample demonstrating SetCursorPosition. Btw, I'm definitely surprised (in a positive way) about the discussion started about what I thought was just a simple sample. That's why I love this site :-) –  0xA3 May 20 '09 at 19:34

\r is used for this scenarios.
\r represents a carriage return which means the cursor returns to the start of the line.
That's why windows uses \n\r as it's new line marker.
\n moves you down a line, and \r returns you to the start of the line.

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Explicitly using a Carrage Return (\r) at the beginning of the line rather than (implicitly or explicitly) using a New Line (\n) at the end should get what you want. For example:

void demoPercentDone() {
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        System.Console.Write( "\rProcessing {0}%...", i );
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep( 1000 );
    }
    System.Console.WriteLine();    
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1, Question asks for C#, I rewrite it in C# and you change it back to F# –  Malfist May 20 '09 at 15:34
    
It looks like an editing conflict rather than him changing your C# back to F#. His change was a minute after yours, and focussed on the sprintf. –  Andy May 20 '09 at 15:44
    
ah, removed the downvote then. –  Malfist May 20 '09 at 15:58
    
We need one more edit to get rid of the reference to F# –  Andy May 20 '09 at 16:14
    
Thanks for the edit. I tend to use F# interactive mode to test things and figured the important parts were the BCL calls, which are the same in C#. –  James Hugard May 22 '09 at 15:18

From the Console docs in MSDN:

You can solve this problem by setting the TextWriter.NewLine property of the Out or Error property to another line termination string. For example, the C# statement, Console.Error.NewLine = "\r\n\r\n";, sets the line termination string for the standard error output stream to two carriage return and line feed sequences. Then you can explicitly call the WriteLine method of the error output stream object, as in the C# statement, Console.Error.WriteLine();

So - I did this:

Console.Out.Newline = String.Empty;

Then I am able to control the output myself;

Console.WriteLine("Starting item 1:");
    Item1();
Console.WriteLine("OK.\nStarting Item2:");

Another way of getting there.

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    public void Update(string data)
    {
        Console.Write(string.Format("\r{0}", "".PadLeft(Console.CursorLeft, ' ')));
        Console.Write(string.Format("\r{0}", data));
    }
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Here is my take on s soosh's and 0xA3's answers. It can update the console with user messages while updating the spinner and has an elapsed time indicator aswell.

public class ConsoleSpiner : IDisposable
{
    private static readonly string INDICATOR = "/-\\|";
    private static readonly string MASK = "\r{0} {1:c} {2}";
    int counter;
    Timer timer;
    string message;

    public ConsoleSpiner() {
        counter = 0;
        timer = new Timer(200);
        timer.Elapsed += TimerTick;
    }

    public void Start() {
        timer.Start();
    }

    public void Stop() {
        timer.Stop();
        counter = 0;
    }

    public string Message {
        get { return message; }
        set { message = value; }
    }

    private void TimerTick(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e) {
        Turn();
    }

    private void Turn() {
        counter++;
        var elapsed = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(counter * 200);
        Console.Write(MASK, INDICATOR[counter % 4], elapsed, this.Message);
    }

    public void Dispose() {
        Stop();
        timer.Elapsed -= TimerTick;
        this.timer.Dispose();
    }
}

usage is something like this. class Program {

    static void Main(string[] args) {
        using (var spinner = new ConsoleSpiner()) {
            spinner.Start();
            spinner.Message = "About to do some heavy staff :-)"
            DoWork();
            spinner.Message = "Now processing other staff".
            OtherWork();
            spinner.Stop();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("COMPLETED!!!!!\nPress any key to exit.");

    }
share|improve this answer

Here's another one :D

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.Write("Working... ");
        int spinIndex = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            // obfuscate FTW! Let's hope overflow is disabled or testers are impatient
            Console.Write("\b" + @"/-\|"[(spinIndex++) & 3]);
        }
    }
}
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The SetCursorPosition method works in multi-threading scenario, where the other two methods don't

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If you want update one line, but the information is too long to show on one line, it may need some new lines. I've encountered this problem, and below is one way to solve this.

public class DumpOutPutInforInSameLine
{

    //content show in how many lines
    int TotalLine = 0;

    //start cursor line
    int cursorTop = 0;

    // use to set  character number show in one line
    int OneLineCharNum = 75;

    public void DumpInformation(string content)
    {
        OutPutInSameLine(content);
        SetBackSpace();

    }
    static void backspace(int n)
    {
        for (var i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            Console.Write("\b \b");
    }

    public  void SetBackSpace()
    {

        if (TotalLine == 0)
        {
            backspace(OneLineCharNum);
        }
        else
        {
            TotalLine--;
            while (TotalLine >= 0)
            {
                backspace(OneLineCharNum);
                TotalLine--;
                if (TotalLine >= 0)
                {
                    Console.SetCursorPosition(OneLineCharNum, cursorTop + TotalLine);
                }
            }
        }

    }

    private void OutPutInSameLine(string content)
    {
        //Console.WriteLine(TotalNum);

        cursorTop = Console.CursorTop;

        TotalLine = content.Length / OneLineCharNum;

        if (content.Length % OneLineCharNum > 0)
        {
            TotalLine++;

        }

        if (TotalLine == 0)
        {
            Console.Write("{0}", content);

            return;

        }

        int i = 0;
        while (i < TotalLine)
        {
            int cNum = i * OneLineCharNum;
            if (i < TotalLine - 1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}", content.Substring(cNum, OneLineCharNum));
            }
            else
            {
                Console.Write("{0}", content.Substring(cNum, content.Length - cNum));
            }
            i++;

        }
    }

}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        DumpOutPutInforInSameLine outPutInSameLine = new DumpOutPutInforInSameLine();

        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("");
        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb");


        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa");
        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb");

        //need several lines
        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa");
        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb");

        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa");
        outPutInSameLine.DumpInformation("bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb");

    }
}
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