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Data structures class, implementing a singly linked-list with head, tail and current nodes. Having trouble with a method, could use a nudge in the right direction.

From the assignment, write the method:

add( item ) : adds the item (String) after the current node in the list and sets the current pointer to refer to the new node.

My attempt:

public void add(String item)
{
    if(curr != null)
    {
        Node newNode = new Node(item, curr.next);
        curr.next = newNode;
        curr = newNode;
    }
    else
    {
        head = tail = new Node(item, null);
        curr = head;
    }
}

My add method only seems to work when I'm adding items to the middle of the list, not on either end. If I use it to add a few items and then print the list, only the first one I added will be on the list, while my prepend and append methods have tested just fine.

Is there any glaring issue with my code? I feel like I'm missing something obvious.

All:

public class LinkedList {
    Node head = null; /* Head of the list */
    Node tail = null; /* Tail of the list */
    Node curr = null; /* Current node in the list */

    public void prepend(String item) {
        if (head == null) {
            head = tail = new Node(item, null);
            curr = head;
        } else {
            head = new Node(item, head);
            curr = head;
        }
    }

    public void append(String item) {
        if (head == null) {
            head = tail = new Node(item, null);
            curr = tail;
        } else {
            tail.next = new Node(item, null);
            tail = tail.next;
            curr = tail;
        }
    }

    public void add(String item) {
        if (curr != null) {
            Node newNode = new Node(item, curr.next);
            curr.next = newNode;
            curr = newNode;
        } else {
            head = tail = new Node(item, null);
            curr = head;
        }
    }

    public void delete() {
        if (curr.next == null) {
            Node temp = head;
            while (temp.next != curr) {
                System.out.println(temp.item);
                temp = temp.next;
            }
            temp.next = null;
            curr = head;
        }
    }

    public void find(String item) {
        Node temp = new Node(curr.item, curr.next);
        if (item.equals(temp.item))
            curr = temp;
        else {
            temp = temp.next;
            while (temp.next != null && temp != curr) {
                if (item.equals(temp.item))
                    curr = temp;
            }
        }
    }

    public String get() {
        if (curr != null)
            return curr.item;
        else
            return "";
    }

    public boolean next() {
        if (curr != tail) {
            curr = curr.next;
            return true;
        } else
            return false;
    }

    public void start() {
        curr = head;
    }

    public void end() {
        curr = tail;
    }

    public boolean empty() {
        if (head == null)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
}

Node class:

class Node {
    Node next;
    String item;

    Node(String item, Node next) {
        this.next = next;
        this.item = item;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
What about the rest of the code? –  fge Jan 16 '12 at 19:47
    
That part looks good, so show us the surrounding code, the error must be there. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '12 at 19:57
    
added rest of code –  dysania Jan 16 '12 at 19:57
    
What is the curr object? What error do you get when you try to prepend and append nodes? AND what the heck is head=tail=new Node(item, null)? (Have I not learnt that bit?) - Without knowing the atleast the answer to these questions no one will be able to help you! –  Andy Jan 16 '12 at 19:57
    
How do you test the output? The find method only looks after the current node and doesn't start with the head. Therefore it's possible that you wouldn't get all the nodes... and btw: Your empty() method could simply be written as return head==null; –  Chnoch Jan 16 '12 at 20:07

4 Answers 4

There is indeed a problem in add: it doesn't update tail when nodes already exist. Consider this sequence of actions:

LinkedList list = new LinkedList(); 
list.add("one");
list.add("two");
list.append("three");

If you were to then print it using this:

public void print() {
    Node curr = this.head;
    while(curr != null) {
        System.out.println(curr.item);
        curr = curr.next;
    }
}

Like this:

list.print();

You'd get the following output:

one
three

This happens because tail -- which append relies on -- continues to point to the first Node after the second add operation is performed.

share|improve this answer

I don't see any problems here, so I would guess the issue is elsewhere.

Okay, the only issue I see there is in delete:

public void delete()
{
    Node temp = head;

    while(temp != null && temp.next != curr) {
         System.out.println(temp.item);
         temp=temp.next;

    }

    if (temp != null && temp.next != null) {
        temp.next = temp.next.next;
    }
    curr = head;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Well this is my first time using a provided driver file to test my code, so maybe the problem is there.. thanks for looking though. –  dysania Jan 16 '12 at 20:06
    
Appreciate the help but I had stopped working on delete once I realized add wasn't testing properly, haven't finished testing find method either. –  dysania Jan 16 '12 at 20:17
    
There's definitely an error in add, see my answer (or @Chnoch's). –  lwburk Jan 16 '12 at 20:28

I think I have found your problem. If you use append() you add it directly after the tail. But when you have added previous nodes after the tail you don't set your tail to the new node. This means that once you call append() twice you loose all the nodes that you have added after the first append().

Brief example:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    LinkedList list = new LinkedList();
    list.add("First add");
    list.append("First Append");
    list.add("Second add");
    list.prepend("First prepend");
    list.add("Third add");
    list.prepend("Second prepend");
    list.add("fourth add");
    list.append("Second Append");
    list.add("Fifth add");
    list.add("Sixth add");

    list.start();
    do {
        System.out.println(list.get().toString());

    } while (list.next());
}

Output:

Second prepend
fourth add
First prepend
Third add
First add
First Append
Second Append

Conclusion: "Second Add" is lost, as well as "Fifth add" and "Sixth add" because your next() method stops as soon as it reaches the tail. You need to always update the tail if you add a new node in the end.

Hope this helps. Cheers, Chnoch

share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful thanks, will work on it –  dysania Jan 16 '12 at 20:27

I think the problem is

if (curr != null) {
    Node newNode = new Node(item, curr.next); //<-- here (curr.next)

//and

Node(String item, Node next) {
    this.next = next; //<-- here

Try (Edited):

Node newNode = new Node(item, curr); // pass curr to the constructor of Node
curr = newNode;
share|improve this answer
1  
I think this would make a node point at itself rather than the next node. –  vextorspace Jan 16 '12 at 19:55
1  
No, that would disconnect the list, the current curr would not point to the inserted node. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 16 '12 at 19:56
1  
If you'd do that you would loose the link between the elements... Because then the nodes would all just point to themselves. I think his code is fine: You first assign the next value of the current variable to the new node and then let the new node be the current one. Makes sense to me. –  Chnoch Jan 16 '12 at 19:57
    
I thought so too, but I've been staring at this for so long that I'm starting to doubt and second-guess everything I've written.. –  dysania Jan 16 '12 at 20:00
    
@user1152522: See update. –  Bhesh Gurung Jan 16 '12 at 20:22

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